Home
Search results “Depletion allowance mining company”
How to Calculate Depreciation
 
05:22
Help us learn more about your experience by completing this short survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RRKS8LZ Subscribe to Alanis Business Academy on YouTube for updates on the latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/alanisbusinessacademy?sub_confirmation=1 Depreciation is an accounting term that refers to allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life. Done for both accounting and tax purposes, several methods of depreciation exist. A common and simple method of depreciating an asset is the straight line depreciation method. In this video we'll walk through how to calculate depreciation using the straight line method. To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P
Views: 140287 Alanis Business Academy
Mining industry of Ghana | Wikipedia audio article
 
47:14
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_industry_of_Ghana 00:00:52 1 Economic impact 00:02:06 2 Government policies and programs 00:06:20 3 Industry structure 00:08:14 4 Commodities 00:08:23 4.1 Aluminum, bauxite, and alumina 00:10:30 4.2 Gold 00:22:49 4.3 Manganese 00:25:11 4.4 Diamond 00:30:39 4.5 Cement 00:31:20 4.6 Petroleum 00:34:48 5 Environmental impact 00:38:34 6 History 00:46:26 6.1 Accidents 00:46:58 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9018217069732137 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Mining industry of Ghana accounts for 5% of the country's GDP and minerals make up 37% of total exports, of which gold contributes over 90% of the total mineral exports. Thus, the main focus of Ghana's mining and minerals development industry remains focused on gold. Ghana is Africa's largest gold producer, producing 80.5 t in 2008. Ghana is also a major producer of bauxite, manganese and diamonds. Ghana has 23 large-scale mining companies producing gold, diamonds, bauxite and manganese, and, there are also over 300 registered small scale mining groups and 90 mine support service companies.Other mineral commodities produced in the country are natural gas, petroleum, salt, and silver.
Views: 23 wikipedia tts
Nickel | Wikipedia audio article
 
36:58
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Nickel 00:03:13 1 Properties 00:03:22 1.1 Atomic and physical properties 00:04:14 1.1.1 Electron configuration dispute 00:05:07 1.2 Isotopes 00:05:38 1.3 Occurrence 00:08:52 2 Compounds 00:10:28 2.1 Nickel(0) 00:10:52 2.2 Nickel(I) 00:11:34 2.3 Nickel(II) 00:12:19 2.4 Nickel(III) and (IV) 00:14:12 3 History 00:15:06 4 Coinage 00:17:32 4.1 Canada 00:17:48 4.2 Switzerland 00:18:27 4.3 United Kingdom 00:18:41 4.4 United States 00:18:56 4.5 Current use 00:19:44 5 World production 00:20:22 6 Extraction and purification 00:21:41 6.1 Electrorefining 00:23:00 6.2 Mond process 00:23:21 6.3 Metal value 00:24:45 7 Applications 00:26:14 8 Biological role 00:29:30 9 Toxicity 00:31:56 10 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Nickel is a chemical element with symbol Ni and atomic number 28. It is a silvery-white lustrous metal with a slight golden tinge. Nickel belongs to the transition metals and is hard and ductile. Pure nickel, powdered to maximize the reactive surface area, shows a significant chemical activity, but larger pieces are slow to react with air under standard conditions because an oxide layer forms on the surface and prevents further corrosion (passivation). Even so, pure native nickel is found in Earth's crust only in tiny amounts, usually in ultramafic rocks, and in the interiors of larger nickel–iron meteorites that were not exposed to oxygen when outside Earth's atmosphere. Meteoric nickel is found in combination with iron, a reflection of the origin of those elements as major end products of supernova nucleosynthesis. An iron–nickel mixture is thought to compose Earth's inner core.Use of nickel (as a natural meteoric nickel–iron alloy) has been traced as far back as 3500 BCE. Nickel was first isolated and classified as a chemical element in 1751 by Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, who initially mistook the ore for a copper mineral, in the cobalt mines of Los, Hälsingland, Sweden. The element's name comes from a mischievous sprite of German miner mythology, Nickel (similar to Old Nick), who personified the fact that copper-nickel ores resisted refinement into copper. An economically important source of nickel is the iron ore limonite, which often contains 1–2% nickel. Nickel's other important ore minerals include pentlandite and a mixture of Ni-rich natural silicates known as garnierite. Major production sites include the Sudbury region in Canada (which is thought to be of meteoric origin), New Caledonia in the Pacific, and Norilsk in Russia. Nickel is slowly oxidized by air at room temperature and is considered corrosion-resistant. Historically, it has been used for plating iron and brass, coating chemistry equipment, and manufacturing certain alloys that retain a high silvery polish, such as German silver. About 9% of world nickel production is still used for corrosion-resistant nickel plating. Nickel-plated objects sometimes provoke nickel allergy. Nickel has been widely used in coins, though its rising price has led to some replacement with cheaper metals in recent years. Nickel is one of four elements (the others are iron, cobalt, and gadolinium) that are ferromagnetic at approximately room temperature. Alnico permanent magnets based partly on nickel are of intermediate strength between iron-based permanent magnets and rare-earth magnets. The metal is valuable in modern times chiefly in alloys; about 68% of world production is used in stainless steel. A further 10% is used for nickel-based and copper-based alloys, 7% for alloy steels, 3% in foundries, 9% in plating and 4% in other applications, including the fast-growing battery sector. As a compound, nickel has a number of niche chemical manufacturing uses, such as a catalyst for hydrogenation, cathodes for batteries, pigments and metal surface treatments. Nickel is an essential nutrient for some microorganisms and plants that have enzymes with nickel as an active site.
Views: 13 wikipedia tts
Annuities Lead the Pursuit to Predictable Income - Right on the Money -  Part 3 of 5
 
