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Can conservation save our ocean? | The Economist
 
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The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2G3TH9d The crew of this ship is on a mission to try and save one of the most endangered sea creatures on the planet. They’re in the middle of a marine protected area in Mexico - a conservation zone where certain types of fishing are banned. Local fishermen are poaching a species of fish that is so highly prized in China, they can make tens of thousands of dollars in just one night. With ocean life under threat from overfishing, pollution and climate change, could marine protected areas be the answer? Near the Mexican fishing town of San Felipe, on the The Upper Gulf of California... Conservation group, Sea Shepherd is working with the authorities to help enforce a Marine Protected Area - or MPA. A designated section of ocean to be conserved, managed and protected. Maintaining rich, diverse ecosystems is key for the health of the Ocean - and ultimately the survival of humanity. But ocean life is under threat. From plants to micro-organisms and animals, species are disappearing forever. Marine Biologist Patricia Gandolfo and the rest of the Sea Shepherd crew are here to stop poachers. Caught up in the nets of the criminal gangs and local fishermen is one particularly rare porpoise - the Vaquita. Worldwide there are thousands of sea species currently threatened with extinction. Losing just one species from the food chain can have a disastrous effect on an entire ecosystem. After it’s sold on, the Totoaba’s swim bladder can fetch up to $100,000 a kilo in China, where it’s prized for its medicinal properties. Critics disapprove of Sea Shepherds use of direct-action tactics in some of their campaigns, but in the Gulf of California, their presence is welcomed by the Mexican government. Globally, the fishing industry employs 260 million people, but many more subsistence fishermen depend on the ocean for their income. Local fisherman here claim protecting the ocean has limited how they can fish, destroying their way of life. Yet doing nothing may ultimately present more of a threat to their livelihoods. Currently Marine Protected Areas make up only 3.6% of the world’s ocean but a growing number of scientists are calling for 30% to be protected by 2030. Cabo Pulmo now has a thriving eco-tourism and diving industry. The environmental rewards provided by the MPA to the local community have been valued at millions of dollars a year - Far more than they ever made from fishing. The ocean is facing its greatest ever challenge - overfishing, pollution and climate change are all threatening the health of a resource on which the whole world depends. Marine protected areas can come in many forms. But if they are to be effective, they must align the need for conservation with the needs of those who depend on the ocean for survival. In order to avoid disaster–and to ensure a sustainable supply of fish for the future–far more of our ocean needs urgent protection. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2G4unAb Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2G3AV1E Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2G3TJOn Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2G5cEIU Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2G43hZY
Views: 73375 The Economist
5 Human Impacts on the Environment: Crash Course Ecology #10
 
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Hank gives the run down on the top five ways humans are negatively impacting the environment and having detrimental effects on the valuable ecosystem services which a healthy biosphere provides. Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse T*mbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Table of Contents Ecosystem Services 00:51 The Importance of Biodiversity 04:07 Deforestation 06:42 Desertification 06:49 Global Warming 07:59 Invasive Species 08:51 Overharvesting 09:20 Crash Course/SciShow videos referenced in this episode: Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2D7hZpIYlCA Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leHy-Y_8nRs Ecological Succession: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZKIHe2LDP8 Climate Change: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Jxs7lR8ZI Invasive Species: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDOwTXobJ3k Food Shortage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPLJP84xL9A References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3n5P Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1281559 CrashCourse
Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic
 
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What causes climate change (also known as global warming)? And what are the effects of climate change? Learn the human impact and consequences of climate change for the environment, and our lives. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic https://youtu.be/G4H1N_yXBiA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 850483 National Geographic
The Dead Sea, Israel - This is not another sea.  it's something completely different.
 
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Zahi Shaked A tour guide in Israel and his camera. +972 54 6905522 [email protected] "Dead Sea" , "Sea of Salt", also called the Salt Sea, is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east, and Israel and the West Bank to the west. Its surface and shores are 422 metres (1,385 ft) below sea level,[2] the lowest elevation on the Earth's surface on dry land. The Dead Sea is 378 m (1,240 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. It is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, with 33.7% salinity. Only Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond) have a higher salinity. It is 8.6 times more salty than the ocean.[4] This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers. People also use the salt and the minerals from the Dead Sea to create cosmetics and herbal sachets. In 2009, 1.2 million foreign tourists visited on the Israeli side. The sea has a density of 1.24kg/L, making swimming difficult.The Dead Sea is an endorheic lake located in the Jordan Rift Valley, a geographic feature formed by the Dead Sea Transform (DST). This left lateral-moving transform fault lies along the tectonic plate boundary between the African Plate and the Arabian Plate. It runs between the East Anatolian Fault zone in Turkey and the northern end of the Red Sea Rift offshore of the southern tip of Sinai. The Jordan River is the only major water source flowing into the Dead Sea, although there are small perennial springs under and around the Dead Sea, creating pools and quicksand pits along the edges.[7] There are no outlet streams. Rainfall is scarcely 100 mm (3.9 in) per year in the northern part of the Dead Sea and barely 50 mm (2.0 in) in the southern part. The Dead Sea zone's aridity is due to the rainshadow effect of the Judean Hills. The highlands east of the Dead Sea receive more rainfall than the Dead Sea itself. To the west of the Dead Sea, the Judean Hills rise less steeply and are much lower than the mountains to the east. Along the southwestern side of the lake is a 210 m (690 ft) tall halite formation called "Mount Sodom".There are two contending hypotheses about the origin of the low elevation of the Dead Sea. The older hypothesis is that it lies in a true rift zone, an extension of the Red Sea Rift, or even of the Great Rift Valley of eastern Africa. A more recent hypothesis is that the Dead Sea basin is a consequence of a "step-over" discontinuity along the Dead Sea Transform, creating extension of the crust with consequent subsidence. Around three million years ago, what is now the valley of the Jordan River, Dead Sea, and Wadi Arabah was repeatedly inundated by waters from the Mediterranean Sea. The waters formed in a narrow, crooked bay which was connected to the sea through what is now the Jezreel Valley. The floods of the valley came and went depending on long scale climate change. The lake that occupied the Dead Sea Rift, named "Lake Sodom", deposited beds of salt, eventually coming to be 3 km (1.9 mi) thick. Approximately two million years ago, the land between the Rift Valley and the Mediterranean Sea rose to such an extent that the ocean could no longer flood the area. Thus, the long bay became a lake.Masada (Hebrew מצדה, pronounced Metzada (help•info), from מצודה, metzuda, "fortress") is the name for a site of ancient palaces and fortifications in the South District of Israel on top of an isolated rock plateau, or horst, on the eastern edge of the Judean Desert overlooking the Dead Sea. After the First Jewish-Roman War a siege of the fortress by troops of the Roman Empire led to the mass suicide of the Sicarii rebels, who preferred death to surrender. It is located about 20 km east of Arad
🌊 Ocean summit held as three-quarters of world's reefs under threat | Al Jazeera English
 
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Political, business and environmental leaders from around the globe are gathering in Mexico for the World Ocean Summit. The aim is to come up with ways to use maritime resources sustainably. But the location of the meeting itself is a cautionary tale of financial gains trumping environmental concerns. Al Jazeera's Jonah Hull reports from Cancun, Mexico. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 2974 Al Jazeera English
Look how easy it is to swim at the Dead Sea
 
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Jukin Media Verified (Original) * For licensing / permission to use: Contact - licensing(at)jukinmediadotcom
Views: 5775298 Samara Benezra
Close Call: Flipping Iceberg Nearly Crushes Explorers | Expedition Raw
 
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Franz Josef Land is one of the last lingering remnants of the wild Arctic. The remote and nearly uninhabited archipelago is renowned for its biodiversity. The impact of climate change, however, nearly turned this serene environment deadly for National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe ➡ Watch all clips of Expedition Raw here: http://bit.ly/WatchmoreExpeditionRaw ➡ Get More Expedition Raw on Youtube: http://bit.ly/NGExpeditionRaw About Expedition Raw: Surprises, challenges, and amazing behind-the-scenes moments captured by National Geographic explorers in the field. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Franz Josef Land is one of the last lingering remnants of the wild Arctic. The remote and nearly uninhabited archipelago is renowned for its biodiversity. The impact of climate change, however, nearly turned this serene environment deadly for National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala . By removing human threats such as exploitation, fishing, mining, drilling, coastal development, and direct pollution, we can protect vast spaces of the ocean, which would lead to a healthier planet overall. “There is no more discussion about whether climate change exists. Now we're talking about the solutions. We need to make sure that people understand the urgency of the issue,” urges Sala. By working together, we can change the course. Enric Sala is a National Geographic explorer-in-residence. He explores the wildest places in the ocean and tries to inspire countries’ leaders to protect them through the initiative he launched, Pristine Seas. http://bit.ly/Prisitineseas Be sure to watch Before the Flood on the National Geographic Channel, starting October 30. http://bit.ly/NGBeforeTheFlood SERIES PRODUCER: Chris Mattle VIDEO PRODUCER/EDITOR: Monica Pinzon ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Elaina Kimes FOOTAGE: Pristine Seas Close Call: Flipping Iceberg Nearly Crushes Explorers | Expedition Raw https://youtu.be/xPR5FoF6evY National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 178100 National Geographic
World Water Day - Restoring the Danube River and Black Sea
 
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The most international river basin in the world, the Danube River basin, includes territories of 19 countries. Over the past 150 years, agricultural, industrial and municipal pollution severely damaged the ecosystems in the basin and the quality and quantity of water. The impact on the environment was so massive that a 'dead zone' caused by oxygen depletion formed in the western part of the Black Sea. An international plan, with support of UNDP, helped to restore the river basin and revive the Black Sea ecosystem upon which millions depend for their livelihoods. UNDP identified the major sources of pollution, developed an investment strategy and strengthened institutions that govern the Danube River basin. The UNDP-GEF 49,5 million USD programme helped to catalyze 3,5 billion USD investments into reforms of governing institutions and systems, and into new agricultural and industrial practices. As a result, an effective trans-boundary waters management programme was implemented during the 1990's. The strategic plan and incoming funding enabled the countries along the Danube to monitor and improve water quality and quantity by establishing 75 water quality monitoring stations throughout the basin. With the support of the programme, the governments instituted a damage control system to minimize accidental chemical spills and agreed to reduce nutrient pollution. Through these reforms and investments, industrial, municipal and agricultural pollution was reduced, virtually eliminating the dead zone in the Black Sea and leading to a significant eco-system recovery. UNDP works with over 100 countries to modify agriculture, industry, mining, fishing and wastewater management to lessen ecological damage to the water systems. In this way, conflicts can be prevented, security and livelihoods improved, habitats protected and health risks minimized.
The real realization of human negative impact on the natural environment
 
