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Coal Miners Are Dying Of Black Lung — A Kentucky Law Could Make It Harder To Claim Benefits (HBO)
 
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Kentucky is at the center of what experts are calling the worst black lung epidemic on record. But instead of making it easier for miners to get access to health care, Kentucky’s lawmakers passed a law that may soon hinder miners’ ability to obtain workers’ compensation benefits. The new law, which goes into effect on July 14th, bars federally certified radiologists from assessing coal miners’ X-rays in state black lung workers’ compensation claims. Instead, the state will require that only pulmonologists, physicians whose focus is lung disease, be allowed to judge X-rays for benefit claims. Right now, there are only 11 doctors in Kentucky who are certified to examine X-rays for state benefits claims, and the new law will cut that number down to five. Read more: http://bit.ly/2LbdZQ5 Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo
Views: 381697 VICE News
Faces of Black Lung
 
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Faces of Black Lung - Health and Human Services 2008 - NIOSH 2008-131 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Each year, approximately 1,000 miners in the U.S. die from coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or 'black lung disease,' a preventable illness caused by exposure to coal mine dust. The video features two miners who share their stories and provide insight on how their lives have changed due to this devastating disease.
Views: 8994 PublicResourceOrg
Discovering A Hidden Epidemic of Severe Black Lung Disease | "Coal's Deadly Dust" | FRONTLINE
 
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Two years ago, a radiologist in Kentucky began seeing an overwhelming number of coal miners with the most severe form of black lung disease. It would lead to the biggest disease clusters ever documented. Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW In “Coal’s Deadly Dust,” FRONTLINE and NPR investigate the rise of severe black lung disease among coal miners, and how it could have been prevented. In the above excerpt from a documentary that airs Jan. 22, NPR Correspondent Howard Berkes retraces how Brandon Crum, a radiologist working in Kentucky, alerted federal researchers to a surge in cases of coal miners with severe black lung disease, which is incurable and fatal. The documentary reveals just how large the epidemic has become, and investigates the mining industry and government’s failure to protect coal miners. Watch “Coal's Deadly Dust,” starting Tues., Jan. 22 at 10/9c: https://to.pbs.org/2Rh2NYa Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline Google+: https://plus.google.com/+frontline/posts FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.
Big Money, Black Lung and Doctors for the Coal Companies
 
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Some coal miners told their illness didn't come from years in the mines; benefits blocked.
Views: 11726 ABC News
Dissected Black Lung, Lung Disease and Coal Power
 
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According to the United Mine Workers Of America, black lung is contracted by “prolonged breathing of coal mine dust.” It is an incurable, yet preventable disease. In 1969, the U.S. Congress implemented coal industry reforms to help eradicate the disease, which has since fallen from inflicting 7.7 percent of coal miners between 1968-1980 to 2.6 during the first decade of this century. China now finds itself at an earlier junction in this story, as coal production has surged but health and safety reforms and oversight are lagging. A 2013 study by Shantou University Medical College in southern China found that about six percent of Chinese coal workers had black lung between 2001 and 2011. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/GreatestMedicalCaseStudies/?sub_confirmation=1 Support us by doing your bookmarking our link and using it every time you shop with Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/?tag=wrestling911c-20 It won’t cost you a thing. Blackhead King Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7rGRoZ14FCMqG9UYi2lH9Q?sub_confirmation=1 World's Largest Cysts Channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=govc2JyJAkY&list=TLHORNQqIgtwRddZlZiLq3VdWKltXSZZ58 Massive Boil Drained: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZYw7shk8rQ Ovarian Cyst Bursting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGQh0LXuy0U Black Salve Cancer Treatment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXFqdtGLZTw World’s Worst Spider Bites: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joehA-1181A Please do not take any medical advice from this YouTube channel. Although we enjoy educational discussion, this is an entertainment channel. If you have ANY medical problems, you should seek professional medical help from a doctor at a regulated medical facility. Use this channel for educational and entertainment purposes, not for medical advice. For a cyst or popping clip you want us to feature? Email us here: [email protected] Reddit Freaky Medical: http://www.reddit.com/r/freakymedical Twitter Medical: https://twitter.com/ASBoxOffice Also check out World’s Greatest Animals: https://www.youtube.com/c/worldsgreatestanimals?sub_confirmation=1
Black Lung Disease Coal Dust Occupational Disease 1980 MSHA
 
