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Gregorian Chants at 432Hz | 3 Hours of Healing Music
 
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Gregorian Chants at 432Hz | Very Soothing Healing Music with Orchestral Arrangement For Awesome Meditations, Mantras, Chants and More, please subscribe to our channel here : http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TheMeditativeMind Gregorian chant is the central tradition of Western plainchant, a form of monophonic, unaccompanied sacred song of the western Roman Catholic Church. Gregorian chant developed mainly in western and central Europe during the 9th and 10th centuries, with later additions and redaction. Although popular legend credits Pope St. Gregory the Great with inventing Gregorian chant, scholars believe that it arose from a later Carolingian synthesis of Roman chant and Gallican chant. Gregorian chants were organized initially into four, then eight, and finally twelve modes. Typical melodic features include a characteristic ambitus, and also characteristic intervallic patterns relative to a referential mode final, incipits and cadences, the use of reciting tones at a particular distance from the final, around which the other notes of the melody revolve, and a vocabulary of musical motifs woven together through a process called centonization to create families of related chants. The scale patterns are organized against a background pattern formed of conjunct and disjunct tetrachords, producing a larger pitch system called the gamut. The chants can be sung by using six-note patterns called hexachords. Gregorian melodies are traditionally written using neumes, an early form of musical notation from which the modern four-line and five-line staff developed. Multi-voice elaborations of Gregorian chant, known as organum, were an early stage in the development of Western polyphony. NEW CD-ALBUM: Magical Mantras for Meditation: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/album/magical-mantras-for-meditation/id1053304774?mt=1&app=music ►For more chakra meditation, mantra chanting and meditation music please subscribe our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TheMeditativeMind ►Meditative Mind website: http://www.meditativemind.org ►Meditative Mind music: https://itunes.apple.com/artist/meditative-mind/id566257399 BEST OF MEDITATIVE MIND MUSIC AND CHANTS COLLECTION ☯Mantra Chanting Meditation Music - Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsuCfYXzi5DLQmw5DbidL4xfFk2bNHXuq ☯30 Days of Chants - Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsuCfYXzi5DJROIVum5E8GUoWyH7Gw7xQ ☯Chakra Healing Meditations - Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsuCfYXzi5DLBuizPUvtxHe1MjkBVInDz ☯Gurbani Meditation Music - Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsuCfYXzi5DKMTXvscFkkRVb4Oyg-CWaH ☯Deep Sleep Meditation Music for 7 Chakras - Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsuCfYXzi5DIkooHBDHLelRxXWgfivIFD ☯Healing Frequencies Music - Playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsuCfYXzi5DIQIJ1aHf3X4LKtmjKyj5Az
Views: 3524622 Meditative Mind
Humanism, Historical Consciousness, and Philosophies of the Reformation
 
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http://youtube.com/themodernhermeticist 2018 Documentary: Ad Fontes, Ad Radices - Humanism, Historical Consciousness, and Philosophies of the Reformation Thanks to a few recent patrons, I got myself a new video editing software and decided to animate my most recent talk instead of the usual static image. It took me way more time than it should have, so hopefully it is useful to some of you, especially those who want to go beyond the stock Reformation/Luther documentaries and get into the details a bit more. - inb4 art historians complain about anachronisms; I'm aware of the sins I have committed, but you'll see I at least tried harder than the people over at Ancient Aliens) www.themodernhermeticist.com Bibliography Bainton, Roland H. Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther. New York: Abingdon Press, 1950. (https://amzn.to/2jq0vDP) Benedict, Philip. Christ's Churches Purely Reformed: A Social History of Calvinism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002. (https://amzn.to/2jpWEqg) Blickle, Peter. The Revolution of 1525. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1981. (https://amzn.to/2rg94W4) Bossy, John. Christianity in the West, 1400-1700. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989. (https://amzn.to/2Kybkjs) Brady Jr., Thomas A. The Politics of the Reformation in Germany: Jacob Sturm (1489-1553). New Jersey: Humanities Press, 1997. (https://amzn.to/2KybEyG) Cameron, Euan. The European Reformation (2nd Ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. (https://amzn.to/2HHKUOd) Moeller, Bernd. Imperial Cities and the Reformation. Durham: The Labyrinth Press, 1982. (https://amzn.to/2HNNSgd) Oberman, Heiko A., and Eileen Walliser-Schwarzbart (trans.). Luther: Man between God and the Devil. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989. (https://amzn.to/2JNkWWo) Roper, Lyndal. Martin Luther: Renagade and Prophet. London: The Bodley Head, 2016. (https://amzn.to/2I7KGQ8) Ryrie, Alec. Being Protestant in Reformation Britain. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. (https://amzn.to/2HKZOPN) Tracy, James D. Erasmus of the Low Countries. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1996. (https://amzn.to/2KuNTaE) Walsham, Alexandra. "Migrations of the Holy: Explaining Religious Change in Medieval and Early Modern Europe." Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 44 (2), 2014: 241-280.
Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft & Mary Shelley
 
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Award-winning author Charlotte Gordon discussed her biography of Mary Shelley and her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, entitled "Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley." She then has a conversation with Washington Post columnist Michael Dirda. Gordon recently authored the introduction to the anniversary re-issue of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein." Speaker Biography: A distinguished professor of the Humanities at Endicott College, Charlotte Gordon is an award-winning author whose work has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post, among other publications. Her latest book, "Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley," won the National Book Critics Circle award. Speaker Biography: Michael Dirda is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post Book World, the author of the memoir "An Open Book" and of four collections of essays. He was born in Lorain, Ohio, graduated from Oberlin College and received a doctorate in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=8645
Views: 1018 LibraryOfCongress
Liturgy Matters | Katie Bugyis || Radcliffe Institute
 
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As part of the 2018–2019 Fellows’ Presentation Series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Katie Bugyis RI ’19 shares research from her current book project, “Liturgy Matters: Benedictine Women’s Communities in Medieval England,” which reclaims the materiality of Benedictine nuns’ liturgical practices by viewing these women as “technologists” who transformed—and were transformed by—their sensual engagement with the objects they created, acquired, handled, and treasured. Bugyis is a historian of medieval religious women, especially interested in recovering the liturgical practices they cultivated and the levels of literacy they attained as readers, copyists, and composers of different genres of texts, from prayers to plays. She is the 2018–2019 Joy Foundation Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University. https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/people/katie-bugyis For information about the Radcliffe Institute and its many public programs, visit https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RadcliffeInstitute Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/RadInstitute Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/radcliffe.institute
Views: 1270 Harvard University
KCL Cathsoc Goes to Douai Abbey
 
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This is a short video that highlights KCL Cathsoc retreat to Douai Abbey. Music: http://www.bensound.com
Views: 179 Gabriela Warpsinski
HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES
 
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HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES 👅 SUSCRÍBETE https://goo.gl/PpDqDx A DOCUMENTARIES👍 😜 👆 HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES 👍 DALE PULGAR HACIA ARRIBA SI TE GUSTO EL DOCUMENTAL 👍ツ HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES 🗣 DEJEN SUS COMENTARIOS BEST DOCUMENTARIES 💭 HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORY 👍 LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,THE HISTORY CHANNEL,DOCUMENTALES LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries LA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA,LA ALTA EDAD MEDIA,EDAD MEDIA DOCUMENTAL+,como,cómo,cuando,curiosidades,hist,histo,historia,history,history channel,history com,porque,search history,the history channel,world history,DOCUMENTALES HISTORIA,DOCUMENTALES DE HISTORIA,best documentaries,best documentaries on netflix,best documentaries on youtube,docu,document,documentales,documentales online,documentaries,documentaries 2017,documentary,documentary film,documentry,top documentaries,youtube documentaries #Documental#Documentales#MejoresDocumentales#DocumentalesEnEspañol#Documentales CompletosEnEspañol#DocumentalesInteresantes#Video#Videos -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "BATALLAS EPICAS DE LA HISTORIA,MIOSÉS,DOCUMENTALES GUERRA,DOCUMENTALES DOCUMENTAL,BIBLIA DOCUMENTAL" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AtzkQ0H-tJU -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
History of Western civilization | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of Western civilization Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Western civilization traces its roots back to Europe and the Mediterranean. It is linked to the Roman Empire and with Medieval Western Christendom which emerged from the Middle Ages to experience such transformative episodes as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, scientific revolution, and the development of liberal democracy. The civilizations of Classical Greece and Ancient Rome are considered seminal periods in Western history; a few cultural contributions also emerged from the pagan peoples of pre-Christian Europe, such as the Celts and Germans, as well as some significant religious contributions derived from Judaism and Hellenistic Judaism stemming back to Second Temple Judea, Galilee, and the early Jewish diaspora; and some other Middle Eastern influences. Christianity and Roman Catholicism has played a prominent role in the shaping of Western civilization, which throughout most of its history, has been nearly equivalent to Christian culture. (There were Christians outside of the West, such as China, India, Russia, Byzantium and the Middle East). Western civilization has spread to produce the dominant cultures of modern Americas and Oceania, and has had immense global influence in recent centuries in many ways. Following the 5th century Fall of Rome, Western Europe entered the Middle Ages, during which period the Catholic Church filled the power vacuum left in the West by the fall of the Western Roman Empire, while the Eastern Roman Empire (or Byzantine Empire) endured in the East for centuries, becoming a Hellenic Eastern contrast to the Latin West. By the 12th century, Western Europe was experiencing a flowering of art and learning, propelled by the construction of cathedrals and the establishment of medieval universities. Christian unity was shattered by the Reformation from the 16th century. A merchant class grew out of city states, initially in the Italian peninsula (see Italian city-states), and Europe experienced the Renaissance from the 14th to the 17th century, heralding an age of technological and artistic advance and ushering in the Age of Discovery which saw the rise of such global European Empires as those of Spain and Portugal. The Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century. Under the influence of the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolution emerged from the United States and France as part of the transformation of the West into its industrialised, democratised modern form. The lands of North and South America, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand became first part of European Empires and then home to new Western nations, while Africa and Asia were largely carved up between Western powers. Laboratories of Western democracy were founded in Britain's colonies in Australasia from the mid-19th centuries, while South America largely created new autocracies. In the 20th century, absolute monarchy disappeared from Europe, and despite episodes of Fascism and Communism, by the close of the century, virtually all of Europe was electing its leaders democratically. Most Western nations were heavily involved in the First and Second World Wars and protracted Cold War. World War II saw Fascism defeated in Europe, and the emergence of the United States and Soviet Union as rival global powers and a new "East-West" political contrast. Other than in Russia, the European Empires disintegrated after World War II and civil rights movements and widescale multi-ethnic, multi-faith migrations to Europe, the Americas and Oceania lowered the earlier predominance of ethnic Europeans in Western culture. European nations moved towards greater economic and political co-operation through the European Union. The Cold War ended around 1990 with the collapse of Soviet imposed Communism in Central and Eastern Europe. In the 21st century, the Western World retains significant global economic power and influ ...