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Massive exploitation of surface coal mines under the coordination of these poorly managed regional government permits has damaged the nature environment in the Kalimantan, 2000s. The pictures from some of which are in East Kalimantan not including South Kalimantan and surrounding area, which pictures taken by a sr. offshore structure engineer who is one of the environmentalists on the helicopter when he often went to the sea offshore when it was still active in the work there. This is to remind all that the attention to the environment, how to preserve the environment, do not destroy and abandoned but should be improved for environmental sustainability. As a means, damaged environment that should be done reforestation that can be comfortable to make interesting objects and tours as well. Of course this helps to reduce global warming , not add it if realized environmental preservation.
Views: 69 MHA Channel
11 Things Found After Japanese Tsunami
 
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Some of the craziest things will wash up after a big storm like an entire yacht on top of a building and soccer ball across the country! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 6. A Japanese Dock This piece of debris happened to be part of a Japanese dock that was torn from its moorings during the tsunami and washed up on the shores of Oregon and brought back what researchers believe to be about 100 tons of sea life. Scientists from the Oregon State University state that the 66-foot-long deck has around 13 pounds of organisms per square foot. The dock did not show any signs of radiation from the Fukushima nuclear plant meltdown caused by the tsunami, but it did pose the threat of carrying invasive species. What that means is that these creatures that aren’t natives to the area could potentially throw the local ecosystems out of whack and cause irreparable damage to the native wildlife, such as the dread zebra mussel. 5. A Mystery Creature There have been some unusual things that have washed up on random shores after tsunamis, this being one of them. After the 2011 tsunami hit, this giant white mass had been washed out onto the shore of Japan and had many of the locals, along with everyone who watched this video on YouTube, wondering what it even was? Some thought it to be a brand new creature that had risen from the dark depths of the ocean floor while others speculated it was merely a large rock or boulder. Don’t worry, officials have concluded that this isn’t some new species that’s going to wipe us out. They simply stated that it’s most likely just a mass of whale blubber from the carcass of a dead whale that’s pretty much unrecognizable. 4. A Shipping Tote Back in November of 2014, this shipping tote had washed up near the shores of Seal Rock in Oregon. This 4-by-5 foot plastic shipping tote had been floating out at sea for the last 3 years since the tsunami struck and amassed around 200 blue mussels that were attached to it. Like the dock that was found in 2012, this tote was a potential host for carrying invasive species and scientist eventually determined it as a non-threat to the surrounding environment. Still, the amount of debris, the total estimated to be around 18.11 million tons with 70 percent of the debris sinking to the bottom of the ocean, is still rather high and is still washing up years after that tragic event took place. 3. Various Trash A barge from the fishing town of Ucluelet in British Columbia had carried in around “super sacks” of debris caused by the tsunami. Those sacks are designed to hold up to 1,000 pounds, so you can only imagine how heavy all that weight could possibly be. Ever since the tsunami struck, there have been volunteer pickups in the town where local and Japanese students have gotten involved. They’ve managed to collect all different sorts of garbage such as styrofoam, pieces of Japanese houses, and other debris. Though they’ve made progress, their results haven’t been achieved through smooth sailing. The coastline of Ucluelet is described as remote and rugged which made the cleanups very difficult and the fact that there was already debris unrelated to the tsunami already there makes for even more trash than expected. 2. An Entire Ship This yacht happened to be discovered in the Iwate Prefecture in Northeastern Japan in the town of Otsuchi nearly two months after the tsunami had hit. The ship weighs in at an incredible 200 tons and it’s a huge surprise that the two-story building that is supporting all that weight is still somehow managing to keep from collapsing. It’s hard to even process the amount of force needed to lift the ship. 1. A House As one of the most powerful and deadly disasters that can occur in nature, the tsunami is one that leaves devastation in its wake. Their sheer force can only be imagined by those who have never witnessed what it can be capable of at first hand and even then you can never come close to doing it justice. Take for example this house that was a part of the Fukushima debris. This was someone’s entire home where they built a life for themselves around it and in a matter of moments, it was swept off its foundation and carried out into the sea, along with what is estimated to be another 200,000 buildings.
Views: 16208314 Talltanic
Reefs At Risk - is your sunscreen killing the reef?
 
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Set on the beautiful beaches of Hawaii, "Reefs at Risk" explores the harmful effects some sunscreen chemicals have on coral reefs and marine life. In order to protect this fragile ecosystem, Hawaii strives to ban a commonly used UV chemical, called oxybenzone, and hopes that other states and nations will follow. *UPDATE: HAWAII BANNED OXYBENZONE AND OCTINOXATE IN THE 2018 SESSION. WATCH A 5-MINUTE UPDATED VERSION OF REEFS AT RISK HERE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGP9loQ0dqs Visit www.ReefsAtRisk.org to download our reef safe sunscreen guide! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram @thecoverupfilm to learn more about toxic chemicals in body care products and to help support our feature film which is currently in production. #ReefsAtRisk If you want to help create subtitles in other languages for this film go to http://amara.org/en/videos/SMypVlgy5RGl/info/reefs-at-risk-whats-in-your-sunscreen/. Thank you!
Views: 20865 THE COVERUP FILM
What Happens If All The Coral Dies?
 
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Coral reefs are lively ecosystems populating our ocean, but what happens if they all die? What are the consequences? Watch More: What's Hiding Deep Within The Ocean? ►►►► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2Zv3OOhQEQ Support Life Noggin on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/LifeNogginStudios?ty=h Follow Us! https://twitter.com/LifeNoggin https://facebook.com/LifeNoggin Click here to see more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/lifenoggin Life Noggin is a weekly animated educational series. Whether it's science, pop culture, history or art, we explore it all and have a ton of fun doing it. Life Noggin Team: Animation by Steven Lawson Director/Voice: http://lifenogg.in/patgraziosi Executive Producer: http://lifenogg.in/IanDokie Director of Marketing: http://lifenogg.in/JaredOban Head Writer: http://lifenogg.in/KayleeYuhas Sources: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/kits/corals/coral07_importance.html https://www.reefrelief.org/the-importance-of-coral-reefs/ http://www.nature.com/scitable/blog/saltwater-science/why_are_coral_reefs_important http://ocean.si.edu/corals-and-coral-reefs http://rainforests.mongabay.com/09reefs.htm http://www.wri.org/publication/reefs-risk-revisited http://www.wri.org/sites/default/files/reefs_at_risk_key_findings.pdf http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/25/coral-reefs-may-be-gone-b_n_827709.html http://www.algone.com/zooxanthellae-and-corals http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/coral_bleach.html Written by Michael Sago
Views: 792197 Life Noggin
Is Your Sunscreen Hurting Coral Reefs?
 
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Chemicals in our sunscreen contribute to the demise of coral reefs. What can we do? TEACHERS: Get your students in the discussion on KQED Learn, a safe place for middle and high school students to investigate controversial topics and share their voices. https://learn.kqed.org/topics/ The same chemicals in sunscreen that protect our skin from harmful UV rays are also contributing to the demise of coral reefs around the world. If we want to save coral but also protect our skin from the sun, what can we do? ABOVE THE NOISE is a show that cuts through the hype and investigates the research behind controversial and trending topics in the news. Hosted by Myles Bess. *NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER WEDNESDAY* SUBSCRIBE by clicking the RED BUTTON above. Follow us on Instagram @kqedabovethenoise Coral reefs are not only beautiful, they are an important part of our oceans’ ecosystems and support a diverse group of marine life. Some estimates suggest that 90% of the world’s coral is under threat of dying by 2050. Certain chemicals in sunscreen aren’t the only reason coral reefs are dying. The situation is actually quite complicated. Climate change, overfishing, and ocean acidification are also all playing a role. However, the chemicals in sunscreen are considered harmful enough to these ecosystems that Hawaii is trying to ban the use of sunscreens with these reef-killing components in them. Now, they aren’t alone. The Center for Biological diversity has petitioned the federal government to ban the same chemicals across the country. So now the question remains, how can we protect our skin and coral reefs? How does sunscreen harm coral? A major study found that the chemicals oxybenzone and octinoxate, which is present in many the common sunscreens we use, is changing the DNA of coral cells so that mature coral becomes sterile and unable to reproduce while younger ones trap themselves in their own skeletons, where they starve and and die. What about coral bleaching? Oxybenzone also exacerbate the problem of coral bleaching because it causes the coral to absorb more heat. Coral bleaching occurs when water temperatures rise to around 87 or 88 degrees Fahrenheit, causing coral to expel the algae called zooxanthellae, which is what gives coral their vibrant colors. Are all sunscreens bad? No, there are quite a few options that are totally safe for you and the environment. For example, sunscreens with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are good options. And, of course, there’s always the option to stay covered up with clothes or in the shade. FOR EDUCATORS Want to bring Above the Noise into the classroom? Check out our lesson plan other support materials: https://wp.me/p681tQ-7mU SOURCES: Slathering on sunscreen at the beach? It may be destroying coral reefs https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/apr/28/sunscreen-damage-coral-research-oxybenzone CDC: Americans Carry Body Burden of Toxic Sunscreen Chemical https://www.ewg.org/news/testimony-official-correspondence/cdc-americans-carry-body-burden-toxic-sunscreen-chemical#.WyKwwxJKhBw Here Are Some Alternatives to Reef-Damaging Sunscreen https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/features/sunscreen-destroying-coral-reefs-alternatives-travel-spd/ Push to Ban Coral-Killing Sunscreens Goes National https://www.kqed.org/science/1924274/push-to-ban-coral-killing-sunscreens-goes-national Sunscreen can tip the balance toward invasive species in Maui’s coral reefs http://www.mauinews.com/news/community-news/2016/10/sunscreen-can-tip-the-balance-toward-invasive-species-in-mauis-coral-reefs/ FOR EDUCATORS KQED Learn https://learn.kqed.org KQED Teach https://teach.kqed.org KQED Education https://ww2.kqed.org/education https://www.facebook.com/KQEDEducation https://twitter.com/KQEDedspace https://www.instagram.com/kqededucation About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio, and web media. Funding for Above the Noise is provided in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Silver Giving Foundation, Stuart Foundation, and William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.
Views: 7432 Above The Noise
Israel suffers water crisis after five years of drought
 