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In the last decade, over 10,000 miners have died of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or what is commonly called black lung disease.1 Black lung disease, which is caused by inhaling coal mine dust, results in scarring of the lungs and emphysema, shortness of breath, disability, and premature death. While the prevalence of black lung disease had decreased by about 90% from 1969 to 1995 following the enactment of the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act, the downward trend of this disease in coal miners has stopped. Since 1995, the prevalence of black lung cases has more than doubled. Many current underground miners (some as young as in their 30s) are developing severe and advanced cases. Identification of advanced cases among miners under age 50 is of particular concern, as they were exposed to coal-mine dust in the years after implementation of the disease prevention measures mandated by the 1969 federal legislation. An increased risk of pneumoconiosis has also been associated with work in certain mining jobs, in smaller mines, in several geographic areas, and among contract miners. For more information, go to the NIOSH Science Blog at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/blog/nsb081808_blacklung.html . This is clipped from the 1980 Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) film, Coal Dust: Hazards and Controls.
Views: 22633 markdcatlin
Coal Dust Exposure & Black Lung Disease
 
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Prolonged exposure to respirable coal mine dust can cause lung diseases, such as coal workers' pneumoconiosis, emphysema and progressive massive fibrosis. These diseases, collectively referred to as black lung, can lead to permanent disability and even death. According to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates, more than 76,000 miners have died since 1968 as a result of the disease, and more than $45 billion in federal compensation benefits have been paid out to coal miners disabled by black lung and their survivors. Evidence indicates that miners, including young miners, are continually being diagnosed with the disease. Although some miners never develop the disease, others may develop the early signs after less than 10 years of mining experience according to NIOSH. In its early stages, called simple pneumoconiosis, the disease may not prevent workers from carrying on most normal activities. In some miners, the disease progresses from simple to complicated pneumoconiosis, a condition called progressive massive fibrosis. People exposed to coal dusts that have shortness of breath, cough or any other health concerns, are advised by NIOSH to seek medical attention right away as pneumoconiosis may be detected on chest x-rays. Unfortunately, there is no cure for the damage that coal dust does to one’s lungs. Preventing black lung needs to be among the highest priorities for protecting the health of coal miners. The Federal Black Lung Benefits Program provides payments and medical treatment to coal miners who are totally disabled from black lung arising from their employment in or around the nation’s coal mines. These are just a few things to know about exposure risks to coal dust and black lung disease. To learn more about this or other occupational, air quality, environmental, health and safety issues, please visit the websites shown below. Clark Seif Clark http://www.csceng.com EMSL Analytical, Inc. http://www.emsl.com Indoor Environmental Consultants, Inc. http://www.iecinc.net LA Testing http://www.latesting.com Zimmetry Environmental http://www.zimmetry.com Healthy Indoors Magazine http://www.iaq.net Hudson Douglas Public Adjusters http://HudsonDouglasPublicAdjusters.com
Views: 4395 Paul Cochrane
Deadly Black Lung Disease Rises Among Coal Miners
 
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Despite legislation meant to enact safety practices to prevent coal miners from getting black lung disease, workers are still being exposed to high levels of dust. Hari Sreenivasan talks to NPR reporter Howard Berkes about his investigation into the increased cases of the disease.
Views: 2563 PBS NewsHour
AP Short Hard News Story- Black Lung Benefits Denied
 
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Original Air Date: May 19, 2014 Reporter: Don Dare http://wate.com/2014/05/19/scott-county-former-coal-miner-fights-for-black-lung-disease-benefits/
American Miners Getting Black Lung
 