Views: 516 wikipedia tts
Castlevania: Lords of Shadow - Mirror of Fate - Deadly Waterfalls/Unholy Church Music
 
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This piece plays in the Deadly Waterfalls of Act I and Unholy Church of Act III amongst other places. All artwork is the property of MercurySteam/Konami. I would also like to thank all the talented individuals at Mecury Steam and Konami as well as the composer himself, Oscar Araujo, for creating the game.
Views: 941 The More That I Try
Timeline of Christian missions | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_Christian_missions 00:00:12 1 Apostolic Age 00:01:57 2 Early Christianity 00:05:57 3 Era of the seven Ecumenical Councils 00:16:04 4 Middle Ages 00:19:07 5 1000 to 1499 00:27:30 6 1500 to 1600 00:44:58 7 1600 to 1699 01:03:37 8 1700 to 1799 01:26:16 9 1800 to 1849 01:42:16 10 1850 to 1899 01:59:20 11 1900 to 1949 02:11:58 12 1950 to 1999 02:24:01 13 2000 to present 02:26:46 14 Footnotes 02:26:55 15 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7752023995226462 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This timeline of Christian missions chronicles the global expansion of Christianity through a listing of the most significant missionary outreach events.
Views: 70 wikipedia tts
Pacifism | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Pacifism 00:01:01 1 Definition 00:02:22 1.1 Moral considerations 00:02:59 1.2 Nonviolence 00:04:09 1.3 Absolute pacifism 00:04:48 2 Police actions and national liberation 00:06:03 3 Early traditions of pacifism 00:06:19 3.1 China 00:07:23 3.2 Lemba 00:07:50 3.3 Moriori 00:08:45 3.4 Greece 00:09:49 3.5 Roman Empire 00:10:22 3.6 Christianity 00:12:08 4 Modern history 00:15:56 4.1 Peace movements 00:19:45 4.2 Non-violent resistance 00:21:56 4.3 World War I 00:24:47 4.4 Between the two World Wars 00:26:00 4.4.1 Great Britain 00:29:00 4.4.2 Spain 00:29:54 4.4.3 France 00:30:37 4.4.4 Germany 00:31:21 4.5 World War II 00:31:57 4.5.1 Great Britain 00:33:12 4.5.2 France 00:34:02 4.5.3 Germany 00:35:52 4.5.4 Conscientious Objectors 00:37:18 4.6 Later twentieth century 00:39:13 4.7 Anti-War Literature of the 20th Century 00:39:49 5 Religious attitudes 00:39:58 5.1 Ahmadiyya 00:41:00 5.2 Bahá'í Faith 00:42:21 5.3 Buddhism 00:43:19 5.4 Christianity 00:43:28 5.4.1 Peace churches 00:44:25 5.4.2 Pentecostal churches 00:45:32 5.4.3 Other Christian denominations 00:49:23 5.5 Hinduism 00:49:57 5.6 Jainism 00:50:38 5.7 Judaism 00:53:03 5.8 Raëlism 00:53:30 6 Government and political movements 00:56:56 6.1 Pacifism and abstention from political activity 00:57:38 6.2 Anarcho-pacifism 00:59:15 6.3 Opposition to military taxation 00:59:45 7 Criticism Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Pacifism is opposition to war, militarism, or violence. The word pacifism was coined by the French peace campaigner Émile Arnaud (1864–1921) and adopted by other peace activists at the tenth Universal Peace Congress in Glasgow in 1901. A related term is ahimsa (to do no harm), which is a core philosophy in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. While modern connotations are recent, having been explicated since the 19th century, ancient references abound. In modern times, interest was revived by Leo Tolstoy in his late works, particularly in The Kingdom of God Is Within You. Mohandas Gandhi (1869–1948) propounded the practice of steadfast nonviolent opposition which he called "satyagraha", instrumental in its role in the Indian Independence Movement. Its effectiveness served as inspiration to Martin Luther King Jr., James Lawson, James Bevel, Thich Nhat Hanh and many others in the civil rights movement.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Chios | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Chios Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Chios (; Greek: Χίος, Khíos, Greek pronunciation: [ˈçi.os]) is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea, 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) off the Anatolian coast. The island is separated from Turkey by the Chios Strait. Chios is notable for its exports of mastic gum and its nickname is the Mastic Island. Tourist attractions include its medieval villages and the 11th-century monastery of Nea Moni, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Administratively, the island forms a separate municipality within the Chios regional unit, which is part of the North Aegean region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Chios. Locals refer to Chios town as "Chora" ("Χώρα" literally means land or country, but usually refers to the capital or a settlement at the highest point of a Greek island). It was also the site of the Chios massacre in which tens of thousands of Greeks on the island were killed by Ottoman troops during the Greek War of Independence in 1822.