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(24 Jul 2018) LEADIN Israel is experiencing a water crisis after suffering five years of drought. It's an issue affecting farmers and tourism - but the government's solution to increase desalination has not been welcomed by everyone. STORYLINE Israel's 5-year drought is posing a new dilemma for Israeli farmer Ofer Moskovitz. Usually he can grow more than one crop each year, but due to the increasing cost of water for farmers, Moskovitz has chosen to only take care of his avocado orchard this summer. Moskovitz says the region he lives in, in Israel's Upper Galilee, has seen less rainfall over the past several years, from 700 millimetres per year, down to around 300 or 400. According to the Water Authority, Israel's official agency for managing the water sector, Israel is in a water crisis after experiencing five consecutive years of drought. "My dilemma is between vegetables and wheat and what grows in the winter, and the orchards. I need to put a certain amount of water into the avocados. If I don't have it, I don't go and plant wheat, because I would miss water for the avocados," he says. "The avocado tree grows for 20 or 30 years, if I don't water it for one day it gets weak. If I don't water it for a year, 20 years would go down the drain." Israel's northern regions have seen changes in both agriculture and nature as a result of the drought. According to officials at the historic Tel Dan nature reserve, the springs will be dry within two months, which could have an impact on tourism in the region. "The flow now, these months at the beginning of summer, is about 50 per cent of the average, the annual average. And the low quantity has really influenced the nature, the whole habitat, the aquatic habitat in the streams," says Hillel Glassman who supervises streams managed by Israel's Nature and Parks Authority. The biblical bodies of waters — pilgrimage sites for baptisms and beach parties alike — are crucial to the survival and stability of Israel, Jordan and the Palestinians. But more and more of the river the ancient Israelites crossed to enter the Holy Land is drying up — the result of climate change, growing populations and the increasing use of its water for agriculture. Israel's government plans to double its desalination capacity over the next 10 to 12 years, and will use this water for household use, farming, and to support natural areas like Tel Dan and the Sea of Galilee. New desalination facilities are planned to be built in the western Galilee and in Soreq in central Israel. But according to Glassman, desalinated water does not work well as a supplement for natural bodies of water. He says he does not want the desalinated water in nature because it is "very low in minerals". Maya Jacobs, CEO of Zalul, an environmental advocacy organisation, agrees that desalination is an important aspect of solving Israel's drought, but believes that it cannot be the only solution. "Putting all our eggs, so to speak, in the same basket, is not a wise thing to do for anybody, especially not for a country," Jacobs said. The Jordan River rises as the confluence of several tributaries at the northern end of the Great Rift, a 3,700-mile (6,000-kilometre) tear in the Earth's crust. It flows south into the Sea of Galilee, also known as Lake Kinneret, then meanders 220 miles (360 kilometres) to the lowest place on the planet, the Dead Sea. "The state of Israel would put the costs on the farmers. We don't have enough, we fight for a single shekel," Moskovitz says. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2866d6956534cc0cdec79100aa713fcc
Views: 3914 AP Archive
Visit the Dead Sea from Jerusalem
 
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Float in the Dead Sea when you visit Jerusalem. http://bit.ly/2vJbSvZ Located on the border of Jordan and Israel, the Dead Sea is known worldwide for its extremely high salt content, which makes it incredibly easy to float and relax. Plus, the mud on the shores is full of revitalizing minerals, and many visitors lather it on their bodies from head to toe. If you’re not staying overnight, try a day trip from Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Amman, or other local cities. It’s a can’t-miss if you’re in the area! Watch our videos for travel inspiration. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-Viator Find and Book Over 50,000 Things to Do on Viator, a TripAdvisor Company! Our team of travel insiders is obsessed with finding the best things to do everywhere we travel. Book your travel activities today at https://www.viator.com/book Connect with us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ViatorTours Twitter: https://twitter.com/ViatorTravel Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/viatortravel/ Check out the playlists below of things to do around the world: Paris - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6B9eRftggo&list=PLCFBAACF6B88F832F Italy - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQsWZ9d8StU&index=1&list=PLAE598921784DB89E Las Vegas - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWdyHpAep4o&list=PLC2911B29B02CEFE0 New York City - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62LH_lRbauI&list=PL158305B7A7DDD19F London - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMBVUWQxW2w&list=PLEFA78CD9B64B3CB9 Amsterdam - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PXsiHR1ccE&list=PLFB8836E624055520 Barcelona - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ywlJaZhA7Y&list=PLE44D5E9AB38DFDFC San Francisco - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQT-kGSymmk&list=PL278FC212797BF831 Tokyo - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55_ooo216ko&list=PLXq_DuePH3PleD_dx1L3UtiUElPDCxb8y Australia - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7BmYZyBdiM&list=PL967A75D81B7C2616&index=1 Dubai - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74uactVi-VY&index=1&list=PLXq_DuePH3PkyqzpC1UNUcvydlP4aDIKS Iceland - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEWKKRzx0c0&index=1&t=1s&list=PLXq_DuePH3Pk5OnYe8BJKnaGgA3bzgSfj Hawaii - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKrym5zuOag&list=PL515E6387154E9E2B&index=1 Cancun - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAtkf8ETfYE&list=PLXq_DuePH3PlbkefBTjeMlpIsXVPlXlnh&index=1&t=16s Seattle - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfAkCTlC2F0&index=1&list=PLXq_DuePH3Pk0NfbyY3D9AsOUyCqqrx8r Plus video playlists for 50+ top Viator destinations! https://www.youtube.com/user/ViatorTravel/playlists?view=1&sort=dd #Jerusalem #DeadSea #Thingstodo #ViatorTravel
Views: 10228 Viator.com
Mekong, the river of nine dragons (full documentary)
 
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The Mekong is one of the great rivers of the world. Born at 5000 meters altitude in the Tibetan Plateau and after crossing China, Burma, Thailand, enters in Laos and Cambodia to die in the China Sea, South of Vietnam. Laos, Cambodia and southern Vietnam are the site where develops this episode, which aims to show the reality of these three countries and how the Mekong River is central to the life of its people. Anam mountains, in Laos, welcoming Ekor Tribe. Until then the cameras have moved the program to capture the new year celebration, its leisurely way of life and respect for the environment in their daily work. Following the path of spirituality that the river leaves behind in this place, are the temples pagodas and monasteries where youth are initiated into the monkhood and show the subtle balance between the religious world and the secular world. In Cambodia you still can guess the splendor of the ancient Khmer empire in the refined ruins of a civilization that was able to create a complex system of canals and levees for intensive rice cultivation. But the country is marked by a recent past of violence. The documentary features testimonies about the concentration camps that killed off a third of the population, and analyzes the problem of a land planted of bombs and mines that produce a staggering 10 amputations a day. The delta of the nine dragons is the Vietnamese name given to the river where it flows into the South China Sea. Here 5000 channels carry water to the rice fields. In Sang, the largest city in the delta, where the river dies, the Li family, wealthy fish merchants, offers insight into the hectic life of this population sustained by the Mekong River. Versión en ESPAÑOL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ML9QBqTDx8o&list=SP_w57E3bEZdeLAlRXAVVolqySZeoOLZC-&index=49
Marine resources   tourism documentary
 
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A group of marine science students interviewed 2 local water sports companies, on the impacts of leisure tourism on the marine environment. Very special thank you to Chloe at WeSUP and Rob at Elemental UK for answering our questions.
Views: 51 Joel Fullwood
Oceans 101 | National Geographic
 
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Oceans serve as the planet’s largest habitat and also help to regulate the global climate. But why is the ocean salty? And how is climate change impacting the ocean? Find out more about the ocean, including the consequences of and potential solutions to these changes. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe Select footage courtesy NASA: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=11056 About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Oceans 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/MfWyzrkFkg8 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 127376 National Geographic
Professor Tore Furevik - Climate Change: The view from Norway - Nordic Horizons
 
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Apologies - alternate audio from: 9:54 - 15:45 & 1:16:46 - 1:21:09 Professor Tore Furevik - University of Bergen Tuesday October 4th, 6.00pm, Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh Sponsored by Claudia Beamish MSP Norway is one of the most environmentally friendly countries in the world. Much of its energy comes from renewable sources, with hydro energy powering many towns and industries. Meanwhile Scotland prides itself on having the most ambitious climate change targets. But are either of these oil-producing North Sea neighbours facing up to the real speed of climate change? Temperatures in the high north are increasing faster than the world average. Permafrost and sea ice are disappearing. Fish stocks are changing. Melting of glaciers and the Greenland ice cap is raising sea levels. Across the world, the impacts of climate change on water and food security, and human health, will be dramatic. But beside these threats, sit commercial opportunities. Less sea ice makes commercial activities more attractive in the high north. This increases stress on an already vulnerable Arctic ecosystem. Is exploitation of oil and gas in harmony with 'green growth' and in line with the Paris agreement? Will deep sea mining become a safe industrial adventure or an environmental catastrophe? Who will benefit from changes in fish stocks? When will the northern transport routes become commercially attractive? Should tourism be limited? Tore Furevik is Professor in physical oceanography at the University of Bergen’s Geophysical Institute. SUPPORTED BY THE SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT
Views: 855 Democracy TV
Deep In A Iron Mine (Part 1)
 
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PLEASE SHARE MY VIDEOS IF YOU LIKE THEM To see part 2, heres the link: https://youtu.be/wsHPi1lsvEI Today the family and I goto Iron Mountain Mi and go deep inside an old iron mine, it was an extremely interesting tour but don't think the fun ends there, the next part is even more entertaining.
Views: 167 WildinWiwithWes
Chinese research vessel sets sail on new voyage
 
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Chinese research vessel Zhang Jian set sail from South China's Shenzhen Chiwan Wharf Saturday, after completing its deep sea exploration in South China Sea. Its destination is the waters of the New Britain Trench, which is more than 8,000 meters deep in the Solomon Sea off Papua New Guinea. Upon its arrival, the research team on board will work jointly with two mining companies in Papua New Guinea to conduct a joint scientific research. Staff from the two countries will utilize the research equipment on the vessel to study the impact of mining activities on deep sea environment. The vessel Zhang Jian will also cooperate with local tourism agencies to offer deep-sea exploration opportunities to diving fans. The vessel will test its navigation abilities and equipment during its two-month voyage to the Southern Pacific. The ship is 97 meters long and 17.8 meters wide. It has a designed displacement of around 4,800 tonnes and an endurance of 15,000 nautical miles. The ship is the first of its kind in China that is designed and built for deep-sea exploration.
Views: 264 New China TV
Space Exploration is the Worst | Emily Calandrelli | TEDxIndianaUniversity
 
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Opening for TEDxIndianaUniversity was Xploration Outer Space producer and star, Emily Calandrelli’s tongue in cheek summary of why space exploration is actually a misguided and empty pursuit, upon which billions of dollars are wasted every year. Emily Calandrelli is a producer and the host of FOX's Xploration Outer Space, a nationally syndicated educational program about the space industry. She is also a writer for TechCrunch where she covers technology topics with a focus on commercial space companies. Emily graduated from MIT with a Masters in Aeronautics and Astronautics and second Masters in Technology and Policy. While at MIT, Emily was awarded the Rene H. Miller Award for the best piece of Systems Engineering work in the AeroAstro department. She received her bachelors in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from West Virginia University. As an undergraduate, Emily received the Truman Scholarship, Goldwater Scholarship, and placed on USA Today's All-USA Academic First Team. Emily enjoys writing, speaking, and posting on her social media (@TheSpaceGal) on the topics of science literacy, space exploration, and equality in STEM fields. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 565373 TEDx Talks
STRANGEST Things Happening In The Ocean!
 