10:26
Sub Headline: Bonds’ low returns and risks of rising rates have investors seeking shelter. Synopsis: High concentrations in low-return bond allocations can spell portfolio stagnation. Retirees now realize that the traditional 4% safe withdrawal rate is less than 3%. Annuities offer relief, but the value of income riders as a defense against inflation is questioned. Content: Pressure to both preserve principal and generate income have retirees in a quandary. Having spent their portfolio accumulation years under the assumption that bonds were a safe option that could provide a 6% - 8% annual return, many are experiencing closer to 2%. These retirees have neither the time nor the risk tolerance for a significant bond turnaround. Compounding matters is the realization that an assumed annual safe withdrawal rate of 4% of assets is closer to 2.8%. This 30% annual reduction can cost retirees $12,000 annually – the difference between $40,000 and $28,000 – from an original million-dollar nest egg. Commonly known as the gauge of assets’ endurance for a lifetime, there’s still a 10% risk of depletion at the 2.8% withdrawal rate. Adoption of fixed index annuities featuring guaranteed lifetime income and principal-protection measures has steadily grown in recent years. Many factors affect both the cost and benefit including the principal investment, years until initial payout and the amount to be paid monthly or annually. Income riders are an optional item for purchase, and can serve as a hedge against inflation and the uncertainty of any cost-of-living allowance from Social Security. COLA’s have been a no-show in several recent years, and 0.3% annualized for 2017, barely merit a monthly cup of coffee for many recipients. Given these circumstances, it’s initially logical to think of income riders as a no-brainer. However, some advisers – perhaps a minority – have begun to question their inclusion based on the cost/value relationship. They reason that riders reduce withdrawal percentage rates to the point that there’s little difference in the monthly payout, and that by eliminating the rider, there’s no fee, and the time will come sooner for the insurance company to subsidize the monthly withdrawals. Because annuities vary by carrier and are highly customizable, it behooves investors to gain all available knowledge with the help of an expert to determine if an annuity is a suitable solution for achieving predictable income. Steve Savant interviews top retirement specialists in their field of expertise. This segment features retirement specialist Spencer Frankenberger. Right on the Money is a financial talk show distributed in daily video press releases to over 280 media outlets and social media networks. (www.rightonthemoneyshow.com) https://youtu.be/WVjp6z3Hdgw
MIT Clean Tech/GABA Lecture with Dr. Hermann Scheer
 
01:26:11
German American Business Association of California, Inc. and the MIT Club of Northern California Clean Technology Program invite you to this joint event. Towards Energy Autonomy New Politics for Renewable Energy. This is also the topic of Hermann Scheer's latest book. Hermann Scheer will discuss how policy models fostering renewable energy can pave the way for energy autonomy. He will also discuss the current trends regarding the upcoming review of the German EEG (feed-in-tariff) which is due by the end of 2007 / beginning 2008 and which has created the largest solar energy market in the world.
Views: 27363 Google
McCarthyism Made Us Veer Away From a Systemic Doctrine for Change - Ralph Nader on RAI (1/3)
 
24:40
On Reality Asserts Itself with Paul Jay, Ralph Nader says McCarthy's reign of terror made people seek more empirical change, we went after auto companies - no "ism" there see other parts http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=11229
Views: 17766 The Real News Network
Mod-22 Lec-26 Depreciation Accounting (Contd.)
 
50:00
Economics / Management / Entrepreneurhip by Prof. P.K.J. Mohapatra, Department of Nanotechnology, IITKharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 795 nptelhrd
JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES: The Economic Consequences of the Peace FULL Audiobook
 
05:41:52
JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES: The Economic Consequences of the Peace FULL Audiobook - The Economic Consequences of the Peace (1919) is a book written and published by John Maynard Keynes. Keynes attended the Versailles Conference as a delegate of the British Treasury and argued for a much more generous peace. It was a bestseller throughout the world and was critical in establishing a general opinion that the Versailles Treaty was a "Carthaginian peace". It helped to consolidate American public opinion against the treaty and involvement in the League of Nations. The perception by much of the British public that Germany had been treated unfairly in turn was a crucial factor in public support for appeasement. The success of the book established Keynes' reputation as a leading economist especially on the left. When Keynes was a key player in establishing the Bretton Woods system in 1944, he remembered the lessons from Versailles as well as the Great Depression. The Marshall Plan after Second World War is a similar system to that proposed by Keynes in The Economic Consequences of the Peace. The book was released in late 1919 and became an immediate bestseller on both sides of the Atlantic: it was released in the US in 1920. The scathing sketches of Wilson, Lloyd George and Clemenceau proved to be very popular and the work established Keynes' reputation with the public as a leading economist. In six months, the book had sold 100,000 copies with translations into 12 languages. It restored Keynes' reputation with the Bloomsbury Group which had been tarnished by his work for the treasury during the war. Keynes returned to Cambridge to work as an economist where he was regarded as the leading student of Alfred Marshall.(summary adapted from wikipedia.org - Attribution: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Economic_Consequences_of_the_Peace&action=history) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - Become a FRIEND: Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/GreatestAudioBooks Google+: - READ along by clicking (CC) for Closed Caption Transcript! - LISTEN to the entire audiobook for free! Chapter listing and length: 01 - Chapter 1 Preface and Introductory -- 00:07:49 02 - Chapter 2 Europe Before the War -- 00:22:01 03 - Chapter 3 The Conference -- 00:36:08 04 - Chapter 4A The Treaty -- 00:31:06 05 - Chapter 4B The Treaty -- 00:30:57 06 - Chapter 5A Reparations -- 00:24:17 07 - Chapter 5B Reparations -- 00:38:59 08 - Chapter 5C Reparations -- 00:43:19 09 - Chapter 5D Reparations -- 00:21:03 10 - Chapter 6 Europe After the Treaty -- 00:30:31 11 - Chapter 7 Remedies -- 00:35:51 12 - Chapter 7B Remedies -- 00:19:17 Total running time: 5:41:18 Read by Graham McMillan In addition to the reader, this audio book was produced by: Meta-Coordinator/Cataloging: MaryAnn This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org. This video: Copyright 2013. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved.
Views: 16867 Greatest AudioBooks
What is Depreciation? | Definition of Depreciation
 
23:24
What is Depreciation? | Definition of Depreciation: In accountancy, depreciation refers to two aspects of the same concept:  The decrease in value of assets (fair value depreciation)  The allocation of the cost of assets to periods in which the assets are used (depreciation with the matching principle) Depreciation is a method of reallocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life span of it being in motion. Businesses depreciate long-term assets for both tax and accounting purpose. The former affects the balance sheet of a business or entity, and the latter affects the net income that they report. Generally the cost is allocated, as depreciation expense, among the periods in which the asset is expected to be used. This expense is recognized by businesses for financial reporting and tax purposes. Methods of computing depreciation, and the periods over which assets are depreciated, may vary between asset types within the same business and may vary for tax purposes. These may be specified by law or accounting standards, which may vary by country. There are several standard methods of computing depreciation expense, including fixed percentage, straight line, and declining balance methods. Depreciation expense generally begins when the asset is placed in service. For example, a depreciation expense of 100 per year for five years may be recognized for an asset costing 500. Accounting concept: In determining the profits (net income) from an activity, the receipts from the activity must be reduced by appropriate costs. One such cost is the cost of assets used but not immediately consumed in the activity. Such cost so allocated in a given period is equal to the reduction in the value placed on the asset, which is initially equal to the amount paid for the asset and subsequently may or may not be related to the amount expected to be received upon its disposal. Depreciation is any method of allocating such net cost to those periods in which the organization is expected to benefit from use of the asset. The asset is referred to as a depreciable asset. Depreciation is technically a method of allocation, not valuation, even though it determines the value placed on the asset in the balance sheet. Any business or income producing activity using tangible assets may incur costs related to those assets. If an asset is expected to produce a benefit in future periods, some of these costs must be deferred rather than treated as a current expense. The business then records depreciation expense in its financial reporting as the current period's allocation of such costs. This is usually done in a rational and systematic manner. Generally this involves four criteria:  cost of the asset,  expected salvage value, also known as residual value of the assets,  estimated useful life of the asset, and  a method of apportioning the cost over such life. ………………………………………………………………………………….. Sources: Text: Text of this video has been taken from Wikipedia, which is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Views: 94 Free Audio Books
Copper | Wikipedia audio article
 
48:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Copper Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper is one of the few metals that can occur in nature in a directly usable metallic form (native metals). This led to very early human use in several regions, from c. 8000 BC. Thousands of years later, it was the first metal to be smelted from sulfide ores, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c. 4000 BC and the first metal to be purposefully alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, c. 3500 BC.In the Roman era, copper was principally mined on Cyprus, the origin of the name of the metal, from aes сyprium (metal of Cyprus), later corrupted to сuprum (Latin), from which the words derived, coper (Old English) and copper, first used around 1530.The commonly encountered compounds are copper(II) salts, which often impart blue or green colors to such minerals as azurite, malachite, and turquoise, and have been used widely and historically as pigments. Copper used in buildings, usually for roofing, oxidizes to form a green verdigris (or patina). Copper is sometimes used in decorative art, both in its elemental metal form and in compounds as pigments. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic agents, fungicides, and wood preservatives. Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustaceans, copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. In humans, copper is found mainly in the liver, muscle, and bone. The adult body contains between 1.4 and 2.1 mg of copper per kilogram of body weight.
Views: 26 wikipedia tts
History of Newfoundland and Labrador | Wikipedia audio article
 
55:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of Newfoundland and Labrador Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The first brief European contact with Newfoundland and Labrador came about 1000 AD when the Vikings briefly settled in L'Anse aux Meadows. Around 1500, European explorers and fishermen from England, Portugal, Netherlands, France, and Spain (mainly Basques) began exploration. Fishing expeditions came seasonally; the first small permanent settlements appeared around 1630. Catholic-Protestant religious tensions were high but mellowed after 1860. The British colony voted against joining Canada in 1869 and became an independent dominion in the early 20th century. Fishing was always the dominant industry, but the economy collapsed in the Great Depression of the 1930s and the people voluntarily relinquished their independence to become a British colony again. Prosperity and self-confidence returned during the Second World War, and after intense debate the people voted to join Canada in 1949. Poverty and emigration have remained significant themes in Newfoundland history, despite efforts to modernize after 1949. Most efforts failed, and the sudden collapse of the cod fishing industry was a terrific blow in the 1990s. The oil boom in the '00's has revived the economy, but the benefits are not distributed evenly. Over the second half of the 20th century, the historic cultural and political tensions between British Protestants and Irish Catholics faded, and a new spirit of a unified Newfoundland identity has recently emerged through songs and popular culture.
Views: 27 wikipedia tts
Funding Conservation in North Carolina
 
01:24:31
Fred Stanback, in partnership with his wife Alice, is one of North Carolina’s leading supporters of conservation initiatives. They fund the Nicholas School of the Environment’s Stanback Internship Program. Since the program’s inception in 1996, over 1,300 undergraduate and graduate students have benefited. The Stanback Internship Program has grown into a thriving partnership between Duke and scores of organizations throughout the country. Mr. Stanback is joined by Tom Lambeth, Director Emeritus of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, and Sanford Professor Joel Fleishman. More information on the Stanback Internship Program: https://nicholas.duke.edu/career/for-students/stanback
Views: 197 DukeSanfordSchool
Frank Holmes on gold, bitcoin, oil, bonds, & the "love trade" // investing cryptocurrency ethereum
 
16:56
Frank Holmes on gold, bitcoin, oil, bonds, & the "love trade" // investing cryptocurrency ethereum cryptocurrencies trading finance stocks stock market 2017 You can visit Mr. Holmes at http://usfunds.com/ USFunds.com and read the Frank Talk blog at http://usfunds.com/investor-library/frank-talk/ Also visit Mr. Holmes on social media: Twitter: @USFunds Facebook: facebook.com/usfunds Instagram: usglobal Mr. Holmes' personal Twitter: @bulldogholmes Want help from David Moadel? Contact me at davidmoadel @ gmail . com Subscribe to my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUoWjpemcumDyh95Z9KPEdA?sub_confirmation=1 Plenty of stock / options / finance education videos here: https://davidmoadel.blogspot.com/ Disclaimer: I am not licensed or registered to provide financial or investment advice. My videos, presentations, and writing are only for entertainment purposes, and are not intended as investment advice. I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided. hedge fund investing, financial advisor, financial adviser, day trading, day trader, day trading strategies, day trading for beginners, day trading stocks, day trading penny stocks, day tading live, day trading setup, day trading academy, day trading options, day trading for dummies, day trading for a living, day trading basics, day trading 101, how to day trade, how to day trade for beginners, how to day trade stocks, how to day trade penny stocks, how to day trade options, how to day trade for beginners, day trader interview, options trading for beginners stock market for beginners stocks for beginners stock investing stock market investing options trading strategies stock trading strategies stock investing penny stocks penny stock trading nasdaq apple twitter education rsi bollinger bands $SPY $QQQ $AAPL $TWTR SPY QQQ AAPL TWTR forex david moadel trading traders investing investors stock charts, volatility investing, retail sector trading, stock market experts, stock market interview, Stock market volatility lessons for better trading, UVXY VXX TVIX trading options 101, vix trading, vix index, vix volatility, uvxy trading, uvxy stock, uvxy options, uvxy explained, uvxy technical analysis, market volatility, stock market volatility, stock volatility, vix trading strategies, trading vix options, trading vix futures, trading the vix, tvix stock, tvix explained, vxx trading, vxx stock, vxx etf, vxx options, vxx explained, xiv stock, options volatility, options volatility trading, options implied volatility, market volatility explained, shorting the vix
Views: 680 David Moadel
Biosequestration | Wikipedia audio article
 
33:16
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biosequestration 00:01:32 1 The importance of plants in storing atmospheric carbon dioxide 00:02:52 2 Reforestation, avoided deforestation and LULUCF 00:14:17 3 Enhanced photosynthesis 00:16:23 4 Biochar 00:18:19 5 Improved agricultural and farming practices 00:21:14 6 Biosequestration and climate change policy 00:26:11 7 Philosophical basis of biosequestration 00:27:08 8 Barriers to increased global biosequestration 00:32:36 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7472758473137385 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biosequestration is the capture and storage of the atmospheric greenhouse gas carbon dioxide by biological processes. This may be by increased photosynthesis (through practices such as reforestation / preventing deforestation and genetic engineering); by enhanced soil carbon trapping in agriculture; or by the use of algal bio sequestration (see algae bioreactor) to absorb the carbon dioxide emissions from coal, petroleum (oil) or natural gas-fired electricity generation. Biosequestration as a natural process has occurred in the past, and was responsible for the formation of the extensive coal and oil deposits which are now being burned. It is a key policy concept in the climate change mitigation debate. It does not generally refer to the sequestering of carbon dioxide in oceans (see carbon sequestration and ocean acidification) or rock formations, depleted oil or gas reservoirs (see oil depletion and peak oil), deep saline aquifers, or deep coal seams (see coal mining) (for all see geosequestration) or through the use of industrial chemical carbon dioxide scrubbing.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Biosequestration | Wikipedia audio article
 