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The dust was so thick that Justin Greenwell could barely see what was in front of him. A 29-year-old miner, Greenwell had grown accustomed to working in the coal dust below ground in the Parkway Mine in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. Yet the prevalence of the dust in the air bothered Greenwell more and more. He'd labored for seven years in the mines, and already he was experiencing shortness of breath when he worked on his farm on the weekends... Read More At: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/29/black-lung-disease-kentucky-coal-dust_n_5368878.html Clip from the Friday, May 30th 2014 edition of The Kyle Kulinski Show, which airs live on Blog Talk Radio and Secular Talk Radio monday - friday 4-6pm Eastern. Check out our website - and become a member - at: http://www.SecularTalkRadio.com Listen to the Live Show or On Demand archive at: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/kylekulinski Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/kylekulinski Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SecularTalk Friends Of SecularTalk: http://www.facebook.com/beastofreason AMAZON LINK: (Bookmark this link to support the show for free!!!) http://www.amazon.com/?tag=seculacom-20
Views: 4475 Secular Talk
Coal miners file claims for Black Lung Disease
 
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According to the American Journal of Public Health, one in five working coal miners in central Appalachia will suffer from the coal miner's disease, black lung. Wednesday in Beckley, nearly 100 former coal miners lined up to file claims for this debilitating disease.
Views: 23 59 News
Coal black lung disease Qld: RTI shows a workers compensation claim accepted in 2007
 
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15/08/2016 A search of Queensland workers compensation records show that there was at least one case of black lung accepted before the official 're-emergence' of the coal miners disease in 2015.
Views: 130 Greenshack Dotinfo
Leading Voices in Public Health - Black Lung
 
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"The resurgence of black lung disease in Appalachian coal miners" September 26, 2017 David Blackley, James Crum, Scott Laney
Coal miners have been inhaling deadly silica dust for decades. Now they're dying
 
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For decades, coal miners have been inhaling silica dust on the job. The extremely fine particles, generated when the quartz-rich limestone surrounding coal seams is cut, lodge in the lungs, obstructing respiration. According to a Frontline/NPR report, both the industry and the government understood the hazard for decades but did little to contain it. Howard Berkes of NPR joins John Yang. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe
Views: 3967 PBS NewsHour
Rate of black lung disease among miners may be 10 times higher than reported
 
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Lung disease is a well-known deadly consequence of working in the coal industry. But a new NPR study finds miners are suffering from the most advanced form of the disease at a rate ten times higher than the government has reported. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with NPR's Howard Berkes about the causes of this late-stage lung disease, possibilities for treatment and why it's been direly underestimated.
Views: 2858 PBS NewsHour
First case of Black Lung disease from miner who worked in open cut coal mine
 
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11/10/2016 Miner Paul Head has been diagnosed with Black Lung disease after working in an open cut coal mine for 30 years.
Views: 385 Qldaah
Thousands could have black lung disease from working in Qld coal mines
 
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3/03/Unions are predicting 16 per cent of current and retired coal mine workers will have black lung as the Department of Mines admits hundred of thousands of X-rays have not processed.
Views: 1470 Qldaah
Coal country afraid Trump will repeal black lung benefits...
 
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Former coal miners and their families in Kentucky, who voted for Donald Trump, are worried that the President-elect will repeal Obamacare, and the benefits for black lung that come with it.
Views: 25062 CNN Business
Black Lung Disease Comes Storming Back in Coal Country
 
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Thank for Watching.! Please Like Share And SUBSCRIBE.! #healthcare #familyhealth #nutritionnews #animation Black Lung Disease Comes Storming Back in Coal Country Federal investigators this month identified the largest cluster of advanced black lung cases ever of... https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/02/22/climate/black-lung-resurgence.html
Views: 27 Health Care
Black lung disease had reappeared a decade ago
 
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14/10/2016 16 coal miners have been confirmed to have black lung disease as a parliamentary hearing gets under way in Queensland.
Views: 25 Qldaah
Fears port & power station workers may have contracted black lung disease
 
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14/03/2017 Black lung disease inquiry hears hundreds of miners, port workers & power station workers may be infected with the disease.
Views: 52 David Marler
One Breath At A Time; A Coal Miner's Perspective on Black Lung
 
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Gary Hairston, a resident of Beckley, West Virginia shares his story of his life as a coal miner. For more on this story check out Lori Kersey's article in the Monday, Jan. 16, 2017 edition of the Charleston Gazette-Mail. http://wvgazettemail.com
Federal black lung fund in danger of drying up
 
