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Differentiating Muscle Tissues
 
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A short lesson on how to tell the three types of muscle tissue from one another based on their histological appearance.
Views: 64667 ProfessorBrownETSU
ANATOMY; VISCERAL SMOOTH MUSCLE & CARDIAC MUSCLE HISTOLOGY by Professor Fink
 
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In this Video-Lecture Professor Fink describes the Histology (Microanatomy) of Visceral Smooth Muscle and Cardiac Muscle, while comparing and contrasting them with the Histology of Skeletal Muscle Tissue. Reference is also made to intercalated discs (gap junctions), peristaltic contractions, autonomic motorneurons, vasoconstriction, bronchoconstriction, Iris of the Eye, and arrector pili muscles. Check-out professor fink's web-site or additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: www.professorfink.com Down-loadable e-Books of the Lecture Outlines by Professor Fink can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: https://wlac.redshelf.com/ “Hard Copy” Lecture Outlines can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: http://onlinestore.wlac.edu/fink.asp
Views: 15456 professorfink
Muscular Tissues Part 3
 
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This lecture examines the general characteristics of cardiac and smooth muscle cells. Arcadia University BI327 Histology
Views: 480 John R. Hoffman
Three types of muscle | Circulatory system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Understanding the structure of a muscle cell. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/heart-muscle-contraction-ddp/v/heart-cells-up-close?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/heart-muscle-contraction-ddp/v/tropomyosin-and-troponin-and-their-role-in-regulating-muscle-contraction?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 455934 khanacademymedicine
Cardiovascular System multiple choice questions
 
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Test you basic knowledge of the cardiovascular system with these multiple choice questions. Lots of background explanations and additional information is discussed. MCQ Questions on the Cardiovascular System. Download e copies of my text books from campbellteaching.co.uk 1. Which of the following blood vessels contains deoxygenated blood? a. pulmonary vein b. pulmonary artery c. aorta d. carotid artery 2. The coronary arteries supply blood to the; a. left side of the body b. right atrium c. left atrium d. myocardium 3. The site of gaseous exchange between the blood and tissues is the; a. arterioles b. venules c. systemic capillaries d. pulmonary capillaries e. lungs 4. The electrical activity for the contraction of the heart is initiated by the; a. sinoatrial node b. atrioventircular node c. medulla oblongata d. myocytes e. motor cortex in the brain 5. The function of the mitral valve is to prevent reflux of blood from the; a. right ventricle into the right atrium b. right atrium into the right ventricle c. left ventricle into the left atrium d. left atrium into the left ventricle 6. The endocardium is composed of a. tough fibrous tissue b. cardiac muscle c. smooth, squamous endothelial cells d. ciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells 7. An artery can be defined as a blood vessel which carries; a. oxygenated blood b. deoxygenated blood c. blood towards the heart d. away from the heart 8. A vein can be defined as a blood vessel which carries; a. oxygenated blood b. deoxygenated blood c. blood towards the heart d. away from the heart 9. Which layer of the heart is composed of tough fibrous tissue? a. the endocardium b. the myocardium c. the epicardium d. the pericardium 10. Which layer of the heart is composed of cardiac mucscle? a. the endocardium b. the myocardium c. the epicardium d. the pericardium 11. Which layer of the heart is composed of squamous endothelium? a. the endocardium b. the myocardium c. the epicardium d. the pericardium 12. Which chamber of the heart pumps blood into the pulmonary artery? a. the left atrium b. the right atrium c. the left ventricle d. the right ventricle 13. Which chamber of the heart pumps blood into the systemic circulation? a. the left atrium b. the right atrium c. the left ventricle d. the right ventricle 14. Which chamber of the heart receives blood from the inferior and superior vena cava? a. the left atrium b. the right atrium c. the left ventricle d. the right ventricle 15. Which chamber of the heart receives blood from the pulmonary circulation? a. the left atrium b. the right atrium c. the left ventricle d. the right ventricle 16. The normal sinus rhythm is electrically generated by; a. the sinoatrial node b. the atrioventricular node c. the atrioventricular bundle d. the Purkinje fibres 17. A normal sinus ECG trace always has; a. a P wave after the QRS complex b. a P wave before the QRS complex c. a 0.3 second gap between the P wave and the QRS complex d. a 0.05 second gap after the T wave before the next P wave 18. Which of the following statements is true of a systemic capillary? a. tissue fluid is formed at the venous end of the capillary b. tissue fluid is formed at the arterial end of the capillary c. tissue fluid is formed equally all along the length of a capillary d. no tissue fluid is formed from systemic capillaries 19. Which of the following statements is true about lymphatic capillaries? a. they drain directly into systemic blood capillaries b. they receive blood from systemic blood capillaries c. they receive lymphatic fluid from larger lymphatic vessels d. they are blind ended and drain lymphatic fluid from the tissues 20. The average volume of whole blood is a 70Kg adult will be about a. 3 litres b. 5 litres c. 7 litres d. 9 litres 21. In which of the following vessels will blood pressure be the highest? a. the pulmonary artery b. the aorta c. the pulmonary veins d. the inferior vena cava
Views: 4507 Dr. John Campbell
STRUCTURE OF SKELETAL MUSCLE
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, +91- 9100061777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Types of Movement:Structure of Skeletal Muscle: Each skeletal muscle is made of a number of muscle bundles or fascicles held together by a common collagenous connective tissue layer called fascia. Each muscle bundle consists of a number of muscle fibres. Each muscle fibre is lined by the plasma membrane called sarcolemma enclosing the sarcoplasm. Muscle fibre is a syncitium as the sarcoplasm contains many nuclei and mitochondria. The endoplasmic reticulum i.e. sarcoplasmic reticulum of the muscle fibre is the store house of calcium ions.A characteristic feature of the muscle fibre is the presence of large number of parallely arranged filaments in the sarcoplasm called myofilaments or myofibrils. The myofibrils are stacked in compartments called sarcomeres. Each myofibril has alternate dark and light bands on it. The study of myofibril revealed that the striated appearance is due to the distribution pattern of two proteins -- Actin and Myosin. Both are contractile proteins. The light band contains actin and is called 'i' band or isotropic band, whereas the dark band is called 'A' band or Anisotropic band and it contains myosin. Both the proteins are arranged as rod like structures, parallel to each other and also, to the longitudinal axis of the myofibrils. Actin filaments are thinner as compared to the myosin filaments, hence are commonly called thin and thick filaments. In the centre of each 'i' band is an elastic fibre called 'Z' line which bisects it. The thin filaments are firmly attached to the Z line. The thick filaments in the A -- band are also held together in the middle of this band by a thin fibrous membrane called M - line. The A and i bands are arranged alternately throughout the length of the myofibrils. The portion of the myofibril between 2 successive 'Z' lines is considered as functional unit of contraction and is called a sacromere. In the resting state, the edges of thin filaments on either side of the thick filaments partially overlap the free ends of the thick filaments leaving the central part of the thick filament. The central part of thick filament, not overlapped by thin filaments is called the 'H' zone.
Views: 222269 7activestudio
Anatomy and Physiology Help: Chapter 10 Muscle Tissue
 