29:38
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biosequestration 00:01:23 1 The importance of plants in storing atmospheric carbon dioxide 00:02:36 2 Reforestation, avoided deforestation and LULUCF 00:12:44 3 Enhanced photosynthesis 00:14:38 4 Biochar 00:16:20 5 Improved agricultural and farming practices 00:18:57 6 Biosequestration and climate change policy 00:23:19 7 Philosophical basis of biosequestration 00:24:10 8 Barriers to increased global biosequestration 00:29:02 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7692573494682841 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biosequestration is the capture and storage of the atmospheric greenhouse gas carbon dioxide by biological processes. This may be by increased photosynthesis (through practices such as reforestation / preventing deforestation and genetic engineering); by enhanced soil carbon trapping in agriculture; or by the use of algal bio sequestration (see algae bioreactor) to absorb the carbon dioxide emissions from coal, petroleum (oil) or natural gas-fired electricity generation. Biosequestration as a natural process has occurred in the past, and was responsible for the formation of the extensive coal and oil deposits which are now being burned. It is a key policy concept in the climate change mitigation debate. It does not generally refer to the sequestering of carbon dioxide in oceans (see carbon sequestration and ocean acidification) or rock formations, depleted oil or gas reservoirs (see oil depletion and peak oil), deep saline aquifers, or deep coal seams (see coal mining) (for all see geosequestration) or through the use of industrial chemical carbon dioxide scrubbing.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
The Checkout - Season 1 Episode 2
 
29:07
(2013-03-28) Julian Morrow and Craig Reucassel from The Chaser team tackle consumer affairs in a way that would have Helen Wellings turning in her grave, if she was dead.
Views: 50035 The Chaser Archive
Flat Earth - Have You Seen The D-Tore Flights Around The World
 
01:00:25
SUBSCRIBE - https://goo.gl/cg5vAK ------------------- SUBSCRIBE - https://goo.gl/cg5vAK Watch more FLAT EARTH videos in the following playlists: * Biblical Flat Earth - https://goo.gl/UqptKK * Flat Earth Documentaries - https://goo.gl/uBSTV3 * The Flat Sun - https://goo.gl/TX2zkW * The Flat Moon - https://goo.gl/ZWDopw * The South Pole - https://goo.gl/YgHeBP * The Flat Earth - https://goo.gl/ERtsK8 * Mandela Effect - https://goo.gl/KHANuH * Liked Videos by "Research Flat Earth" - https://goo.gl/GPeqLw Music. Background Music - 1 hour loop. Don`t forget like this video, share and subscribe to TheRelaxingWorld channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo5RYA-DJT3ckxftIPR4wlw
Views: 346 Research Flat Earth
Copper | Wikipedia audio article
 
54:56
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper 00:02:48 1 Characteristics 00:02:58 1.1 Physical 00:05:24 1.2 Chemical 00:06:08 1.3 Isotopes 00:07:24 1.4 Occurrence 00:08:30 2 Production 00:09:36 2.1 Reserves 00:11:43 2.2 Methods 00:13:32 2.3 Recycling 00:14:46 3 Alloys 00:16:23 4 Compounds 00:16:44 4.1 Binary compounds 00:17:40 4.2 Coordination chemistry 00:20:00 4.3 Organocopper chemistry 00:21:13 4.4 Copper(III) and copper(IV) 00:22:33 5 History 00:22:51 5.1 Prehistoric history 00:23:00 5.1.1 Copper Age 00:25:16 5.1.2 Bronze Age 00:26:43 5.2 Ancient and Post-classical history 00:29:36 5.3 Modern history 00:31:37 6 Applications 00:32:32 6.1 Wire and cable 00:34:13 6.2 Electronics and related devices 00:34:51 6.3 Electric motors 00:35:46 6.4 Architecture 00:37:33 6.5 Antibiofouling applications 00:38:24 6.6 Antimicrobial applications 00:40:29 6.7 Folk medicine 00:41:05 6.7.1 Compression clothing 00:41:34 6.8 Other uses 00:41:50 7 Degradation 00:42:44 8 Biological role 00:45:16 8.1 Dietary needs 00:46:28 8.2 Dietary recommendations 00:50:32 8.3 Deficiency 00:51:38 8.4 Toxicity 00:53:03 8.5 Human exposure 00:54:08 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7821749900806967 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper is one of the few metals that can occur in nature in a directly usable metallic form (native metals). This led to very early human use in several regions, from c. 8000 BC. Thousands of years later, it was the first metal to be smelted from sulfide ores, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c. 4000 BC and the first metal to be purposefully alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, c. 3500 BC.In the Roman era, copper was principally mined on Cyprus, the origin of the name of the metal, from aes сyprium (metal of Cyprus), later corrupted to сuprum (Latin), from which the words derived, coper (Old English) and copper, first used around 1530.The commonly encountered compounds are copper(II) salts, which often impart blue or green colors to such minerals as azurite, malachite, and turquoise, and have been used widely and historically as pigments. Copper used in buildings, usually for roofing, oxidizes to form a green verdigris (or patina). Copper is sometimes used in decorative art, both in its elemental metal form and in compounds as pigments. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic agents, fungicides, and wood preservatives. Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustaceans, copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. In humans, copper is found mainly in the liver, muscle, and bone. The adult body contains between 1.4 and 2.1 mg of copper per kilogram of body weight.
Views: 10 wikipedia tts
Copper | Wikipedia audio article
 
48:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Copper Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper is one of the few metals that can occur in nature in a directly usable metallic form (native metals). This led to very early human use in several regions, from c. 8000 BC. Thousands of years later, it was the first metal to be smelted from sulfide ores, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c. 4000 BC and the first metal to be purposefully alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, c. 3500 BC.In the Roman era, copper was principally mined on Cyprus, the origin of the name of the metal, from aes сyprium (metal of Cyprus), later corrupted to сuprum (Latin), from which the words derived, coper (Old English) and copper, first used around 1530.The commonly encountered compounds are copper(II) salts, which often impart blue or green colors to such minerals as azurite, malachite, and turquoise, and have been used widely and historically as pigments. Copper used in buildings, usually for roofing, oxidizes to form a green verdigris (or patina). Copper is sometimes used in decorative art, both in its elemental metal form and in compounds as pigments. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic agents, fungicides, and wood preservatives. Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustaceans, copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. In humans, copper is found mainly in the liver, muscle, and bone. The adult body contains between 1.4 and 2.1 mg of copper per kilogram of body weight.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Climate change mitigation | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:07:45
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_change_mitigation 00:03:41 1 Greenhouse gas concentrations and stabilization 00:09:09 2 Energy consumption by power source 00:10:09 3 Methods and means 00:14:07 3.1 Demand side management 00:14:17 3.1.1 Lifestyle and behavior 00:16:50 3.1.1.1 Dietary change 00:18:38 3.1.2 Energy efficiency and conservation 00:21:44 3.1.3 Demand-side switching sources 00:25:09 3.1.4 Demand side grid management 00:27:34 3.2 Alternative energy sources 00:27:44 3.2.1 Renewable energy 00:34:48 3.2.2 Nuclear power 00:48:37 3.2.3 Coal to gas fuel switching 00:52:17 3.2.4 Heat pump 00:54:57 3.2.5 Fossil fuel phase-out: carbon neutral and negative fuels 00:55:32 3.3 Sinks and negative emissions 00:57:26 3.3.1 Reforestation and afforestation 01:00:04 3.3.2 Avoided desertification 01:02:23 3.3.3 Carbon capture and storage 01:04:19 3.3.4 Enhanced weathering 01:05:01 3.4 Geoengineering 01:07:23 3.4.1 Carbon dioxide removal 01:09:14 3.4.2 Solar radiation management 01:09:44 3.5 Non-COsub2/sub greenhouse gases 01:13:31 4 By sector 01:13:41 4.1 Transport 01:15:11 4.2 Urban planning 01:17:50 4.2.1 Building design 01:18:46 4.3 Agriculture 01:19:58 4.4 Societal controls 01:20:08 4.4.1 Population 01:22:10 5 Costs and benefits 01:22:20 5.1 Costs 01:23:08 5.2 Benefits 01:24:33 5.3 Sharing 01:24:43 5.3.1 Distributing emissions abatement costs 01:26:37 5.3.2 Specific proposals 01:27:32 6 Governmental and intergovernmental action 01:29:02 6.1 Kyoto Protocol 01:31:27 6.2 Temperature targets 01:33:29 6.3 Encouraging use changes 01:34:48 6.3.1 Emissions tax 01:35:54 6.3.2 Subsidies 01:40:47 6.3.3 Investment 01:40:57 6.3.4 Carbon emissions trading 01:42:07 6.4 Implementation 01:42:54 6.4.1 Funding 01:43:23 6.4.2 Problems 01:46:18 6.4.3 Occurrence 01:46:50 6.5 Territorial policies 01:48:11 6.5.1 United States 01:50:23 6.5.2 European Union 01:51:25 6.5.3 Developing countries 01:51:34 7 Non-governmental approaches 01:54:35 7.1 Choices in personal actions and business operations 01:55:31 7.1.1 Air travel and shipment 01:58:50 7.2 Business opportunities and risks 01:59:16 7.3 Investor response 02:00:10 7.4 Legal action 02:01:03 7.5 Activism 02:02:24 8 See also 02:03:16 8.1 By country 02:06:05 9 Notes 02:07:08 10 References 02:07:17 11 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.857823901629676 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Climate change mitigation consists of actions to limit the magnitude or rate of long-term global warming and its related effects. Climate change mitigation generally involves reductions in human (anthropogenic) emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Mitigation may also be achieved by increasing the capacity of carbon sinks, e.g., through reforestation. Mitigation policies can substantially reduce the risks associated with human-induced global warming.According to the IPCC's 2014 assessment report, "Mitigation is a public good; climate change is a case of the 'tragedy of the commons'. Effective climate change mitigation will not be achieved if each agent (individual, institution or country) acts independently in its own selfish interest (see International cooperation and Emissions trading), suggesting the need for collective action. Some adaptation actions, on the other hand, have characteristics of a private good as benefits of actions may accrue more directly to the individuals, regions, or countries that undertake them, at least in the short term. Nevertheless, financing such adaptive activities remains an issue, particularly for poor individuals and countries."Examples of mitigation include reducing energy demand by increasing energy efficiency, phasing out fossil fuels by switching to low-carbon energy sources, and removing carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere. for example, through improved building insulation. Another approach to climate change mitigation is climate engineering.M ...
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Copper | Wikipedia audio article
 