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(19 Mar 2019) Former coal miner John Robinson's bills for black lung treatments run $4,000 a month, but the federal fund he depends on to help cover them is being drained of money because of inaction by Congress and the Trump administration. Amid the turmoil of the government shutdown this winter, a tax on coal that helps pay for the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund was cut sharply Jan. 1 and never restored, potentially saving coal operators hundreds of millions of dollars a year. With cash trickling into the fund at less than half its usual rate, budget officials estimate that by the middle of 2020 there won't be enough money to fully cover the fund's benefit payments. As a surge of black lung disease scars miners' lungs at younger ages than ever, Robinson worries not only about cuts to his benefits, but that younger miners won't get any coverage. "Coal miners sort of been put on the back burner, thrown to the side," Robinson said recently, sitting at his kitchen table in the small Virginia town of Coeburn, near the Kentucky border. "They just ain't being done right." President Donald Trump, who vowed to save the coal industry during the 2016 campaign, has repeatedly praised miners. At an August rally in West Virginia filled with miners in hard hats, he called them "great people. Brave people. I don't know how the hell you do that. You guys have a lot of courage." Trump made no mention of restoring the 2018 tax rate in his proposed budget released in mid-March. The White House said in a statement Tuesday that "President Trump and this administration have always supported the mining industry by prioritizing deregulation and less Washington interference." Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, whose home state of Kentucky is third in the nation in coal production, told reporters in October the tax rate would "be taken care of before we get into an expiration situation." That didn't happen. McConnell spokesman Robert Steurer didn't repeat that pledge this week; rather, he wrote in an email, "benefits provided through the Black Lung Disability Fund continue to be provided at regular levels" and that McConnell "continues to prioritize maintaining and protecting the benefits." Trump and McConnell have reaped large contributions from the coal industry, according to the political money website Open Secrets. Trump received more than $276,000 during the 2016 presidential election from political action committees and individuals affiliated with coal companies. His inaugural committee received $1 million from Joe Craft, CEO of Alliance Resource Partners in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and $300,000 from the Murray Energy Corporation, the nation's largest privately-owned coal-mining company. McConnell received more than $297,000 in coal industry donations since 2014, when he was last up for election. Congress established the trust fund in 1978. The fund provides health benefits and payments to about 25,000 retired miners. Most worked for companies that are now bankrupt. Many, including Robinson, struggle to breathe as their lungs are slowly stifled by tiny dust and particles trapped there. Robinson was 47 when he was diagnosed, part of a wave of younger miners that doctors and experts say have been swept up in a new black lung epidemic in Appalachia. Robinson, now 53, and others who depend on the fund are disappointed in McConnell and other leaders Dr. Brandon Crum has watched that epidemic unfold at his Pikeville, Kentucky, radiology clinic. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4174fccaed98fed6485a1bd5b63af0dd
Views: 166 AP Archive
Black Lung Disease Comes Storming Back in Coal Country
 
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Black Lung Disease Comes Storming Back in Coal Country
Views: 65 Health Care 24h
Former coal miner, Michael Whitten, on strip mining, unions, black lung disease
 
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Michael Whitten worked in West Virginia's coal industry for 8 years, but his family has been impacted by coal for generations. This is part of his story, told in June of 2017.
Black Lung - coal miners speak out
 
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For decades it was believed that Black Lung disease (coal workers pneumoconiosis) had been eradicated. But in 2015, the first Australian coal miner in 30 years was diagnosed with the deadly disease. How has it happened, and what is being done about it?
Views: 115 CFMEUMINING
Dr Bob Cohen explains black lung
 
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Dr Bob Cohen of the University of Illinois explains, in simple language, the variety of diseases caused by mine dust, including black lung and silicosis
Views: 187 CFMEUMINING
Black Lungs: Hidden Tolls of Coal Mining (Trailer)
 