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Check out the strangest things happening in the ocean! This top 10 list of strange and unexplained underwater mysteries has some of the most surprising facts about the deep sea! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "STRANGEST Things Found In The Ocean!" video here: https://youtu.be/XYfqi5VNgac Watch our "STRANGEST Things Found In The Philippines!" video here: https://youtu.be/vwIIeiOhTJ0 Watch our "Most STRANGE Things Found On The Beach!" video here: https://youtu.be/cQjpze_4z5U 10. Undersea Rivers It’s easy to look at the ocean and see it as a large mass of water, without many of the features that we see on dry land. But the ocean is full of surprises!! Researchers discovered in the 1980s that things weren’t quite as simple as that, when technology allowed them to map the ocean’s floor for the first time. 9. Crop Circles Crop circles can be creepy. Whether you believe crop circles in farmers’ fields are a result of alien activity or just some artistic people, similar crop circles were found under the water. Researchers were scratching their heads as to how they were being formed. They were first discovered in 1995 off the coast of Japan, and soon a large number of them had been found in the surrounding waters. 8. Hydrothermal Vents In 1977, a team of researchers set off to investigate a temperature anomaly that had been discovered to the northeast of the Galapagos Islands, and what they found changed our understanding of the underwater environment. 7. Red Tide A red tide can occur in virtually every coastal region in the world. In fact, it has been reported in every US state with a shoreline, and incidences are thought to be on the rise. 6. The Julia Sound There’s a lot we don’t understand about the underwater world, especially certain noises that can be difficult to explain. One such noise is known as the ‘Julia’ sound, and was recorded on March 1st 1999. This low whining was so loud that it could be heard across the entire equatorial Pacific ocean autonomous hydrophone array. 5. Black Holes When you think of a black hole, you probably think of outer space, but now, scientists have discovered that black holes are closer than you think. Black holes can suck up matter from anything around them and nothing can escape, not even sound or light. 4. Fairy Circles When tourists and researchers started noticing strange bald patches in the seagrass meadows of the Mediterranean and Baltic seas, they were stumped as to what might be causing them. They were perfect rings with no vegetation. Affectionately known as ‘fairy circles’, they are clearly observable from overhead images of the deep blue ocean and, in some cases, from shore. 3. Internal Waves We’ve all seen images of giant waves on the ocean’s surface, but did you know that the largest waves of all are hidden out of view, deep below what we can see? Known as internal waves, the biggest are found in the Luzon Strait of the South China sea, and can reach up to 550 feet (167 m) tall. Located between Taiwan and the Philippines, these internal waves sound pretty strange! 2. Bioluminescence One of the most beautiful things you’ll ever see in the sea is bioluminescence. It can be caused by a wide variety of creatures such as bacteria, plankton, worms, snails, fish, jellyfish, and even sharks! 1. The Icy Finger of Death The Icy Finger of Death is undoubtedly the strangest thing that happens in the ocean, and potentially one of the most deadly. It’s a phenomenon that’s only recently been discovered happening beneath icebergs, and has fatal consequences for any slow-moving animal caught in its path. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!
Views: 176450 Origins Explained
Mike McDowell to Discuss the Environmental Impact of the 520 Bridge Expansion - 2/21/13
 
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Mike McDowell to Discuss the Environmental Impact of the 520 Bridge Expansion at Western Washington University on Feb. 21, 2013 Contact: Western Washington University's Huxley College of the Environment at (360) 650-3520. http://www.wwu.edu/huxley/ BELLINGHAM -- Mike McDowell will present "520 Bridge Expansion: Environmental Impacts and Assessments" as part of Western Washington University's Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 21 in AW 204 on Western's campus. The presentation is free and open to the public. McDowell will discuss the strategy and challenges of permitting, environmental mitigation, and Endangered Species Act compliance for the SR 520 Bridge Replacement Project. This is the largest single infrastructure project under way in Washington state, with a total estimated budget of $4.6 billion. The project corridor, which stretches from the I-5 in Seattle from the west to the City of Redmond at the east end, includes replacing the longest floating bridge in the world. The project also includes the permitting, mitigation, construction and operations of a pontoon casting basin in Aberdeen and Grays Harbor. To meet the timeline established by the governor, the bridge must be replaced by 2014 because of safety concerns with the existing structure. McDowell will describe the project's environmental impact assessment under state and federal law, as well as discussing the review and permitting of design and build components. McDowell, the principal fisheries and aquatic scientist with Confluence Environmental, has over 30 years of project experience managing and performing baseline biological and fisheries studies, environmental impact statements, and monitoring programs for a wide variety of industries throughout the United States and around the world. His responsibilities have included conducting and managing environmental impact statements under state and federal law. His experience focuses on impacts on fish and aquatic ecosystems from a wide range of development activities. He has also conducted and managed many studies involving salmonid biology, habitat requirements, and life history throughout the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. He has worked in tropical and sub-tropical ecosystems in both the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. He has also worked as the lead aquatic scientist for two mining projects in Ghana, West Africa. McDowell received his bachelor's degree from Western's Huxley College of the Environment in 1978. Anyone interested in these topics is encouraged to come and participate; the presentation will include a question-and-answer period. The speaker series is held by Western's Huxley College of the Environment to bring together the environmentally minded community and other interested members of Western and Bellingham's communities. Speakers address topics of contemporary environmental concern in the region and the world. For more information, please contact the main office of Huxley College of the Environment, at (360) 650-3520. Western's Huxley College of the Environment is one of the oldest environmental colleges in the nation and a recognized national leader in producing the next generation of environmental stewards. The College's academic programs reflect a broad view of the physical, biological, social and cultural world. This innovative and interdisciplinary approach makes Huxley unique. The College has earned international recognition for the quality of its programs.
We need to change how we bury the dead
 
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The way we traditionally bury the dead is horrible for the environment. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o The modern way of burying a body, the "casket in the ground method" most of us are used to is horrible for the environment. It uses an incredible amount of resources, emits toxic pollutants into the air, and pumps the ground full of formaldehyde, which is known to cause cancer. It's also prohibitively expensive. The average cost of a modern funeral costs between $10,000 to $12,000. There are a number of greener options available though. Cremation uses less resources and requires less space than a traditional burial, but isn't perfect. There are more experimental methods on the horizon such as promession and alkaline hydrolysis. No matter which method we choose, it's clear that we need to reform how we bury the dead. Also be sure to read Mark Harris's excellent book about green burials http://www.gravematters.us
Views: 4869699 Vox
Defending Marine Wildlife | Explorer
 
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In their mission to stop fishing of the endangered totoaba fish, the Sea Shepherd crew finds other animals caught up in fishing nets. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe ➡ Watch all clips of Explorer here: http://bit.ly/WatchExplorer ➡ Get More Explorer: http://bit.ly/MoreExplorer About Explorer: Explorer, the longest-running documentary series in cable television history, honored with nearly 60 Emmys and hundreds of other awards, continues as a series of major specials on the National Geographic Channel. In the course of more than two thousand films, Explorer has taken viewers to more than 120 countries, opening a window on hidden parts of the world, unlocking mysteries both ancient and modern, and investigating stories of science, nature, and culture. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Defending Marine Wildlife | Explorer https://youtu.be/V-wFu_MeYjE National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 34319 National Geographic
Red Sea to Supply Water to Dead Sea
 
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The Dead Sea, bordering the Middle Eastern countries of Israel and Jordan, and the Palestine territories, is reportedly losing water, with the surface receding at the rate of around three feet annually, due to irrigation water taken out of its tributary, the River Jordan. The Dead Sea, bordering the Middle Eastern countries of Israel and Jordan, and the Palestine territories, is reportedly losing water, with the surface receding at the rate of around three feet annually, due to irrigation water taken out of its tributary, the River Jordan. An agreement has been signed by officials from Israel, Jordan and the Palestinian Authority in an effort to save the Dead Sea from disappearing by bringing water from the Red Sea to a desalination plant in Jordan and piping the resulting brine to the Dead Sea. Hydroelectric energy will be used to power the desalination process that will also provide drinking water for the area. The deal was signed at the World Bank headquarters in Washington D.C. with a projected cost of between 250 and 400 million dollars. The Dead Sea not only provides water for the area, but is also popular with the health and tourism industry thanks to its unique mineral properties. These industries are threatened by the loss of water, which some estimates say could disappear by 2050. However, environmental advocacy groups are also concerned over the possible effects of the brine on the area's fragile ecosystem. What do you think about the plan to bring brine from the Red Sea to restore the Dead Sea' s water level?
Views: 11469 GeoBeats News
Dead Sea | मान्छे नडुब्ने सागर  मृत सागर  | dead sea of israel |  2019 Viral Video
 