47:33
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper 00:02:22 1 Characteristics 00:02:31 1.1 Physical 00:04:38 1.2 Chemical 00:05:17 1.3 Isotopes 00:06:22 1.4 Occurrence 00:07:20 2 Production 00:08:17 2.1 Reserves 00:10:07 2.2 Methods 00:11:41 2.3 Recycling 00:12:45 3 Alloys 00:14:10 4 Compounds 00:14:29 4.1 Binary compounds 00:15:18 4.2 Coordination chemistry 00:17:19 4.3 Organocopper chemistry 00:18:23 4.4 Copper(III) and copper(IV) 00:19:32 5 History 00:19:49 5.1 Prehistoric history 00:19:58 5.1.1 Copper Age 00:21:55 5.1.2 Bronze Age 00:23:11 5.2 Ancient and Post-classical history 00:25:38 5.3 Modern history 00:27:22 6 Applications 00:28:09 6.1 Wire and cable 00:29:36 6.2 Electronics and related devices 00:30:10 6.3 Electric motors 00:30:58 6.4 Architecture 00:32:30 6.5 Antibiofouling applications 00:33:15 6.6 Antimicrobial applications 00:35:01 6.7 Folk medicine 00:35:33 6.7.1 Compression clothing 00:35:59 6.8 Other uses 00:36:13 7 Degradation 00:37:00 8 Biological role 00:39:13 8.1 Dietary needs 00:40:16 8.2 Dietary recommendations 00:43:45 8.3 Deficiency 00:44:42 8.4 Toxicity 00:45:55 8.5 Human exposure 00:46:51 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper is one of the few metals that can occur in nature in a directly usable metallic form (native metals). This led to very early human use in several regions, from c. 8000 BC. Thousands of years later, it was the first metal to be smelted from sulfide ores, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c. 4000 BC and the first metal to be purposefully alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, c. 3500 BC.In the Roman era, copper was principally mined on Cyprus, the origin of the name of the metal, from aes сyprium (metal of Cyprus), later corrupted to сuprum (Latin), from which the words derived, coper (Old English) and copper, first used around 1530.The commonly encountered compounds are copper(II) salts, which often impart blue or green colors to such minerals as azurite, malachite, and turquoise, and have been used widely and historically as pigments. Copper used in buildings, usually for roofing, oxidizes to form a green verdigris (or patina). Copper is sometimes used in decorative art, both in its elemental metal form and in compounds as pigments. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic agents, fungicides, and wood preservatives. Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustaceans, copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. In humans, copper is found mainly in the liver, muscle, and bone. The adult body contains between 1.4 and 2.1 mg of copper per kilogram of body weight.
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Environmental policy of the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
49:22
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_policy_of_the_United_States 00:02:50 1 Policy tools 00:04:21 2 Power delegation and policy jurisdiction 00:04:32 2.1 Executive branch 00:05:59 2.2 Legislative branch 00:07:19 3 History 00:07:51 3.1 Origins of the environmental movement 00:12:18 3.2 The Nixon Administration and beginning of the Environmental Decade (1970–1980) 00:15:22 3.3 The Ford Administration (1974-1977) 00:15:35 3.4 The Carter Administration (1977-1981) 00:15:47 3.5 The Reagan Administration (1981–1989) 00:18:43 3.6 The George H. W. Bush Administration (1989–1993) 00:22:17 3.7 The Clinton Administration (1993–2001) 00:24:27 3.8 The George W. Bush Administration (2001–2009) 00:24:37 3.8.1 The President’s Initiative 00:26:36 3.8.2 Global environmental policy 00:28:55 3.8.3 Campaign promise on the environment 00:29:54 3.8.4 Environmental regulation 00:30:40 3.8.5 Reducing air pollution 00:31:43 3.8.6 Bush environmental legacy 00:32:52 3.9 The Obama Administration (2009–2017) 00:33:46 3.10 The Trump Administration (2017–present) 00:36:11 4 Issues 00:36:42 4.1 Acid deposition 00:38:59 4.2 Ozone depletion 00:40:34 4.3 Hazardous wastes 00:43:20 4.4 Risk control policy 00:46:25 5 Impact 00:48:43 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7488603916911505 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The environmental policy of the United States is a federal governmental action to regulate activities that have an environmental impact in the United States. The goal of environmental policy is to protect the environment for future generations while interfering as little as possible with the efficiency of commerce or the liberty of the people and to limit inequity in who is burdened with environmental costs. As his first official act bringing in the 1970s, President Richard Nixon signed the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into law on New Years Day, 1970. Also in the same year, American starts to celebrate the first earth day, which is "the big bang of U.S. environmental politics, launching the country on a sweeping social learning curve about ecological management never before experienced or attempted in any other nation"(RosenBaum, 2016, p. 9). NEPA established a comprehensive US national environmental policy and created the requirement to prepare an environmental impact statement for “major federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the environment.” Eccleston has called NEPA, the world's “environmental Magna Carta”.As a result of the environmental movement in the United States, it continued to mature in the 1970s during which several environmental laws were passed, regulating air and water pollution and forming the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Partially due to the high costs associated with these regulations, there has been a backlash from business and politically conservative interests, limiting increases to environmental regulatory budgets and slowing efforts to protect the environment. Since the 1970s, despite frequent legislative gridlock, there have been significant achievements in environmental regulation, including increases in air and water quality and, to a lesser degree, control of hazardous waste. Due to increasing scientific consensus on global warming and political pressure from environmental groups, modifications to the United States energy policy and limits on greenhouse gas have been suggested. As established under NEPA, the US was the first nation in the world to introduce the concept of preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate the alternatives and impacts of proposed federal actions. The EIS is designed to forge federal policies, programs, projects, and plans. A large percentage of nations around the world have adopted provisions that emulate the American EIS process.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Phosphorus | Wikipedia audio article
 