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Coal makes up 70% of Chinas primary energy consumption and has powered its economic engine for decades. But there are hidden costs behind this dirty fuel, both to human health and to the environment. At least a quarter million Chinese have died from coal mine accidents in China since 1949, according to official statistics. Those who do survive are hardly unscathed. Many suffer from occupational hazards like the fatal black lung disease and maimed limbs. Some estimates put the external environmental cost from coal mining at 7% of Chinas gross domestic product. In short, what consumers pay for electricity and other forms of energy in China is hugely subsidized and does not account for these true, often hideous, costs associated with the complete cycle of coal usage. When miners lungs turn black, it is a grim reminder that coal is much more than just a source of energy. For more info: http://sites.asiasociety.org/chinagreen/feature-black-lungs/
Views: 4241 Asia Society
Joe Madison Talks About Black Lung Disease Protection Being Cut Back for Coal Miners
 
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Joseph Madison, alternatively known as "The Black Eagle" or "Madison", is an American radio talk-show host and activist stopped by Sway In The Morning with his wife Sherry Madison. Subscribe to Sway’s Universe for More http://bit.ly/SubscribeSU Watch the Best of Sway In The Morning http://bit.ly/BestOfSITM Check out More From Sway’s Universe http://swaysuniverse.com http://twitter.com/swaysuniverse http://instagram.com/swaysuniverse http://facebook.com/swaysuniverse
Views: 4551 SWAY'S UNIVERSE
Coal Mining Disease Re-emerges
 
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Mollye Borrows talks about the alarming re-emergence of black lung disease. FOLLOW Mike Papantonio on Twitter: https://twitter.com/americaslawyer FOLLOW America’s Lawyer on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/rtamericaslawyer Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
Views: 4266 RT America
Black Lung Disease
 
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www.bit.ly/niosh-spirometer See if your spirometer is compliant by taking a spirometer survey. According to the United States Department of Labor, more than 76,000 miners have died from complications due to Black Lung Disease (Coalworker's Pneumoconiosis). After Black Lung cases began increasing for the first time in 30 years, MSHA released Phase III of the respirable dust rule in 2016. NIOSH, in turn, expanded its national program of health surveillance for coal miners to offset the negative health trend by updating their spirometer device requirements. Copyright 2018 Benson Medical Instruments Music: "Colorless Aura" by Kai Engler
Faces of Black Lung Disease - Documentary Film
 
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This US Department of Health and Human Services documentary film examines the stories of two miners whose lives have been affected by black lung disease, in which exposure to coal dust interferes with lung function.
Views: 858 The Federal File
Fund for coal miners with black lung disease is in dire financial trouble, report says
 
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Story highlightsThe Black Lung Disability Trust Fund pays medical bills for coal miners too sick to workA report finds that by 2050, the fund might have to borrow more than $15 billion to stay afloat (CNN)A US government fund that helps coal miners sickened with black lung disease is beset by billions of dollars in debt, according to a government watchdog report obtained by CNN. Now, some congressional leaders worry the miners could lose their benefits.More than 14,000 miners depend on the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund to pay their medical bills and help with other expenses when they're too sick to work.The report from the US Government Accountability Office finds that by 2050, the trust fund might have to borrow more than $15 billion to stay afloat.CNN obtained the report before its official release at noon Monday."If we do nothing, the debt will explode," said Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Virginia, one of the members of Congress who requested the report from the accountability office. "Once [the fund] becomes clearly unsustainable, there will be pressure to cut benefits."Read MoreThe Black Lung Disability Trust Fund is supposed to be funded by a tax on coal companies, but in its nearly 40-year history, that tax has almost never been enough to cover the fund's expenditures, according to the GAO report.The fund has had to borrow from American taxpayers to make up the shortfall. In fiscal year 2017 alone, the trust fund borrowed about $1.3 billion from the US Department of the Treasury. Overall, the fund is currently $4.3 billion in debt to taxpayers.The fund has not always paid back what it owes taxpayers.In 2008, the government forgave $6.5 billion in debt, or more than half of what was owed, and refinanced the rest of the debt at favorable interest rates.According to the GAO report, the fund's financial situation is expected to get worse for two major reasons.First, black lung beneficiaries could increase in the near future because more and more miners are being diagnosed with black lung disease. Doctors recently identified the largest cluster ever: 416 cases of advanced black lung disease at three clinics in Virginia.Second, the tax on coal companies is scheduled to be cut by 55% at the end of this year, a long-planned reduction. President Trump's budget does not call for the cut to be canceled. Congress hasn't taken any action to address the cut, either.The 'vicious toll' of black lung diseaseAll of this has Kenny Fleming very worried.Fleming was a coal miner in Kentucky for 35 years, sometimes working from 5 in the morning until 7 at night.Three years ago, he was diagnosed with black lung disease, which turns miners' lungs black and stiff with coal dust. The process is usually relatively slow, but in the past 20 years or so, miners have developed aggressive cases. Their lungs scar up more quickly, and many miners develop large masses of scar tissue and nodules, according to Dr. Robert Cohen, professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Nor
Views: 15 Health & Fitness
It Took This Coal Miner 14 Years To Secure Black Lung Benefits. How Come?
 