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Dead Sea | मान्छे नडुब्ने सागर मृत सागर | dead sea of israel | 2019 Viral Video The Dead Sea (Hebrew: יָם הַמֶּלַח About this soundYam ha-Melah lit. Sea of Salt; Arabic: البحر الميت‎ About this soundAl-Bahr al-Mayyit[5]) is a salt lake bordered by Jordan to the east and Israel and the West Bank to the west. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. Its surface and shores are 430.5 metres (1,412 ft) below sea level,[4][6] Earth's lowest elevation on land. It is 304 m (997 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With a salinity of 342 g/kg, or 34.2% (in 2011), it is one of the world's saltiest bodies of water[7] – 9.6 times as salty as the ocean – and has a density of 1.24 kg/litre, which makes swimming similar to floating.[8][9] This salinity makes for a harsh environment in which plants and animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea's main, northern basin is 50 kilometres (31 mi) long and 15 kilometres (9 mi) wide at its widest point.[1] The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean Basin for thousands of years. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from asphalt for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilisers. People also use the salt and the minerals from the Dead Sea to create cosmetics and herbal sachets. The Dead Sea is receding at an alarming rate; its surface area today is 605 km2 (234 sq mi), having been 1,050 km2 (410 sq mi) in 1930. The recession of the Dead Sea has begun causing problems, and multiple canals and pipelines proposals exist to reduce its recession. One of these proposals is the Red Sea–Dead Sea Water Conveyance project, carried out by Jordan, which will provide water to neighbouring countries, while the brine will be carried to the Dead Sea to help stabilise its water level. The first phase of the project is scheduled to begin in 2018 and be completed in 2021.[10] Contents 1 Etymology and toponymy 2 Geography 3 Natural history 4 Climate 5 Chemistry 6 Putative therapies 6.1 Psoriasis 6.2 Rhinosinusitis 6.3 Osteoarthritis 7 Fauna and flora 8 Human settlement 9 Human history 9.1 Biblical period 9.2 Greek and Roman period 9.3 Byzantine period 9.4 Modern times 10 Tourism and leisure 10.1 British Mandate period 10.2 Israel 10.3 Jordan 10.4 West Bank 11 Chemical industry 11.1 British Mandate period 11.2 Israel 11.3 Jordan 11.4 West Bank 11.5 Extraction 12 Recession and environmental concerns 13 See also 14 References 15 Further reading 16 External links Etymology and toponymy In Hebrew, the Dead Sea is About this soundYām ha-Melaḥ (help·info) (ים המלח), meaning "sea of salt" (Genesis 14:3). The Bible uses this term alongside two others: the Sea of the Arabah (Yām ha-‘Ărāvâ ים הערבה), and the Eastern Sea (Yām ha-Mizraḥî ים המזרחי). The designation "Dead Sea" never appears in the Bible. In prose sometimes the term Yām ha-Māvet (ים המוות, "sea of death") is used, due to the scarcity of aquatic life there.[11] In Arabic the Dead Sea is called About this soundal-Bahr al-Mayyit (help·info)[5] ("the Dead Sea"), or less commonly baḥrᵘ lūṭᵃ (بحر لوط, "the Sea of Lot"). Another historic name in Arabic was the "Sea of Zoʼar", after a nearby town in biblical times. The Greeks called it Lake Asphaltites (Attic Greek ἡ Θάλαττα ἀσφαλτῖτης, hē Thálatta asphaltĩtēs, "the Asphaltite[12] sea"). Geography Satellite photograph showing the location of the Dead Sea east of the Mediterranean Sea The Dead Sea is an endorheic lake located in the Jordan Rift Valley, a geographic feature formed by the Dead Sea Transform (DST). This left lateral-moving transform fault lies along the tectonic plate boundary between the African Plate and the Arabian Plate. It runs between the East Anatolian Fault zone in Turkey and the northern end of the Red Sea Rift offshore of the southern tip of Sinai. It is here that the Upper Jordan River/Sea of Galilee/Lower Jordan River water system comes to an end. The Jordan River is the only major water source flowing into the Dead Sea, although there are small perennial springs under and around the Dead Sea, forming pools and quicksand pits along the edges.[13] There are no outlet streams. The Mujib River, biblical Arnon, is one of the larger water sources of the Dead Sea other than the Jordan.[14] The Wadi Mujib valley, 420 m below the sea level in the southern part of the Jordan valley, is a biosphere reserve, with an area of 212 km2 (82 sq mi).[15] Other more substantial sources are Wadi Darajeh (Arabic)/Nahal Dragot (Hebrew), and Nahal Arugot.[14] Wadi Hasa (biblical Zered) is another wadi flowing into the Dead Sea. Rainfall is scarcely 100 mm (4 in) per year in the northern part of the Dead Sea and barely 50 mm (2 in) in the southern part.
Dead Sea Swim
 
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Swimming in the lowest place on Earth, the Dead Sea, Israel. The water is so dense with minerals, you literally float on the water. It was the weirdest and awesome feeling ever! Music Artist: Judah and the Lions Song: Kickin da Leaves Album: Kids These Days
Views: 122 Sail Redemption
Save OTAGO from DEEP SEA OIL DRILLING - ANADARKO OUT!
 
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This video is mirrored from http://www.youtube.com/user/nautilusnoel Thanks for the great info mate. We get one chance at this,.. In October 2012, the United States based Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in partnership with Australian based Origin Energy intend to start deep-sea oil-drilling in the Canterbury Basin (exploration permit PEP 38262), about 60 km off the coast of Dunedin. Anadarko had a 25% share in the project that caused the Deepwater Horizon (BP) oil spill, Gulf of Mexico in 2010, spilling over 600,000 tonnes of oil into the sea. Deep-sea oil-drilling is of major concern in the Otago region (and New Zealand) because of the alarming environmental and economic risks that face our people, land and sea. Global oil giants are not welcome to drill in our coastal waters. There are currently no adequate protection measures in place to protect our environment from a deep sea oil disaster. New Zealand will lose 95% of the profits gained from drilling our seabed, yet we will bear 100% of the cost when something goes wrong. History tells us that it is only a matter of time before we pay the price. Surely it's not worth taking such a risk? What do we risk by allowing these oil companies to drill thousands of kilometers into our seabed? 1) Our wildlife - The Otago marine environment includes many unique and fragile ecosystems, and is home to many species, including seabirds, shorebirds, whales, dolphins, fur seals and sea lions. A deep sea oil disaster will leave our local marine flora and fauna vulnerable to the toxic effects of oil. 2) Our fishing industry - Commercial seafood exports consistently rank as New Zealand's fourth or fifth largest export earner, while recreational fishing is one New Zealand's most popular activities. A deep sea oil disaster will directly impact our local fisheries resulting in both the loss of valuable fish stocks and the loss of industry jobs. 3) Our tourism industry - The pristine coastlines and unique wildlife of Otago attract tens of thousands of international tourists annually, injecting an economic boost into the region. A deep sea oil disaster will have a pivotal role in tourists' decisions to visit the Otago region. 4) Our recreational water sports - Otago offers unparalleled opportunities for ocean sports such as surfing, kayaking, wind surfing, jet skiing, diving and boating. A deep sea oil disaster will invariably impact many local businesses, organisations, and individuals who enjoy Otago's waters. 5) Our assets - We should be protecting our national assets, not selling them off to be exploited by foreign corporations, or endangering them by oil drilling without adequate safety measures. 6) Our climate - The climate change impacts of fossil fuels are disastrous. New Zealand should be investing in clean energy solutions instead of investing in extracting the last drops of oil from the ends of the earth. We should be climate pioneers not fossil fools. 7) Our coastal way of life - This is a fundamental part of being a kiwi, and we must protect it for ourselves, and for generations to come. Visit http://www.oilfreeotago.org and sign the petition to say NO to DEEP SEA OIL DRILLING in OTAGO PETITION: http://www.change.org/petitions/say-no-to-deep-sea-oil-drilling-in-otago http://www.change.org/petitions/prime-minister-john-key-and-the-new-zealand-government-stop-all-plans-to-open-up-nz-s-coastal-waters-to-offshore-oil-drilling Video made by Our Seas, Our Future (http://www.facebook.com/marinereserves)
Views: 783 dumbbell33
Unleashing Hidden Potential of Blue Economy -- By Dr. P. Sekhar
 
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Blue economy is a new paradigm which is a systematic way of utilising water resources with immeasurable economic potential in both marine and inland water based Ecosystem. Two-thirds of the earth’s surface is covered by water. As we know India has naturally been a maritime country blessed with huge water resources ……more than 7,500 km of coastline, ……above 2 million sq. km of Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), …….more than 1,200 Islands …….more than 48 hundred Dams and 195,095 km length of river and canal network. It is estimated that the value of blue economy potential in India almost US$1 trillion for upcoming years. Definition of Blue Economy: The Blue Economy is envisaged as the integration of Ocean Economy development with the principles of social inclusion, environmental sustainability and innovative, dynamic business models. This water-based ecosystem provides economic wealth from Travel & Tourism, Shipping, Oil and Gas Industry, Fisheries, Renewable Energy, Bio – Tech Industry and Deep sea bed mining. While economic growth has produced many benefits – raising standards of living and improving the quality of life across the world – it has also resulted in the depletion or reduction of natural resources and the degradation of ecosystems.
Top 10 Most Beautiful Places In The World
 
07:08
Top 10 Most Beautiful Places In The World. Subscribe http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD More incredible around-the-world content & awesome travel pics on Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/travel The most beautiful travel destinations on planet earth, these are places from all around the globe that will take your breath away. WatchMojo presents the top 10 most beautiful places in the world. But what will make the top spot on our list? Iguazú Falls, Salar de Uyuni or Moraine Lake? Watch to find out! 00:25 #10. Palawan Island 01:02 #9. Seljalandsfoss 01:41 #8. Plitvice Lakes National Park 02:19 #7. Algar de Benagil 02:55 #6. Cliffs of Moher 03:33 #5. The Great Barrier Reef & Whitehaven Beach 05:13 #4. Antelope Canyon 04:46 #3, #2, #1 ??? For more incredible content from Getty Images, check out their website here: http://www.gettyimages.com/travel To vote for what video we produce next, go to our suggest page here: http://www.watchmojo.com/my/suggest.php Our Magazine!! Learn the inner workings of WatchMojo and meet the voices behind the videos, articles by our specialists from gaming, film, tv, anime and more. VIEW INSTANTLY: http://goo.gl/SivjcX WatchMojo's Social Media Pages http://www.Facebook.com/WatchMojo http://www.Twitter.com/WatchMojo http://instagram.com/watchmojo Get WatchMojo merchandise at shop.watchmojo.com WatchMojo’s ten thousand videos on Top 10 lists, Origins, Biographies, Tips, How To’s, Reviews, Commentary and more on Pop Culture, Celebrity, Movies, Music, TV, Film, Video Games, Politics, News, Comics, Superheroes. Your trusted authority on ranking Pop Culture.
Views: 3235017 WatchMojo.com
Dead Sea and Masada Tour ים המלח מצדה עם צחי שקד- סיור
 