Views: 24 wikipedia tts
Alps | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Alps Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Alps (; French: Alpes [alp]; German: Alpen [ˈalpn̩]; Italian: Alpi [ˈalpi]; Romansh: Alps; Slovene: Alpe [ˈáːlpɛ]) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe, stretching approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) across eight Alpine countries (from west to east): France, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia. The mountains were formed over tens of millions of years as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided. Extreme shortening caused by the event resulted in marine sedimentary rocks rising by thrusting and folding into high mountain peaks such as Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn. Mont Blanc spans the French–Italian border, and at 4,810 m (15,781 ft) is the highest mountain in the Alps. The Alpine region area contains about a hundred peaks higher than 4,000 metres (13,000 ft). The altitude and size of the range affects the climate in Europe; in the mountains precipitation levels vary greatly and climatic conditions consist of distinct zones. Wildlife such as ibex live in the higher peaks to elevations of 3,400 m (11,155 ft), and plants such as Edelweiss grow in rocky areas in lower elevations as well as in higher elevations. Evidence of human habitation in the Alps goes back to the Palaeolithic era. A mummified man, determined to be 5,000 years old, was discovered on a glacier at the Austrian–Italian border in 1991. By the 6th century BC, the Celtic La Tène culture was well established. Hannibal famously crossed the Alps with a herd of elephants, and the Romans had settlements in the region. In 1800, Napoleon crossed one of the mountain passes with an army of 40,000. The 18th and 19th centuries saw an influx of naturalists, writers, and artists, in particular, the Romantics, followed by the golden age of alpinism as mountaineers began to ascend the peaks. The Alpine region has a strong cultural identity. The traditional culture of farming, cheesemaking, and woodworking still exists in Alpine villages, although the tourist industry began to grow early in the 20th century and expanded greatly after World War II to become the dominant industry by the end of the century. The Winter Olympic Games have been hosted in the Swiss, French, Italian, Austrian and German Alps. At present, the region is home to 14 million people and has 120 million annual visitors.
Views: 18 wikipedia tts
Anglican | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:43:37
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglicanism 00:03:43 1 Terminology 00:06:09 1.1 Definition 00:10:02 2 Anglican identity 00:10:11 2.1 Early history 00:14:59 2.2 Development 00:22:42 2.3 Theories 00:28:09 3 Doctrine 00:28:17 3.1 "Catholic and Reformed" 00:29:22 3.2 Guiding principles 00:30:44 3.2.1 Distinctives of Anglican belief 00:34:14 3.3 Anglican divines 00:40:07 3.4 Churchmanship 00:45:23 3.5 Sacramental doctrine and practice 00:46:45 3.5.1 Eucharistic theology 00:50:57 4 Practices 00:51:30 4.1 Book of Common Prayer 00:52:53 4.2 Worship 00:58:29 4.2.1 Eucharistic discipline 01:00:10 4.3 Divine office 01:04:11 4.3.1 "Quires and Places where they sing" 01:07:35 5 Organisation of the Anglican Communion 01:07:45 5.1 Principles of governance 01:10:53 5.2 Archbishop of Canterbury 01:12:29 5.3 Conferences 01:14:08 5.4 Ordained ministry 01:14:30 5.4.1 Episcopate 01:14:59 5.4.2 Priesthood 01:17:26 5.4.3 Diaconate 01:19:11 5.5 Laity 01:20:19 5.6 Religious orders 01:24:33 5.7 Worldwide distribution 01:27:56 5.8 Ecumenism 01:28:54 5.9 Theological diversity 01:30:15 5.9.1 Conflicts within Anglicanism 01:32:37 6 Continuing Anglican movement 01:34:56 7 Social activism 01:35:56 7.1 Working conditions and Christian socialism 01:37:11 7.2 Pacifism 01:40:49 7.3 After World War II 01:41:40 8 Ordinariates within the Roman Catholic Church Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9088250252940904 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition which has developed from the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the English Reformation.Adherents of Anglicanism are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion, which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals"). He calls the decennial Lambeth Conference, chairs the meeting of primates, and the Anglican Consultative Council. Some churches that are not part of the Anglican Communion or recognized by the Anglican Communion also call themselves Anglican, including those that are part of the Continuing Anglican movement and Anglican realignment.Anglicans base their Christian faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic Church, apostolic succession ("historic episcopate") and the writings of the Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity, having definitively declared its independence from the Holy See at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid-16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Protestantism. These reforms in the Church of England were understood by one of those most responsible for them, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and others as navigating a middle way between two of the emerging Protestant traditions, namely Lutheranism and Calvinism.In the first half of the 17th century, the Church of England and its associated Church of Ireland were presented by some Anglican divines as comprising a distinct Christian tradition, with theologies, structures, and forms of worship representing a different kind of middle way, or via media, between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism – a perspective that came to be highly influential in later theories of Anglican identity and expressed in the description of Anglicanism as "Catholic and Reformed". The degree of distinction between Protestant and Catholic tendencies within the Anglican tradition is routinely a matter of debate both within specific Anglican churches and throughout the Anglican Communion. Unique ...