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Despite the federal Black Lung Benefits Act, 70 percent of benefit awards are challenged by an industry that hates to lose or pay. Read the story here: https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07092017/coal-company-fights-black-lung-medical-benefits-appalachian-miner Part of Choke Hold, a series of stories by InsideClimate News that examines the fossil fuel industry's fight against climate policy, science and clean energy. Video by Lathan Gourmas Reporting by David Hasemyer
Views: 1085 InsideClimate News
Senate inquiry to begin into black lung disease in Qld coal miners
 
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12/02/2016 More people expected to be diagnosed with black lung disease from working in Queensland coal mines. A Federal Senate inquiry is scheduled to begin in May 2016.
Views: 92 Qldaah
The Law Works - Black Lung
 
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Black lung disease was thought by some to be a disease of the past. It is not. It is not treatable or curable. Federal law says that a coal miner should work his or her entire life without incurring any disability from black lung. Why isn’t that happening? We’ll talk about black lung on this episode of The Law Works.
Faces of Black Lung
 
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As of 2008, when this video was released, approximately 1,000 miners in the U.S. died yearly from coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or 'black lung disease,' a preventable illness caused by exposure to coal mine dust. The video entitled, 'Faces of Black Lung' features two miners who share their stories and provide insight on how their lives have changed due to this devastating disease.
Views: 826 NIOSH
NIOSH Faces of Black Lung Part 1
 
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Each year, approximately 1,000 miners in the U.S. die from coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or 'black lung disease,' a preventable illness caused by exposure to coal mine dust. The video features two miners who share their stories and provide insight on how their lives have changed due to this devastating disease. To order a free copy of this DVD please contact NIOSH Anita Wolfe at [email protected]
Views: 4893 NIOSH
WVU Expert Reports Uptick In Black Lung Disease
 
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A West Virginia expert says while some think the coal industry is declining, something else is rising -- the number of black lung cases; KDKA's Jon Delano reports.
Views: 60 CBS Pittsburgh
Preventing workplace lung diseases through dust control systems in mining
 
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Dust is a major health hazard in mining and other work environments. Dust control systems in mines can prevent dust related diseases like black lung, silicosis and . Ventilation systems, water sprayers and dust collection devices like scrubbers are part of dust control systems. If dust control doesn't work at the workplace, repiration, protection systems are used to prevent repiratory disease. Visible and invisible silica dust. As we move well into the 21st century, and due to improvements in industrial hygiene practices and dust control measures, we will probably be seeing less of the traditional pneumoconiosIs in the industrialized countries. We will, however, start seeing more of the immunologically mediated disorders related to more modern technologies, such as hard metal diseases and chronic beryllium disease. Silica dust through roof bolting coal dust in long wall mining. In this chapter, we debate a few of the traditional dust exposures (asbestos, silica, coal, and hard metals) and the illnesses they produce. Special stress is given to beryllium-induced lung disease because of its emerging role and the need for increased awareness to recognize persons at risk based on recent advances in the understandance of its pathophysiology. Use of ventilation and filtration systems to prevent exposure to dust particles in the air ways to the lungs.
Views: 1197 Dust Control Systems
Coal's Deadly Dust | Preview | FRONTLINE
 