06:09
Zahi Shaked A tour guide in Israel and his camera [email protected] 9726905522 tel סיור עם מורה הדרך ומדריך הטיולים צחי שקד 0546905522 טיול למדבר יהודה מצדה וים המלח. אחלה סרט The Dead Sea Arabic البحر الميت al-Bahr al-Mayyit[3] (help·info), Hebrew: יָם הַ‏‏מֶּ‏‏לַ‏ח‎, Yām Ha-Melaḥ; "Dead Sea" , "Sea of Salt"), also called the Salt Sea, is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east, and Israel and the West Bank to the west. Its surface and shores are 422 metres (1,385 ft) below sea level,[2] the lowest elevation on the Earth's surface on dry land. The Dead Sea is 378 m (1,240 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. It is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, with 33.7% salinity. Only Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond) have a higher salinity. It is 8.6 times more salty than the ocean.[4] This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers. People also use the salt and the minerals from the Dead Sea to create cosmetics and herbal sachets. In 2009, 1.2 million foreign tourists visited on the Israeli side. The sea has a density of 1.24kg/L, making swimming difficult.The Dead Sea is an endorheic lake located in the Jordan Rift Valley, a geographic feature formed by the Dead Sea Transform (DST). This left lateral-moving transform fault lies along the tectonic plate boundary between the African Plate and the Arabian Plate. It runs between the East Anatolian Fault zone in Turkey and the northern end of the Red Sea Rift offshore of the southern tip of Sinai. The Jordan River is the only major water source flowing into the Dead Sea, although there are small perennial springs under and around the Dead Sea, creating pools and quicksand pits along the edges.[7] There are no outlet streams. Rainfall is scarcely 100 mm (3.9 in) per year in the northern part of the Dead Sea and barely 50 mm (2.0 in) in the southern part. The Dead Sea zone's aridity is due to the rainshadow effect of the Judean Hills. The highlands east of the Dead Sea receive more rainfall than the Dead Sea itself. To the west of the Dead Sea, the Judean Hills rise less steeply and are much lower than the mountains to the east. Along the southwestern side of the lake is a 210 m (690 ft) tall halite formation called "Mount Sodom".There are two contending hypotheses about the origin of the low elevation of the Dead Sea. The older hypothesis is that it lies in a true rift zone, an extension of the Red Sea Rift, or even of the Great Rift Valley of eastern Africa. A more recent hypothesis is that the Dead Sea basin is a consequence of a "step-over" discontinuity along the Dead Sea Transform, creating extension of the crust with consequent subsidence. Around three million years ago, what is now the valley of the Jordan River, Dead Sea, and Wadi Arabah was repeatedly inundated by waters from the Mediterranean Sea. The waters formed in a narrow, crooked bay which was connected to the sea through what is now the Jezreel Valley. The floods of the valley came and went depending on long scale climate change. The lake that occupied the Dead Sea Rift, named "Lake Sodom", deposited beds of salt, eventually coming to be 3 km (1.9 mi) thick. Approximately two million years ago, the land between the Rift Valley and the Mediterranean Sea rose to such an extent that the ocean could no longer flood the area. Thus, the long bay became a lake.Masada (Hebrew מצדה, pronounced Metzada (help·info), from מצודה, metzuda, "fortress") is the name for a site of ancient palaces and fortifications in the South District of Israel on top of an isolated rock plateau, or horst, on the eastern edge of the Judean Desert overlooking the Dead Sea. After the First Jewish-Roman War a siege of the fortress by troops of the Roman Empire led to the mass suicide of the Sicarii rebels, who preferred death to surrender. It is located about 20 km east of Arad.
Environmental investments in the Russian Barents region -- NEFCO
 
04:57
Despite excellent cross-border cooperation between the Nordic countries and the Russian Barents region, some serious environmental concerns still remain. The emissions of sulphur oxide and heavy metals from smelters in the Kola peninsula have been one of the main subjects of international environmental cooperation in the Barents region. In 2003, the Nordic Environment Finance Corporation, NEFCO, co-financed a study which identified a number of so called environmental hot spots in the Russian part of the Barents region. The study identified the smelters in Nikel and Zaployarnyi as some of the worst hot spots in the Barents region. In Murmansk, the poor wastewater treatment has also has been identified as one of the region's environmental hot spots. This video shows what NEFCO is doing in order to address the environmental challenges at hand. Learn more about NEFCO: www.nefco.org
Views: 4641 NEFCONordic
Alberta oil sands economics and environmental impact
 
05:00
This video discusses some for the economics of the Alberta oil sands and how they have been affected by the drop in oil prices. It also talks about how this relates to their environmental impact.
Views: 750 Some name
Swimming in the Dead Sea
 
01:10
Views: 132 hosh561
Copper Falls State Park: Environmental Dilemma
 
01:11
Copper Falls State Park in Mellen, WI is a beautiful protected piece of land filled with winding rapids, magnificent water falls, and great hiking trails. Currently (when this video was uploaded) a proposed mining operation could potentially put Copper Falls State Park in harms way. The mining project may (or may not) have negative effects on the Bad River watershed of which the state park is a part of. Please watch this video to witness the beauty of Copper Falls State Park and get informed on the proposed mining operation. Thanks for watching!
Views: 191 ambergassassin
The Dead Sea, Israel tour. Floating at the Mineral Beach Spa
 
04:27
Zahi Shaked A tour guide in Israel and his camera. +972 54 6905522 "Dead Sea" , "Sea of Salt", also called the Salt Sea, is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east, and Israel and the West Bank to the west. Its surface and shores are 422 metres (1,385 ft) below sea level,[2] the lowest elevation on the Earth's surface on dry land. The Dead Sea is 378 m (1,240 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. It is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, with 33.7% salinity. Only Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond) have a higher salinity. It is 8.6 times more salty than the ocean.[4] This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers. People also use the salt and the minerals from the Dead Sea to create cosmetics and herbal sachets. In 2009, 1.2 million foreign tourists visited on the Israeli side. The sea has a density of 1.24kg/L, making swimming difficult.The Dead Sea is an endorheic lake located in the Jordan Rift Valley, a geographic feature formed by the Dead Sea Transform (DST). This left lateral-moving transform fault lies along the tectonic plate boundary between the African Plate and the Arabian Plate. It runs between the East Anatolian Fault zone in Turkey and the northern end of the Red Sea Rift offshore of the southern tip of Sinai. The Jordan River is the only major water source flowing into the Dead Sea, although there are small perennial springs under and around the Dead Sea, creating pools and quicksand pits along the edges.[7] There are no outlet streams. Rainfall is scarcely 100 mm (3.9 in) per year in the northern part of the Dead Sea and barely 50 mm (2.0 in) in the southern part. The Dead Sea zone's aridity is due to the rainshadow effect of the Judean Hills. The highlands east of the Dead Sea receive more rainfall than the Dead Sea itself. To the west of the Dead Sea, the Judean Hills rise less steeply and are much lower than the mountains to the east. Along the southwestern side of the lake is a 210 m (690 ft) tall halite formation called "Mount Sodom".There are two contending hypotheses about the origin of the low elevation of the Dead Sea. The older hypothesis is that it lies in a true rift zone, an extension of the Red Sea Rift, or even of the Great Rift Valley of eastern Africa. A more recent hypothesis is that the Dead Sea basin is a consequence of a "step-over" discontinuity along the Dead Sea Transform, creating extension of the crust with consequent subsidence. Around three million years ago, what is now the valley of the Jordan River, Dead Sea, and Wadi Arabah was repeatedly inundated by waters from the Mediterranean Sea. The waters formed in a narrow, crooked bay which was connected to the sea through what is now the Jezreel Valley. The floods of the valley came and went depending on long scale climate change. The lake that occupied the Dead Sea Rift, named "Lake Sodom", deposited beds of salt, eventually coming to be 3 km (1.9 mi) thick. Approximately two million years ago, the land between the Rift Valley and the Mediterranean Sea rose to such an extent that the ocean could no longer flood the area. Thus, the long bay became a lake.Masada (Hebrew מצדה, pronounced Metzada (help•info), from מצודה, metzuda, "fortress") is the name for a site of ancient palaces and fortifications in the South District of Israel on top of an isolated rock plateau, or horst, on the eastern edge of the Judean Desert overlooking the Dead Sea. After the First Jewish-Roman War a siege of the fortress by troops of the Roman Empire led to the mass suicide of the Sicarii rebels, who preferred death to surrender. It is located about 20 km east of Arad
Mineral Beach -  Dead Sea Spa  - floating with Zahi Shaked 5.10.2011
 