Views: 10 wikipedia tts
England | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:34:23
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England 00:02:31 1 Toponymy 00:05:50 2 History 00:05:58 2.1 Prehistory and antiquity 00:10:06 2.2 Middle Ages 00:15:00 2.3 Early modern 00:19:54 2.4 Late modern and contemporary 00:23:55 3 Governance 00:24:04 3.1 Politics 00:26:46 3.2 Law 00:28:20 3.3 Regions, counties, and districts 00:31:27 4 Geography 00:31:36 4.1 Landscape and rivers 00:34:38 4.2 Climate 00:35:57 4.3 Major conurbations 00:37:02 5 Economy 00:41:54 5.1 Science and technology 00:44:35 5.2 Transport 00:47:29 6 Healthcare 00:49:22 7 Demography 00:49:31 7.1 Population 00:52:36 7.2 Language 00:55:15 7.3 Religion 00:59:02 8 Education 01:02:33 9 Culture 01:02:42 9.1 Architecture 01:05:18 9.2 Folklore 01:07:38 9.3 Cuisine 01:09:55 9.4 Visual arts 01:12:02 9.5 Literature, poetry, and philosophy 01:14:51 9.6 Performing arts 01:18:00 9.7 Cinema 01:20:22 9.8 Museums, libraries, and galleries 01:21:59 10 Sports 01:31:33 11 National symbols 01:34:05 12 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial Revolution began in 18th-century England, transforming its society into the world's first industrialised nation.England's terrain is chiefly low hills and plains, especially in central and southern England. However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills). The capital is London, which has the largest metropolitan area in both the United Kingdom and the European Union. England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.The Kingdom of England – which after 1535 included Wales – ceased being a separate sovereign state on 1 May 1707, when the Acts of Union put into effect the terms agreed in the Treaty of Union the previous year, resulting in a political union with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1801, Great Britain was united with the Kingdom of Ireland (through another Act of Union) to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1922 the Irish Free State seceded from the United Kingdom, leading to the latter being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
Views: 66 wikipedia tts
England | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:48:47
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England 00:02:55 1 Toponymy 00:06:43 2 History 00:06:52 2.1 Prehistory and antiquity 00:11:39 2.2 Middle Ages 00:17:18 2.3 Early modern 00:22:57 2.4 Late modern and contemporary 00:27:36 3 Governance 00:27:45 3.1 Politics 00:30:52 3.2 Law 00:32:40 3.3 Regions, counties, and districts 00:36:16 4 Geography 00:36:25 4.1 Landscape and rivers 00:39:55 4.2 Climate 00:41:25 4.3 Major conurbations 00:42:39 5 Economy 00:48:18 5.1 Science and technology 00:51:24 5.2 Transport 00:54:44 6 Healthcare 00:56:55 7 Demography 00:57:04 7.1 Population 01:00:37 7.2 Language 01:03:41 7.3 Religion 01:08:03 8 Education 01:12:06 9 Culture 01:12:15 9.1 Architecture 01:15:15 9.2 Folklore 01:17:57 9.3 Cuisine 01:20:34 9.4 Visual arts 01:23:00 9.5 Literature, poetry, and philosophy 01:26:15 9.6 Performing arts 01:29:53 9.7 Cinema 01:32:38 9.8 Museums, libraries, and galleries 01:34:28 10 Sports 01:45:33 11 National symbols 01:48:28 12 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8598710302989776 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial Revolution began in 18th-century England, transforming its society into the world's first industrialised nation.England's terrain is chiefly low hills and plains, especially in central and southern England. However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills). The capital is London, which has the largest metropolitan area in both the United Kingdom and the European Union. England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.The Kingdom of England – which after 1535 included Wales – ceased being a separate sovereign state on 1 May 1707, when the Acts of Union put into effect the terms agreed in the Treaty of Union the previous year, resulting in a political union with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1801, Great Britain was united with the Kingdom of Ireland (through another Act of Union) to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1922 the Irish Free State seceded from the United Kingdom, leading to the latter being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
Views: 157 wikipedia tts
Anglican | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:29:39
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Anglican Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.Adherents of Anglicanism are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion, which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals"). He calls the decennial Lambeth Conference, chairs the meeting of primates, and the Anglican Consultative Council. Some churches that are not part of the Anglican Communion also consider themselves Anglican, including those that are part of the Continuing Anglican movement and Anglican realignment.Anglicans base their Christian faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic Church, apostolic succession ("historic episcopate"), and writings of the Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity, having definitively declared its independence from the Holy See at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid-16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Protestantism. These reforms in the Church of England were understood by one of those most responsible for them, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, as navigating a middle way between two of the emerging Protestant traditions, namely Lutheranism and Calvinism.In the first half of the 17th century, the Church of England and its associated Church of Ireland were presented by some Anglican divines as comprising a distinct Christian tradition, with theologies, structures, and forms of worship representing a different kind of middle way, or via media, between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism – a perspective that came to be highly influential in later theories of Anglican identity and expressed in the description of Anglicanism as "Catholic and Reformed". The degree of distinction between Protestant and Catholic tendencies within the Anglican tradition is routinely a matter of debate both within specific Anglican churches and throughout the Anglican Communion. Unique to Anglicanism is the Book of Common Prayer, the collection of services that worshippers in most Anglican churches have used for centuries, and is thus acknowledged as one of the ties that bind the Anglican Communion together. After the American Revolution, Anglican congregations in the United States and British North America (which would later form the basis for the modern country of Canada) were each reconstituted into autonomous churches with their own bishops and self-governing structures; these were known as the American Episcopal Church and the Church of England in the Dominion of Canada. Through the expansion of the British Empire and the activity of Christian missions, this model was adopted as the model for many newly formed churches, especially in Africa, Australasia, and Asia-Pacific. In the 19th century, the term Anglicanism was coined to describe the common religious tradition of these churches; as also that of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which, though originating earlier within the Church of Scotland, had come to be recognised as sharing this common identity.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
England | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:36:55