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FRONTLINE and NPR investigate the rise of severe black lung disease among coal miners, and the failure to respond. Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW This joint investigation reveals the biggest disease clusters ever documented, and how the industry and the government failed to protect miners. Also in this two-part hour, FRONTLINE presents a report from Yemen. Watch "Coal's Deadly Dust" starting January 22, 2019: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/coals-deadly-dust/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline Google+: https://plus.google.com/+frontline/posts FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, the Heising-Simons Foundation and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.
Black Lung Disease Compensation Better Times A-Comin 1980 USDOL Employment Standards Administration
 
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This 1980 film was made for the US Department of Labor's Employment Standards Administration (ESA) which administers the Federal Black Lung Disability Trust Fund. The film, narrated by Cliff Robertson, looks at the life of coal miners in a small town in the United States. We learn that federal legislation regarding black lung disease improved the lives of the inhabitants of the town. In the last decade, over 10,000 miners have died of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, or what is commonly called black lung disease. The disease is also known by Black lung disease, which is caused by inhaling coal mine dust, results in scarring of the lungs and emphysema, shortness of breath, disability, and premature death. Like all occupational diseases, black lung is man-made and can be prevented. In fact, the U.S. Congress ordered black lung to be eradicated from the coal industry in 1969. While the prevalence of black lung disease had decreased by about 90% from 1969 to 1995 following the enactment of the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act, the downward trend of this disease in coal miners has stopped. Since 1995, the prevalence of black lung cases has more than doubled. Many current underground miners (some as young as in their 30s) are developing severe and advanced cases. Identification of advanced cases among miners under age 50 is of particular concern, as they were exposed to coal-mine dust in the years after implementation of the disease prevention measures mandated by the 1969 federal legislation. An increased risk of pneumoconiosis has also been associated with work in certain mining jobs, in smaller mines, in several geographic areas, and among contract miners. For more information, go to the NIOSH Science Blog at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/blog/nsb081808_blacklung.html . Late in 1968, a number of miners organized the West Virginia Black Lung Association, which successfully led a campaign to introduce a bill in the 1969 session of the West Virginia legislature making coal workers' pneumoconiosis a compensable disease. The compensation bill was quickly made a major issue by the Black Lung Association and militant miners in February when the legislation ran into opposition from the coal-operator-dominated legislature. Most of the 40,000 miners in West Virginia walked out of the mines, and a large number of them marched on the state capitol in Charleston demanding passage of the bill. Three weeks later, after the Governor signed the bill, the miners went back to work. This was one of the largest and longest strikes ever on the single issue of occupational health. This strike played a vital role in the ultimate passage of similar legislation in three more states in 1969 and one in 1971, and the enactment of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. In this Act, Congress established the black lung benefits program, the first and only federal compensation statute to compensate victims of occupational diseases. In 1977, amendments established a Black Lung Disability Trust Fund to provide compensation to miners whose employers no longer existed, financed by taxes paid by all coal operators. They also made coal companies directly responsible for compensation and medical costs for black lung victims that had worked for them. For more information, visit the United Mine Workers Union website at http://www.umwa.org/?q=content/black-lung.
Views: 953 markdcatlin
Black lung disease: 8 of 12 Qld underground coal mines told to fix dust levels
 
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14/01/2016 It's been revealed Queensland coal mines are exposing workers to dangerous dust levels as authorities try to tackle a return of the deadly black lung disease.
Views: 74 Qldaah
Coal Miners Struggles with Black Lung
 
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Dr. Donald Rasmussen, MD speaks on the difficulties of coal miners who face Black Lung. Given at the Pipestem, WV conference on June 5th, 2015
Gov’t’s black lung fund being de-funded
 
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Black lung disease—which afflicted coal miners decades ago—has re-emerged at rates never before seen. This while the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund, funded by a tax on the coal industry, is being drained. Legal journalist Mollye Barrows sits down with RT America’s Manila Chan to discuss. Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America #InQuestion #RTAmerica #QuestionMore
Views: 2079 RT America
Inquiry into black lung disease hears from retired miners on lax safety standards
 
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4/11/2016 There are now 16 confirmed cases of black lung disease in Queensland.
Views: 29 Qldaah