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blasting mining underground
 
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examples blasting mining
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COLLECTIVE INVESTMENTS FOR SAFETY MINING – BIZWATCH
 
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The Philippine Mine Safety and Environment Association announced that collective investments to make the country’s mineral sector a much safer industry have been increasing yearly. The 64th Annual National Mine Safety and Safety Conference was recently held. The association president Louie Sarmiento announced during the conference that miners in the country have transformed themselves and invested billions of money for technology and world-class designs to mitigate the risks in their mining operations. He was quoted as saying that “in spite of the challenges of the industry, and we are not a perfect industry, we are focused and committed to not only advocate responsible mining but to practice it on the ground.” Risks such as landslide and flooding in the mining operations are seen to be mitigated with the advent of new technologies, mining designs and extensive experience. The association president, Mr. Louie Sarmiento, assesses the mining operations in the country right now as meeting safety standards within the industry. Mr. Sarmiento says they expect more mining companies to meet global mining standards and guidelines with improved technology and designs. This includes dealing with the risks of open-pit mining in extracting minerals in the Philippines.
Mining and Development in the Andes: Welcome and Introduction
 
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04-03-13 Institute for the Study of the Americas http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/13220/FULLY+BOOKED%3A+Alternative+Strategies+for+Mining-based+Economies%3A+Mining+and+Development+in+the+Andean+Region Mining and Development in the Andes: Alternative strategies for mining-based economies Welcome: Prof. Linda Newson, ISA Introduction: Prof. Tony Bebbington, Clark University Mining activity has the potential to bring significant developmental benefits to countries in the Andes. However, as resources are exhausted, governments are turning to exploration in less desirable areas and proposing projects which may cause serious environmental damage. This has increasingly resulted in conflict with local communities and raises questions about how to manage and regulate the extractive industries. There are also broader debates about the risks and dangers associated with depending on a handful of commodities to sustain national economies, particularly when these are non-renewable. Even while governments pursue "extractivist" policies, innovative alternative development proposals are emerging from civil society and from governments themselves. Both the Bolivian and Ecuadorian governments have included the language and principles of vivir bien in development plans and laws. Others prioritise in-country processing of raw materials or a move away from export-based, growth-centred strategies. Another approach is simply to better regulate large-scale mining investment so as to maximise its spread effects and contribution to local development.
Views: 101 SchAdvStudy
Mining and Development in the Andes: Protecting human rights
 
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04-03-13 Institute for the Study of the Americas http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/13220/FULLY+BOOKED%3A+Alternative+Strategies+for+Mining-based+Economies%3A+Mining+and+Development+in+the+Andean+Region Mining and Development in the Andes: Alternative strategies for mining-based economies Protecting human rights in relation to extractive industry projects Dr. Carlos Monge Mining activity has the potential to bring significant developmental benefits to countries in the Andes. However, as resources are exhausted, governments are turning to exploration in less desirable areas and proposing projects which may cause serious environmental damage. This has increasingly resulted in conflict with local communities and raises questions about how to manage and regulate the extractive industries. There are also broader debates about the risks and dangers associated with depending on a handful of commodities to sustain national economies, particularly when these are non-renewable. Even while governments pursue "extractivist" policies, innovative alternative development proposals are emerging from civil society and from governments themselves. Both the Bolivian and Ecuadorian governments have included the language and principles of vivir bien in development plans and laws. Others prioritise in-country processing of raw materials or a move away from export-based, growth-centred strategies. Another approach is simply to better regulate large-scale mining investment so as to maximise its spread effects and contribution to local development.
Views: 41 SchAdvStudy