06:09
Zahi Shaked A tour guide in Israel and his camera. +972 54 6905522 "Dead Sea" , "Sea of Salt", also called the Salt Sea, is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east, and Israel and the West Bank to the west. Its surface and shores are 422 metres (1,385 ft) below sea level,[2] the lowest elevation on the Earth's surface on dry land. The Dead Sea is 378 m (1,240 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. It is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, with 33.7% salinity. Only Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond) have a higher salinity. It is 8.6 times more salty than the ocean.[4] This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers. People also use the salt and the minerals from the Dead Sea to create cosmetics and herbal sachets. In 2009, 1.2 million foreign tourists visited on the Israeli side. The sea has a density of 1.24kg/L, making swimming difficult.The Dead Sea is an endorheic lake located in the Jordan Rift Valley, a geographic feature formed by the Dead Sea Transform (DST). This left lateral-moving transform fault lies along the tectonic plate boundary between the African Plate and the Arabian Plate. It runs between the East Anatolian Fault zone in Turkey and the northern end of the Red Sea Rift offshore of the southern tip of Sinai. The Jordan River is the only major water source flowing into the Dead Sea, although there are small perennial springs under and around the Dead Sea, creating pools and quicksand pits along the edges.[7] There are no outlet streams. Rainfall is scarcely 100 mm (3.9 in) per year in the northern part of the Dead Sea and barely 50 mm (2.0 in) in the southern part. The Dead Sea zone's aridity is due to the rainshadow effect of the Judean Hills. The highlands east of the Dead Sea receive more rainfall than the Dead Sea itself. To the west of the Dead Sea, the Judean Hills rise less steeply and are much lower than the mountains to the east. Along the southwestern side of the lake is a 210 m (690 ft) tall halite formation called "Mount Sodom".There are two contending hypotheses about the origin of the low elevation of the Dead Sea. The older hypothesis is that it lies in a true rift zone, an extension of the Red Sea Rift, or even of the Great Rift Valley of eastern Africa. A more recent hypothesis is that the Dead Sea basin is a consequence of a "step-over" discontinuity along the Dead Sea Transform, creating extension of the crust with consequent subsidence. Around three million years ago, what is now the valley of the Jordan River, Dead Sea, and Wadi Arabah was repeatedly inundated by waters from the Mediterranean Sea. The waters formed in a narrow, crooked bay which was connected to the sea through what is now the Jezreel Valley. The floods of the valley came and went depending on long scale climate change. The lake that occupied the Dead Sea Rift, named "Lake Sodom", deposited beds of salt, eventually coming to be 3 km (1.9 mi) thick. Approximately two million years ago, the land between the Rift Valley and the Mediterranean Sea rose to such an extent that the ocean could no longer flood the area. Thus, the long bay became a lake.Masada (Hebrew מצדה, pronounced Metzada (help•info), from מצודה, metzuda, "fortress") is the name for a site of ancient palaces and fortifications in the South District of Israel on top of an isolated rock plateau, or horst, on the eastern edge of the Judean Desert overlooking the Dead Sea. After the First Jewish-Roman War a siege of the fortress by troops of the Roman Empire led to the mass suicide of the Sicarii rebels, who preferred death to surrender. It is located about 20 km east of Arad
Poaching, Drugs, and Murder in Costa Rica: Shell Game (Full Length)
 
34:30
Since sea turtle conservation in Costa Rica began in the 1950s, conservationists and poachers have peacefully shared the beach. But the murder of the environmentalist Jairo Mora Sandoval in 2013 shocked the eco-friendly country and brought attention to a violent overlap between conservationism and drug trafficking in Costa Rica’s abundant national parks and untouched coastlines. With five per cent of the world’s biodiversity, the unique geography of Costa Rica is a hotspot for eco-tourism and conservation work. However, it is that same geography that makes the country so vulnerable to the violent drug trade that surrounds its borders. Costa Rica has become a major transshipment point for drug traffickers, with deadly consequences for those caught in the middle. VICE News travels to Costa Rica to commemorate the two-year anniversary of environmental activist Jairo Mora Sandoval’s tragic death and meet with conservationists, poachers, drug dealers, and law enforcement about the intersecting criminality across the country. Watch "California’s Sea Lion Die-Off” - http://bit.ly/1QbTK4N Read "No One Knows Why 100K Endangered Antelopes Suddenly Died in Kazakhstan” - http://bit.ly/1FF4XAL Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 112742 VICE News
Minister Kubuabola's Remarks at the Welcome Reception for the Korean Ship Araon 26 April 2011.mp4
 
05:28
REMARKS BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS & INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION, HON RATU INOKE KUBUABOLA ON THE OCCASION OF THE VISIT OF KOREAN RESEARCH VESSEL "ARAON", TUESDAY 26TH APRIL 2011 Your Excellency Ambassador Cheong Hae-wook Captain Jong Ryul KIM of the Research Vessel Araon, Scientists and Crew on board the Vessel, Distinguished Guests Ladies and Gentleman Allow me to first of all acknowledge the kind words of welcome from His Excellency Ambassador Cheong Hae-wook. To Captain KIM, the Scientists and Crew of the Vessel "Araon", I say on behalf of all of us: BULA, NAMASTE, HWANGYONG-HAMNIDA AND WELCOME TO FIJI! The vessel "Araon" is visiting us today after conducting research and deep sea survey in Tonga for the last one and half month. I understand the vessel is now on its way back to its homeport in Korea and should be returning later in the year to conduct research and deep sea survey in Fiji if all goes according to plan. The potential for seabed mining in the Pacific Island region is significant. The Cook Islands EEZ, for example, is believed to contain some 7.5 million metric tons of manganese nodules, a potential source of 32 million metric tons of cobalt, or 520 years of supply at current world demand. Cobalt-rich manganese crusts deposits have been found in the Federal States of Micronesia and the Marshall Islands. Polymetallic sulphide deposits have been discovered in the Lau Basin in Fiji and Tonga's EEZ, and in the Manus and Woodlark Basins in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands. Indications that the Pacific polymetallic sulphide deposits may have a high gold content, with the extracted value potentially as high as US$2,000 per square meter, has led to an increase in foreign investors' interest in the Pacific. Seabed mining presents both an immense opportunity and an immense challenge for us in the Pacific. For us our livelihood and culture is based around these oceans, and it is an inseparable part of our culture, identity and way of life. Our lives are interconnected with the cycles of the sea, it is our calendar and we are dependent on it for our survival. The protection of our ocean and our coastal areas therefore is of the utmost importance to all of us and our future generations. In this regard we welcome research activities such as by the "Araon" as it will help in our understanding of our sea bed environment, the currents, the ecology and its true value. Recognizing that seabed mining poses a very different set of challenges from land mining the Fiji Government has recently taken a number of deliberative measures to ensure the orderly development of this sector of our economy. Government has for instance recently developed its Off Shore Mining Policy to guide the development of this sector. Government has also recently amended our Mining Act to provide cover for deep sea mining exploration in Fiji waters. In June this year Fiji will be joining other Pacific island states in Nadi under a European Union funded four-year regional Deep Sea Minerals Project designed to address the policy and legal requirements of Pacific Island Countries deep sea mining exploration. All these efforts are aimed at protecting our oceans regenerative capacity as we explore its bountiful harvest. The visit today of the "Araon" is part of this overall process. The Fijian Government is hopeful that cooperation in the area of marine and oceanic research will be another feature of our bilateral relations with the Korean Government. We are therefore hopeful that officials from our Mineral Resources Department will be able to join their colleagues from Korea on board the Araon when it next visits Fiji for deep sea survey next year. Excellencies Ladies and Gentleman Allow me to conclude by bidding Captain Jong Ryul KIM and the Scientists and Crew onboard the Research Vessel Araon, safe travel as you return to your home tomorrow. May your efforts in improving our understanding of our oceans contribute to the peaceful utilization and development of this rare ecosystem to the benefit of all our people. VINAKA VAKLALEVU, DHANIYAVAD, KAMSAHAMNIDA, AND THANK YOU. END
Views: 460 foreignaffairsfiji
Inside The Three Gorges Dam A Man Made Disaster
 
08:11
When it officially became fully functional on July 4, 2012, China hailed the Three Gorges Dam, the world’s largest power station with 22,500 megawatts of installed capacity as a resounding success. They pointed to it's modern, highly efficient turbines, it's ability to increase shipping capacity along the Yangtze River and the fact that it could help to prevent downstream flooding by freeing up flood storage space. Not only all of this, but it was a move towards limiting greenhouse gas emissions. Sounds great, but, there are two sides to every story and the negative consequences of this monumental project, which cost the country the equivalent of around 25 billion U.S. dollars have been described by many as catastrophic both in its human and environmental impacts. Over one million people were displaced and the dam flooded historically significant archeological and cultural sites. Entire ecosystems were permanently altered with rare plant and animal life being pushed to the brink of extinction. Experts warned that the increased pressure such a massive structure would create on the surrounding land would trigger massive landslides and an increased risk of earthquakes, and their eerie predictions seem to be coming true. We’ll break down the story behind what has become without a doubt one of the most controversial pieces of infrastructure ever built by humankind, The Three Gorges Dam. Subscribe to Knowledge Feed for awesome mysteries, discoveries, fun topics and all around AWESOME videos ! Pros The dam has plenty of positive impacts, it wasn’t built just to cause landslides and displace millions. At full power the Three Gorges is capable of reducing coal consumption by over 30 million tonnes a year, thereby avoiding some 100 million tonnes of gas emissions and ten thousand tonnes of carbon monoxide. The presence of ship locks and even ship elevators believe it or not, allows giant vessels to traverse the Yangtze, boosting the country’s economy as a result. While the Chinese government hoped that the dam would provide power to 10% of people in China electricity demand in the country became much higher than expected and less than 2 percent of the population receive power through the dam today. Another positive impact of the dam, if you were to ask government officials would be it's ability to prevent a very real and very serious threat to the millions surrounding and directly affected by the Yangtze, Floods The Dam’s top priority, it seemed was in preventing the catastrophic floods that occur along the Yangtze, land that is populated by millions of people. In August of 1931 following a year of above average rainfall the Yangtze flooded. 500 square miles surrounding the river were submerged. Entire rice crops were destroyed. Without this essential food thousands in major cities like Nanjing starved following the catastrophe. All told over three and a half million lives were claimed in the months following the floods. More recently in 1998, a series of floods that lasted from June to September left 3,700 people dead, 15 million homeless and caused nearly 25 billion dollars in economic losses. 13 million homes were damaged or broken beyond repair. Now, government officials tout the dams apparent ability to prevent such catastrophes. The general public and especially those that live in areas near the Yangtze aren’t so sure. Flooding last year was the worst since 1998, leaving hundreds dead. Critics pointed to the dam and its failure to prevent the disaster. The 2016 floods were bad and only time will tell if the Three Gorges is capable of preventing an event as devastating as 1998, or scarier still something more along the lines of what transpired in 1931. This dam is so freaking big, some experts out there think it's sheer mass and the changes in water level it creates could actually cause Earthquakes The paths of major fault lines lie directly underneath the Three Gorges. Experts believed that the dam, as a result could cause a significant increase in seismic activity. As you know by now the dam was built despite these and many other concerns, some of which we’ve gone over. A study done by the China Earthquake Administration, a government entity showed that the experts were right. They registered 3,429 earthquakes around the reservoir between mid 2003 and the end of 2009, 30 times the frequency recorded during pre-dam periods. People fear a large earthquake and it's potential consequences as it relates to the dam. If the dam itself were to be damaged during a huge earthquake, for instance, the results would surely be devastating for the millions living in close proximity. Thanks everyone for joining us on our Knowledge Feedy look at the Three Gorges Dam. We hope that we’ve tipped the richter scales within you a bit and we can’t wait for you to join us on our next video. Good night and good luck.
Views: 1364232 Knowledge Feed
The Dead Sea - floating in the lowest place in the world with Zahi Shaked 9.9.2011
 