53:57
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Phosphorus 00:02:06 1 Characteristics 00:02:15 1.1 Allotropes 00:07:10 1.2 Chemiluminescence 00:08:34 1.3 Isotopes 00:10:44 2 Occurrence 00:10:52 2.1 Universe 00:11:20 2.2 Crust and organic sources 00:12:57 3 Compounds 00:13:06 3.1 Phosphorus(V) 00:16:20 3.2 Phosphorus(III) 00:17:19 3.3 Phosphorus(I) and phosphorus(II) 00:17:44 3.4 Phosphides and phosphines 00:19:20 3.5 Oxoacids 00:19:57 3.6 Nitrides 00:20:54 3.7 Sulfides 00:21:28 3.8 Organophosphorus compounds 00:22:35 4 History 00:22:49 4.1 Discovery 00:23:05 4.2 Bone ash and guano 00:23:57 4.3 Phosphate rock 00:26:47 4.4 Incendiaries 00:28:07 5 Production 00:29:09 5.1 Peak phosphorus 00:31:10 5.2 Elemental phosphorus 00:32:15 6 Applications 00:33:42 6.1 Fertiliser 00:36:40 6.2 Organophosphorus 00:36:50 6.3 Metallurgical aspects 00:38:09 6.4 Matches 00:38:40 6.5 Water softening 00:39:13 6.6 Miscellaneous 00:40:27 7 Biological role 00:40:51 7.1 Bone and teeth enamel 00:42:35 7.2 Phosphorus deficiency 00:44:53 7.3 Dietary recommendations 00:45:27 7.4 Food sources 00:46:42 8 Precautions 00:49:33 8.1 US DEA List I status 00:50:01 9 Notes 00:53:13 10 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Phosphorus is a chemical element with symbol P and atomic number 15. Elemental phosphorus exists in two major forms, white phosphorus and red phosphorus, but because it is highly reactive, phosphorus is never found as a free element on Earth. It has a concentration in the Earth's crust of about one gram per kilogram (compare copper at about 0.06 grams). With few exceptions, minerals containing phosphorus are in the maximally oxidized state as inorganic phosphate rocks. Elemental phosphorus was first isolated (as white phosphorus) in 1669 and emitted a faint glow when exposed to oxygen – hence the name, taken from Greek mythology, Φωσφόρος meaning "light-bearer" (Latin Lucifer), referring to the "Morning Star", the planet Venus. The term "phosphorescence", meaning glow after illumination, derives from this property of phosphorus, although the word has since been used for a different physical process that produces a glow. The glow of phosphorus is caused by oxidation of the white (but not red) phosphorus — a process now called chemiluminescence. Together with nitrogen, arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, phosphorus is classified as a pnictogen. Phosphorus is essential for life. Phosphates (compounds containing the phosphate ion, PO43−) are a component of DNA, RNA, ATP, and phospholipids. Elemental phosphorus was first isolated from human urine, and bone ash was an important early phosphate source. Phosphate mines contain fossils because phosphate is present in the fossilized deposits of animal remains and excreta. Low phosphate levels are an important limit to growth in some aquatic systems. The vast majority of phosphorus compounds mined are consumed as fertilisers. Phosphate is needed to replace the phosphorus that plants remove from the soil, and its annual demand is rising nearly twice as fast as the growth of the human population. Other applications include organophosphorus compounds in detergents, pesticides, and nerve agents.
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
Mitigation of global warming | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:33:04
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_change_mitigation 00:02:39 1 Greenhouse gas concentrations and stabilization 00:06:31 2 Energy consumption by power source 00:07:17 3 Methods and means 00:10:09 3.1 Demand side management 00:10:17 3.1.1 Lifestyle and behavior 00:12:08 3.1.1.1 Dietary change 00:13:27 3.1.2 Energy efficiency and conservation 00:15:44 3.1.3 Demand-side switching sources 00:18:14 3.1.4 Demand side grid management 00:19:59 3.2 Alternative energy sources 00:20:08 3.2.1 Renewable energy 00:25:14 3.2.2 Nuclear power 00:35:03 3.2.3 Coal to gas fuel switching 00:37:43 3.2.4 Heat pump 00:39:38 3.2.5 Fossil fuel phase-out: carbon neutral and negative fuels 00:40:04 3.3 Sinks and negative emissions 00:41:28 3.3.1 Reforestation and afforestation 00:43:22 3.3.2 Avoided desertification 00:45:04 3.3.3 Carbon capture and storage 00:46:28 3.3.4 Enhanced weathering 00:47:00 3.4 Geoengineering 00:48:43 3.4.1 Carbon dioxide removal 00:50:04 3.4.2 Solar radiation management 00:50:27 3.5 Non-COsub2/sub greenhouse gases 00:53:13 4 By sector 00:53:21 4.1 Transport 00:54:26 4.2 Urban planning 00:56:22 4.2.1 Building design 00:57:03 4.3 Agriculture 00:57:54 4.4 Societal controls 00:58:02 4.4.1 Population 00:59:28 5 Costs and benefits 00:59:38 5.1 Costs 01:00:12 5.2 Benefits 01:01:16 5.3 Sharing 01:01:25 5.3.1 Distributing emissions abatement costs 01:02:46 5.3.2 Specific proposals 01:03:28 6 Governmental and intergovernmental action 01:04:33 6.1 Kyoto Protocol 01:06:18 6.2 Temperature targets 01:07:46 6.3 Encouraging use changes 01:08:45 6.3.1 Emissions tax 01:09:35 6.3.2 Subsidies 01:13:04 6.3.3 Investment 01:13:12 6.3.4 Carbon emissions trading 01:14:04 6.4 Implementation 01:14:40 6.4.1 Funding 01:15:02 6.4.2 Problems 01:17:11 6.4.3 Occurrence 01:17:35 6.5 Territorial policies 01:18:36 6.5.1 United States 01:20:11 6.5.2 European Union 01:20:58 6.5.3 Developing countries 01:21:07 7 Non-governmental approaches 01:23:19 7.1 Choices in personal actions and business operations 01:24:00 7.1.1 Air travel and shipment 01:26:25 7.2 Business opportunities and risks 01:26:45 7.3 Investor response 01:27:26 7.4 Legal action 01:28:06 7.5 Activism 01:29:06 8 See also 01:29:44 8.1 By country 01:31:46 9 Notes 01:32:33 10 References 01:32:41 11 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9627404178958932 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Climate change mitigation consists of actions to limit the magnitude or rate of long-term global warming and its related effects. Climate change mitigation generally involves reductions in human (anthropogenic) emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Mitigation may also be achieved by increasing the capacity of carbon sinks, e.g., through reforestation. Mitigation policies can substantially reduce the risks associated with human-induced global warming.According to the IPCC's 2014 assessment report, "Mitigation is a public good; climate change is a case of the 'tragedy of the commons'. Effective climate change mitigation will not be achieved if each agent (individual, institution or country) acts independently in its own selfish interest (see International cooperation and Emissions trading), suggesting the need for collective action. Some adaptation actions, on the other hand, have characteristics of a private good as benefits of actions may accrue more directly to the individuals, regions, or countries that undertake them, at least in the short term. Nevertheless, financing such adaptive activities remains an issue, particularly for poor individuals and countries."Examples of mitigation include reducing energy demand by increasing energy efficiency, phasing out fossil fuels by switching to low-carbon energy sources, and removing carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere. for example, through improved building insulation. Another approach to climate change mitigation is climate engineering. ...
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Phosphorus | Wikipedia audio article
 
54:01
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Phosphorus 00:02:06 1 Characteristics 00:02:15 1.1 Allotropes 00:07:11 1.2 Chemiluminescence 00:08:35 1.3 Isotopes 00:10:45 2 Occurrence 00:10:53 2.1 Universe 00:11:21 2.2 Crust and organic sources 00:12:58 3 Compounds 00:13:07 3.1 Phosphorus(V) 00:16:21 3.2 Phosphorus(III) 00:17:20 3.3 Phosphorus(I) and phosphorus(II) 00:17:45 3.4 Phosphides and phosphines 00:19:21 3.5 Oxoacids 00:19:58 3.6 Nitrides 00:20:55 3.7 Sulfides 00:21:29 3.8 Organophosphorus compounds 00:22:36 4 History 00:22:50 4.1 Discovery 00:23:06 4.2 Bone ash and guano 00:23:57 4.3 Phosphate rock 00:26:48 4.4 Incendiaries 00:28:07 5 Production 00:29:09 5.1 Peak phosphorus 00:31:11 5.2 Elemental phosphorus 00:32:16 6 Applications 00:33:43 6.1 Fertiliser 00:36:42 6.2 Organophosphorus 00:36:51 6.3 Metallurgical aspects 00:38:11 6.4 Matches 00:38:42 6.5 Water softening 00:39:15 6.6 Miscellaneous 00:40:29 7 Biological role 00:40:53 7.1 Bone and teeth enamel 00:42:37 7.2 Phosphorus deficiency 00:44:55 7.3 Dietary recommendations 00:45:30 7.4 Food sources 00:46:45 8 Precautions 00:49:36 8.1 US DEA List I status 00:50:04 9 Notes 00:53:16 10 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Phosphorus is a chemical element with symbol P and atomic number 15. Elemental phosphorus exists in two major forms, white phosphorus and red phosphorus, but because it is highly reactive, phosphorus is never found as a free element on Earth. It has a concentration in the Earth's crust of about one gram per kilogram (compare copper at about 0.06 grams). With few exceptions, minerals containing phosphorus are in the maximally oxidized state as inorganic phosphate rocks. Elemental phosphorus was first isolated (as white phosphorus) in 1669 and emitted a faint glow when exposed to oxygen – hence the name, taken from Greek mythology, Φωσφόρος meaning "light-bearer" (Latin Lucifer), referring to the "Morning Star", the planet Venus. The term "phosphorescence", meaning glow after illumination, derives from this property of phosphorus, although the word has since been used for a different physical process that produces a glow. The glow of phosphorus is caused by oxidation of the white (but not red) phosphorus — a process now called chemiluminescence. Together with nitrogen, arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, phosphorus is classified as a pnictogen. Phosphorus is essential for life. Phosphates (compounds containing the phosphate ion, PO43−) are a component of DNA, RNA, ATP, and phospholipids. Elemental phosphorus was first isolated from human urine, and bone ash was an important early phosphate source. Phosphate mines contain fossils because phosphate is present in the fossilized deposits of animal remains and excreta. Low phosphate levels are an important limit to growth in some aquatic systems. The vast majority of phosphorus compounds mined are consumed as fertilisers. Phosphate is needed to replace the phosphorus that plants remove from the soil, and its annual demand is rising nearly twice as fast as the growth of the human population. Other applications include organophosphorus compounds in detergents, pesticides, and nerve agents.
Views: 34 wikipedia tts
Boron | Wikipedia audio article
 