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: England Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial Revolution began in 18th-century England, transforming its society into the world's first industrialised nation.England's terrain is chiefly low hills and plains, especially in central and southern England. However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills). The capital is London, which has the largest metropolitan area in both the United Kingdom and the European Union. England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.The Kingdom of England – which after 1535 included Wales – ceased being a separate sovereign state on 1 May 1707, when the Acts of Union put into effect the terms agreed in the Treaty of Union the previous year, resulting in a political union with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1801, Great Britain was united with the Kingdom of Ireland (through another Act of Union) to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1922 the Irish Free State seceded from the United Kingdom, leading to the latter being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
Views: 116 wikipedia tts
Alps | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:07:25
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alps 00:03:09 1 Etymology and toponymy 00:05:28 2 Geography 00:08:43 3 Passes 00:12:28 4 Geology and orogeny 00:17:36 5 "Four-thousanders" and ascents 00:19:22 6 Minerals 00:20:41 7 Glaciers 00:24:06 8 Rivers and lakes 00:26:54 9 Climate 00:30:58 10 Ecology 00:31:07 10.1 Flora 00:36:09 10.2 Fauna 00:39:51 11 History 00:40:00 11.1 Prehistory to Christianity 00:43:45 11.2 Christianity, feudalism, and Napoleonic wars 00:47:02 11.3 Exploration 00:49:57 11.4 The Romantics 00:52:01 11.5 The Nazis 00:54:24 12 Largest cities 00:55:08 13 Alpine people and culture 01:00:22 14 Tourism 01:04:15 15 Avalanche/snow-slide 01:05:22 16 Transportation Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7328362143943455 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Alps (; French: Alpes [alp]; German: Alpen [ˈalpn̩]; Italian: Alpi [ˈalpi]; Romansh: Alps; Slovene: Alpe [ˈáːlpɛ]) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe, separating Southern from Central and Western Europe and stretching approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) across eight Alpine countries (from west to east): France, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia. The mountains were formed over tens of millions of years as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided. Extreme shortening caused by the event resulted in marine sedimentary rocks rising by thrusting and folding into high mountain peaks such as Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn. Mont Blanc spans the French–Italian border, and at 4,810 m (15,781 ft) is the highest mountain in the Alps. The Alpine region area contains about a hundred peaks higher than 4,000 metres (13,000 ft). The altitude and size of the range affects the climate in Europe; in the mountains precipitation levels vary greatly and climatic conditions consist of distinct zones. Wildlife such as ibex live in the higher peaks to elevations of 3,400 m (11,155 ft), and plants such as Edelweiss grow in rocky areas in lower elevations as well as in higher elevations. Evidence of human habitation in the Alps goes back to the Palaeolithic era. A mummified man, determined to be 5,000 years old, was discovered on a glacier at the Austrian–Italian border in 1991. By the 6th century BC, the Celtic La Tène culture was well established. Hannibal famously crossed the Alps with a herd of elephants, and the Romans had settlements in the region. In 1800, Napoleon crossed one of the mountain passes with an army of 40,000. The 18th and 19th centuries saw an influx of naturalists, writers, and artists, in particular, the Romantics, followed by the golden age of alpinism as mountaineers began to ascend the peaks. The Alpine region has a strong cultural identity. The traditional culture of farming, cheesemaking, and woodworking still exists in Alpine villages, although the tourist industry began to grow early in the 20th century and expanded greatly after World War II to become the dominant industry by the end of the century. The Winter Olympic Games have been hosted in the Swiss, French, Italian, Austrian and German Alps. At present, the region is home to 14 million people and has 120 million annual visitors.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
Anglicanism | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:29:39
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Anglicanism Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.Adherents of Anglicanism are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion, which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals"). He calls the decennial Lambeth Conference, chairs the meeting of primates, and the Anglican Consultative Council. Some churches that are not part of the Anglican Communion also consider themselves Anglican, including those that are part of the Continuing Anglican movement and Anglican realignment.Anglicans base their Christian faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic Church, apostolic succession ("historic episcopate"), and writings of the Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity, having definitively declared its independence from the Holy See at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid-16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Protestantism. These reforms in the Church of England were understood by one of those most responsible for them, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, as navigating a middle way between two of the emerging Protestant traditions, namely Lutheranism and Calvinism.In the first half of the 17th century, the Church of England and its associated Church of Ireland were presented by some Anglican divines as comprising a distinct Christian tradition, with theologies, structures, and forms of worship representing a different kind of middle way, or via media, between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism – a perspective that came to be highly influential in later theories of Anglican identity and expressed in the description of Anglicanism as "Catholic and Reformed". The degree of distinction between Protestant and Catholic tendencies within the Anglican tradition is routinely a matter of debate both within specific Anglican churches and throughout the Anglican Communion. Unique to Anglicanism is the Book of Common Prayer, the collection of services that worshippers in most Anglican churches have used for centuries, and is thus acknowledged as one of the ties that bind the Anglican Communion together. After the American Revolution, Anglican congregations in the United States and British North America (which would later form the basis for the modern country of Canada) were each reconstituted into autonomous churches with their own bishops and self-governing structures; these were known as the American Episcopal Church and the Church of England in the Dominion of Canada. Through the expansion of the British Empire and the activity of Christian missions, this model was adopted as the model for many newly formed churches, especially in Africa, Australasia, and Asia-Pacific. In the 19th century, the term Anglicanism was coined to describe the common religious tradition of these churches; as also that of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which, though originating earlier within the Church of Scotland, had come to be recognised as sharing this common identity.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Anglicanism | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:29:39