06:33
Zahi Shaked A tour guide in Israel and his camera. +972 54 6905522 "Dead Sea" , "Sea of Salt", also called the Salt Sea, is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east, and Israel and the West Bank to the west. Its surface and shores are 422 metres (1,385 ft) below sea level,[2] the lowest elevation on the Earth's surface on dry land. The Dead Sea is 378 m (1,240 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. It is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, with 33.7% salinity. Only Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond) have a higher salinity. It is 8.6 times more salty than the ocean.[4] This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers. People also use the salt and the minerals from the Dead Sea to create cosmetics and herbal sachets. In 2009, 1.2 million foreign tourists visited on the Israeli side. The sea has a density of 1.24kg/L, making swimming difficult.The Dead Sea is an endorheic lake located in the Jordan Rift Valley, a geographic feature formed by the Dead Sea Transform (DST). This left lateral-moving transform fault lies along the tectonic plate boundary between the African Plate and the Arabian Plate. It runs between the East Anatolian Fault zone in Turkey and the northern end of the Red Sea Rift offshore of the southern tip of Sinai. The Jordan River is the only major water source flowing into the Dead Sea, although there are small perennial springs under and around the Dead Sea, creating pools and quicksand pits along the edges.[7] There are no outlet streams. Rainfall is scarcely 100 mm (3.9 in) per year in the northern part of the Dead Sea and barely 50 mm (2.0 in) in the southern part. The Dead Sea zone's aridity is due to the rainshadow effect of the Judean Hills. The highlands east of the Dead Sea receive more rainfall than the Dead Sea itself. To the west of the Dead Sea, the Judean Hills rise less steeply and are much lower than the mountains to the east. Along the southwestern side of the lake is a 210 m (690 ft) tall halite formation called "Mount Sodom".There are two contending hypotheses about the origin of the low elevation of the Dead Sea. The older hypothesis is that it lies in a true rift zone, an extension of the Red Sea Rift, or even of the Great Rift Valley of eastern Africa. A more recent hypothesis is that the Dead Sea basin is a consequence of a "step-over" discontinuity along the Dead Sea Transform, creating extension of the crust with consequent subsidence. Around three million years ago, what is now the valley of the Jordan River, Dead Sea, and Wadi Arabah was repeatedly inundated by waters from the Mediterranean Sea. The waters formed in a narrow, crooked bay which was connected to the sea through what is now the Jezreel Valley. The floods of the valley came and went depending on long scale climate change. The lake that occupied the Dead Sea Rift, named "Lake Sodom", deposited beds of salt, eventually coming to be 3 km (1.9 mi) thick. Approximately two million years ago, the land between the Rift Valley and the Mediterranean Sea rose to such an extent that the ocean could no longer flood the area. Thus, the long bay became a lake.Masada (Hebrew מצדה, pronounced Metzada (help•info), from מצודה, metzuda, "fortress") is the name for a site of ancient palaces and fortifications in the South District of Israel on top of an isolated rock plateau, or horst, on the eastern edge of the Judean Desert overlooking the Dead Sea. After the First Jewish-Roman War a siege of the fortress by troops of the Roman Empire led to the mass suicide of the Sicarii rebels, who preferred death to surrender. It is located about 20 km east of Arad
Top 10 Eco-Tourism Destinations in India | Eco Tourism
 
04:31
Moving away from the shambles of the messy daily life, everyone wishes to have that one holiday where they feel the warmth of nature and admire the grace of the lush green fields or mountains in front of them. Here are the top 10 most searched ecotourism sites for June 2018, which are surely going to imprint the love for nature in your heart. Look out for ranking changes based on searches in Jan 2019.
Views: 4413 GnY TV
GRUMMAN PICCARD PX-15 SUBMERSIBLE BEN FRANKLIN  GULF STREAM RESEARCH MISSION 32934
 
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This historic film "Thirty Days Beneath the Sea" profiles the mission of the mesoscaphe Ben Franklin, also known as the Grumman/Piccard PX-15. Built by Grumman Aerospace, Ben Franklin was a manned underwater submersible built in 1968. It was the brainchild of explorer and inventor Jacques Piccard who named the vessel after Franklin because he was the first person to chart the Gulf Stream. The research vessel was designed to house a six-man crew for up to 30 days of oceanographic study in the depths of the Gulf Stream. NASA became involved, seeing this as an opportunity to study the effects of long-term, continuous close confinement, a useful simulation of long space flights. The Ben Franklin was built between 1966 and 1968 at the Giovanola fabrication plant in Monthey, Switzerland by Piccard and the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation headed by Donald B Terrana, then disassembled and shipped to Florida. The vessel is the first submarine to be built to American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) standards. With a design crush depth of 4,000 feet (1,200 m), it was designed to drift along at neutral buoyancy at depths between 600 and 2,000 feet (180 and 610 metres). The 130-ton ship has four external electric propulsion pods, primarily used for altitude trimming. It is powered by tons of lead batteries stored outside the hull. Its length is 48 feet 9 inches (14.86 m), with a beam of 21 feet 6 inches (6.55 m) and a height of 20 feet (6.1 m). Piccard insisted on 29 observation portholes, despite the objections of engineers over the inclusion of potentially fatal weak points. The vessel began its voyage on July 14, 1969 -- two days before Apollo launched -- off Palm Beach, Florida (where the Gulf Stream has its fastest point), with Piccard as the mission leader and with NASA observer Chester "Chet" May on board. The sub descended to 1,000 feet off of Riviera Beach, Florida and drifted 1,400 miles north with the current for more than four weeks. Accompanied by surface support vessels, it resurfaced on August 14, 1,444 miles (2,324 km) away, 300 miles (480 km) south of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. In addition to studying the warm water current which flows northeast off the U.S. East Coast, the sub also made space exploration history by studying the behavior of aquanauts in a sealed, self-contained, self-sufficient capsule for NASA. During the course of the dive, NASA conducted exhaustive analyses of virtually every aspect of onboard life. They measured sleep quality and patterns, sense of humor and behavioral shifts, physical reflexes, and the effects of a long-term routine on the crew. The submarine's record-shattering dive influenced the design of Apollo and Skylab missions and continued to guide NASA scientists as they devised future manned space-flight missions. e Ben Franklin made a few more dives after 1969, including the first deep-sea dive for Robert Ballard, the discoverer of the wreck of the Titanic. After running aground on a reef in 1971, the Ben Franklin was sold to Vancouver businessman John Horton, only to languish for nearly three decades on the North Shore. In December 1999, with a sudden decision to either move or scrap the submersible, it was offered to the Vancouver Maritime Museum. After refurbishment, the submersible was placed in front of the museum. The crew of the vessel included: Jacques Piccard, the senior scientist on board, as well as the designer and engineer of the vessel. Frank Busby and Kenneth Haigh from the Naval Oceanographic Office. Chester May was a NASA scientist in charge of observing the crew. Don Kazimir was the Chief Pilot, and a former navy submarine officer. Erwin Aebersold was an associate of Jacques' and co-pilot to Don. Today, NASA continues the underwater tradition with the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations program -- known by its acronym "NEEMO." Today's aquanauts are studying equipment and procedures that could prove useful as NASA pursues the new Vision for Space Exploration. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1313 PeriscopeFilm
International Dive Industries Launch Call For Action In Palau
 
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A call to action has been launched in Palau urging governments and international treaties to “address threats to the world’s oceans faster and more efficiently”. Entitled “Letter from – Dive Industry Declaration on Marine Conservation”, this declaration is supported by dozens of dive industry stakeholders from 34 countries. The declaration spearheaded by Divers for Sharks, co-founded by Jose Truda Palazzo, Jr. of Brazil applauded Palau and President Remengesau’s leadership for creating various initiatives and marine protected areas safeguarding the ocean and creatures within. But calls for attention to the threats that climate change poses on the world’s oceans. “We request that the dive industry’s interests and the livelihoods of the island and coastal peoples with whom we work be considered by climate negotiators from all countries and that a final, binding and effective agreement on this serious issue is reached still in 2015”, the letter urges. In addition to their request for closer attention to climate change impacts, dive industry stakeholders expressed deep concerns for overfishing practices particularly of sharks, rays and sea turtles. Threatened by overfishing and unsustainable fishing practices, the declaration further urges fisheries officials to include the interests of non-extractive users of the oceans when making decisions. Signatories of the declaration include dive shops from Palau, Federated States of Micronesia, Brazil, U.S., Argentina and many others. The letter was presented to Umiich Sengebau Minister of Natural Resources, Environment and Tourism on March 10, 2015.
Views: 609 OceaniaTV (OTV)
Stanford Earth scientists explore ancient submarine canyon remains
 
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Tourists flock to Point Lobos State Natural Reserve near Monterey, Calif., for its breathtaking coastal views and glimpses of the playful sea otters and other marine mammals that can be found among its waters. But the site has long attracted geologists for a very different reason: The weathered rock cropping and loose gravel that line its shores are actually the remains of an ancient, uplifted submarine canyon that served as a mighty conduit for sediments flowing from beaches and rivers into the deep ocean 55 million years ago. For close to 30 years, Stanford Earth geologists Stephen Graham and Donald Lowe have been bringing students to Point Lobos for the insights provided by the site into the powerful but cryptic geologic processes that help shape the Earth’s seafloor. The site is also of interest to energy companies, because submarine canyons are ideal “petroleum traps” where organic matter can, through time and pressure, be converted into pockets of oil and natural gas. Point Lobos provides a rare opportunity to study the geologic circumstances that enable this transformation, and the findings could help make oil and gas exploration more efficient and safer, both for workers and for the environment. See the uplifted geological features of the deep sea floor in this video for yourself.
Views: 1981 stanfordearth
CELCOR begins Fight Against Coal Mining in PNG
 
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The Centre for Environment Law and Community Rights today (19 November, 2018) launched a “No Coal in PNG” Campaign to raise awareness against the use of coal as an energy source in PNG. This comes after the government of PNG granted an exploration license for coal exploration in the provinces of Gulf and Morobe. Coal produces 72 percent of Carbon Dioxide gas, which affects the atmosphere and contributes to climate change and global warming. - visit us on http//www.emtv.com.pg for more news....
Views: 98 EMTV Online