48:20
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Boron 00:02:40 1 History 00:04:44 2 Preparation of elemental boron in the laboratory 00:05:33 3 Characteristics 00:05:42 3.1 Allotropes 00:07:24 3.2 Chemistry of the element 00:08:37 3.2.1 Chemical compounds 00:12:50 3.2.1.1 Organoboron chemistry 00:14:11 3.2.1.2 Compounds of B(I) and B(II) 00:16:11 3.3 Isotopes 00:18:00 3.3.1 Commercial isotope enrichment 00:18:32 3.3.2 Enriched boron (boron-10) 00:20:37 3.3.3 Depleted boron (boron-11) 00:20:47 3.3.3.1 Radiation-hardened semiconductors 00:21:39 3.3.3.2 Proton-boron fusion 00:22:22 3.3.4 NMR spectroscopy 00:22:57 3.4 Occurrence 00:24:17 4 Production 00:25:47 4.1 Market trend 00:28:29 5 Applications 00:29:35 5.1 Elemental boron fiber 00:30:33 5.2 Boronated fiberglass 00:32:08 5.3 Borosilicate glass 00:32:46 5.4 Boron carbide ceramic 00:34:21 5.5 High-hardness and abrasive compounds 00:35:09 5.6 Boron metal coatings 00:36:21 5.7 Detergent formulations and bleaching agents 00:37:04 5.8 Insecticides 00:37:20 5.9 Semiconductors 00:38:32 5.10 Magnets 00:39:22 5.11 Shielding and neutron absorber in nuclear reactors 00:39:55 5.12 Other nonmedical uses 00:41:22 5.13 Pharmaceutical and biological applications 00:42:53 5.14 Research areas 00:43:38 6 Biological role 00:45:54 6.1 Analytical quantification 00:46:21 6.2 Health issues and toxicity Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Boron is a chemical element with symbol B and atomic number 5. Produced entirely by cosmic ray spallation and supernovae and not by stellar nucleosynthesis, it is a low-abundance element in the Solar system and in the Earth's crust. Boron is concentrated on Earth by the water-solubility of its more common naturally occurring compounds, the borate minerals. These are mined industrially as evaporites, such as borax and kernite. The largest known boron deposits are in Turkey, the largest producer of boron minerals. Elemental boron is a metalloid that is found in small amounts in meteoroids but chemically uncombined boron is not otherwise found naturally on Earth. Industrially, very pure boron is produced with difficulty because of refractory contamination by carbon or other elements. Several allotropes of boron exist: amorphous boron is a brown powder; crystalline boron is silvery to black, extremely hard (about 9.5 on the Mohs scale), and a poor electrical conductor at room temperature. The primary use of elemental boron is as boron filaments with applications similar to carbon fibers in some high-strength materials. Boron is primarily used in chemical compounds. About half of all boron consumed globally is an additive in fiberglass for insulation and structural materials. The next leading use is in polymers and ceramics in high-strength, lightweight structural and refractory materials. Borosilicate glass is desired for its greater strength and thermal shock resistance than ordinary soda lime glass. Boron as sodium perborate is used as a bleach. A small amount of boron is used as a dopant in semiconductors, and reagent intermediates in the synthesis of organic fine chemicals. A few boron-containing organic pharmaceuticals are used or are in study. Natural boron is composed of two stable isotopes, one of which (boron-10) has a number of uses as a neutron-capturing agent. In biology, borates have low toxicity in mammals (similar to table salt), but are more toxic to arthropods and are used as insecticides. Boric acid is mildly antimicrobial, and several natural boron-containing organic antibiotics are known. Boron is an essential plant nutrient and boron compounds such as borax and boric acid are used as fertilizers in agriculture, although it only required in small amounts, with excess being toxic. Boron compounds play a strengthening role in the cell walls of all plants. There is no consensus on whether boron is an essential nutrient for mammals, including humans, although there is some evidence it supports bone health.
Views: 58 wikipedia tts
History of Newfoundland and Labrador | Wikipedia audio article
 
55:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of Newfoundland and Labrador Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The first brief European contact with Newfoundland and Labrador came about 1000 AD when the Vikings briefly settled in L'Anse aux Meadows. Around 1500, European explorers and fishermen from England, Portugal, Netherlands, France, and Spain (mainly Basques) began exploration. Fishing expeditions came seasonally; the first small permanent settlements appeared around 1630. Catholic-Protestant religious tensions were high but mellowed after 1860. The British colony voted against joining Canada in 1869 and became an independent dominion in the early 20th century. Fishing was always the dominant industry, but the economy collapsed in the Great Depression of the 1930s and the people voluntarily relinquished their independence to become a British colony again. Prosperity and self-confidence returned during the Second World War, and after intense debate the people voted to join Canada in 1949. Poverty and emigration have remained significant themes in Newfoundland history, despite efforts to modernize after 1949. Most efforts failed, and the sudden collapse of the cod fishing industry was a terrific blow in the 1990s. The oil boom in the '00's has revived the economy, but the benefits are not distributed evenly. Over the second half of the 20th century, the historic cultural and political tensions between British Protestants and Irish Catholics faded, and a new spirit of a unified Newfoundland identity has recently emerged through songs and popular culture.
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
National Energy Program | Wikipedia audio article
 
44:43
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Energy_Program 00:00:24 1 Background 00:02:10 1.1 Global context 00:07:44 1.2 Canadian context 00:10:48 1.2.1 National Energy Board 00:13:35 1.2.2 Price controls 00:16:04 2 Petro-Canada 00:17:04 3 NEP goals 00:19:09 3.1 Program details 00:22:28 4 Global economic recession in the 1980s 00:23:01 5 Reaction in Alberta 00:28:14 6 Canada and the global recession in the 1980s 00:29:21 6.1 North American housing prices 00:30:37 7 Price of oil 00:31:26 8 Bankruptcies 00:34:40 8.1 Alberta GDP 00:35:37 8.2 Provincial per capita federal contributions 00:37:59 9 Norway compared to Alberta 00:39:52 10 Western alienation in Canada 00:42:32 11 End of the NEP 00:44:29 12 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7760670495991182 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The National Energy Program (NEP) was an energy policy of the Government of Canada from 1980 to 1985. It was created under the Liberal government of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau by Minister of Energy Marc Lalonde in 1980, and administered by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources.
Views: 12 wikipedia tts