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Anglicanism Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.Adherents of Anglicanism are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion, which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals"). He calls the decennial Lambeth Conference, chairs the meeting of primates, and the Anglican Consultative Council. Some churches that are not part of the Anglican Communion also consider themselves Anglican, including those that are part of the Continuing Anglican movement and Anglican realignment.Anglicans base their Christian faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic Church, apostolic succession ("historic episcopate"), and writings of the Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity, having definitively declared its independence from the Holy See at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid-16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Protestantism. These reforms in the Church of England were understood by one of those most responsible for them, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, as navigating a middle way between two of the emerging Protestant traditions, namely Lutheranism and Calvinism.In the first half of the 17th century, the Church of England and its associated Church of Ireland were presented by some Anglican divines as comprising a distinct Christian tradition, with theologies, structures, and forms of worship representing a different kind of middle way, or via media, between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism – a perspective that came to be highly influential in later theories of Anglican identity and expressed in the description of Anglicanism as "Catholic and Reformed". The degree of distinction between Protestant and Catholic tendencies within the Anglican tradition is routinely a matter of debate both within specific Anglican churches and throughout the Anglican Communion. Unique to Anglicanism is the Book of Common Prayer, the collection of services that worshippers in most Anglican churches have used for centuries, and is thus acknowledged as one of the ties that bind the Anglican Communion together. After the American Revolution, Anglican congregations in the United States and British North America (which would later form the basis for the modern country of Canada) were each reconstituted into autonomous churches with their own bishops and self-governing structures; these were known as the American Episcopal Church and the Church of England in the Dominion of Canada. Through the expansion of the British Empire and the activity of Christian missions, this model was adopted as the model for many newly formed churches, especially in Africa, Australasia, and Asia-Pacific. In the 19th century, the term Anglicanism was coined to describe the common religious tradition of these churches; as also that of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which, though originating earlier within the Church of Scotland, had come to be recognised as sharing this common identity.
Views: 19 wikipedia tts
England | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:33:40
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: England Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial Revolution began in 18th-century England, transforming its society into the world's first industrialised nation.England's terrain is chiefly low hills and plains, especially in central and southern England. However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills). The capital is London, which has the largest metropolitan area in both the United Kingdom and the European Union. England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.The Kingdom of England – which after 1535 included Wales – ceased being a separate sovereign state on 1 May 1707, when the Acts of Union put into effect the terms agreed in the Treaty of Union the previous year, resulting in a political union with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1801, Great Britain was united with the Kingdom of Ireland (through another Act of Union) to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1922 the Irish Free State seceded from the United Kingdom, leading to the latter being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
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Anglican | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:29:39
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Anglican Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.Adherents of Anglicanism are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion, which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals"). He calls the decennial Lambeth Conference, chairs the meeting of primates, and the Anglican Consultative Council. Some churches that are not part of the Anglican Communion also consider themselves Anglican, including those that are part of the Continuing Anglican movement and Anglican realignment.Anglicans base their Christian faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic Church, apostolic succession ("historic episcopate"), and writings of the Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity, having definitively declared its independence from the Holy See at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid-16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Protestantism. These reforms in the Church of England were understood by one of those most responsible for them, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, as navigating a middle way between two of the emerging Protestant traditions, namely Lutheranism and Calvinism.In the first half of the 17th century, the Church of England and its associated Church of Ireland were presented by some Anglican divines as comprising a distinct Christian tradition, with theologies, structures, and forms of worship representing a different kind of middle way, or via media, between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism – a perspective that came to be highly influential in later theories of Anglican identity and expressed in the description of Anglicanism as "Catholic and Reformed". The degree of distinction between Protestant and Catholic tendencies within the Anglican tradition is routinely a matter of debate both within specific Anglican churches and throughout the Anglican Communion. Unique to Anglicanism is the Book of Common Prayer, the collection of services that worshippers in most Anglican churches have used for centuries, and is thus acknowledged as one of the ties that bind the Anglican Communion together. After the American Revolution, Anglican congregations in the United States and British North America (which would later form the basis for the modern country of Canada) were each reconstituted into autonomous churches with their own bishops and self-governing structures; these were known as the American Episcopal Church and the Church of England in the Dominion of Canada. Through the expansion of the British Empire and the activity of Christian missions, this model was adopted as the model for many newly formed churches, especially in Africa, Australasia, and Asia-Pacific. In the 19th century, the term Anglicanism was coined to describe the common religious tradition of these churches; as also that of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which, though originating earlier within the Church of Scotland, had come to be recognised as sharing this common identity.
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Aeolian Islands | Wikipedia audio article
 
11:57
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Aeolian Islands Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Aeolian Islands () (Italian: Isole Eolie, pronounced [ˈiːzole eˈɔːlje], Sicilian: Ìsuli Eoli, Greek: Αιολίδες Νήσοι, Aiolides Nisoi) are a volcanic archipelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea north of Sicily, named after the demigod of the winds Aeolus. The islands' inhabitants are known as Aeolians (Italian: Eoliani). The Aeolian Islands are a popular tourist destination in the summer and attract up to 200,000 visitors annually. The largest island is Lipari and the islands are sometimes referred to as the Lipari Islands or Lipari group. The other islands include Vulcano, Salina, Stromboli, Filicudi, Alicudi, Panarea and Basiluzzo.
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Anglicanism | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:31:31
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Anglicanism 00:03:14 1 Terminology 00:05:24 1.1 Definition 00:08:34 2 Anglican identity 00:08:43 2.1 Early history 00:12:55 2.2 Development 00:20:13 2.3 Theories 00:25:01 3 Doctrine 00:25:09 3.1 "Catholic and Reformed" 00:26:42 3.2 Guiding principles 00:27:56 3.2.1 Distinctives of Anglican belief 00:31:03 3.3 Anglican divines 00:36:14 3.4 Churchmanship 00:40:53 3.5 Sacramental doctrine and practice 00:42:06 3.5.1 Eucharistic theology 00:44:34 4 Practices 00:45:05 4.1 Book of Common Prayer 00:46:20 4.2 Worship 00:51:16 4.2.1 Eucharistic discipline 00:52:46 4.3 Divine office 00:56:21 4.3.1 "Quires and Places where they sing" 00:59:22 5 Organisation of the Anglican Communion 00:59:33 5.1 Principles of governance 01:02:20 5.2 Archbishop of Canterbury 01:03:47 5.3 Conferences 01:05:15 5.4 Ordained ministry 01:05:35 5.4.1 Episcopate 01:06:02 5.4.2 Priesthood 01:08:13 5.4.3 Diaconate 01:09:44 5.5 Laity 01:10:46 5.6 Religious orders 01:14:32 5.7 Worldwide distribution 01:17:32 5.8 Ecumenism 01:18:24 5.9 Theological diversity 01:19:36 5.9.1 Conflicts within Anglicanism 01:21:42 6 Continuing Anglican movement 01:23:47 7 Social activism 01:24:41 7.1 Working conditions and Christian socialism 01:25:48 7.2 Pacifism 01:29:03 7.3 After World War II 01:29:49 8 Ordinariates within the Roman Catholic Church Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.Adherents of Anglicanism are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion, which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals"). He calls the decennial Lambeth Conference, chairs the meeting of primates, and the Anglican Consultative Council. Some churches that are not part of the Anglican Communion also consider themselves Anglican, including those that are part of the Continuing Anglican movement and Anglican realignment.Anglicans base their Christian faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic Church, apostolic succession ("historic episcopate"), and writings of the Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity, having definitively declared its independence from the Holy See at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement. Many of the new Anglican formularies of the mid-16th century corresponded closely to those of contemporary Protestantism. These reforms in the Church of England were understood by one of those most responsible for them, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and others as navigating a middle way between two of the emerging Protestant traditions, namely Lutheranism and Calvinism.. Neither of these would be embraced. In the first half of the 17th century, the Church of England and its associated Church of Ireland were presented by some Anglican divines as comprising a distinct Christian tradition, with theologies, structures, and forms of worship representing a different kind of middle way, or via media, between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism – a perspective that came to be highly influential in later theories of Anglican identity and expressed in the description of Anglicanism as "Catholic and Reformed". The degree of distinction between Protestant and Catholic tendencies within the Anglican tradition is routinely a matter of debate both within specific Anglican churches and throughout the Anglican Communion. Unique to Anglicanism is the Book of Common Prayer, the collection of services that worshippers in most Anglican churches have used for centuries, and is thus acknowledged as one of the ties that ...
Views: 21 wikipedia tts