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The Muscular System
Views: 274443 AnatomyGMC
(5) COSMETOLOGY:TEST ANATOMY: 85 Questions
 
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QUESTION 72 IS C: MENTAL NERVE EFFECTS THE CHIN http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbtj1K8SwGM&list=PLCE5C71FF3E4C8657&index=4&feature=plpp_video LINK FOR THE ANATOMY THEORY The test answers at the end. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCE5C71FF3E4C8657&feature=view_all (THE PLAYLIST LINK) The test helps learn and practice to pass the state board of cosmetology written test and get licenses for cosmetology, esthetician, manicurist and barbering. For the written test, state board requires the knowledge of Anatomy and Physiology: Skeletal System, Muscular System, and Circulatory System. This video includes test questions for: Anatomy, Physiology, Histology Cells: nucleus, protoplasm, cytoplasm, cell membrane, centrosome: cell reproduction, conditions, cell metabolism: anabolism and catabolism, and the balance of homeostasis; cell reproduction: mitosis and amitosis, and conditions for reproduction Tissue types: muscular tissue, connective tissue, epithelial tissue, liquid tissue Organs and their functions; brain, eyes, liver, lungs, kidneys, skin, stomach and intestines, and reproductive organs (listed only) Systems: circulatory, muscular, nervous (in detail) Skeletal System: the skull: cranium: occipital bone, parietal bones, frontal bone, temporal bones; facial bones: lacrimal bones (2), nasal bones (2), zygomatic bones, also called molar (cheek) bones, maxillae, mandible (the jaw bone). Bones of the neck: cervical vertebrae, hyoid: Adam's Apple; bones of the chest: clavicle, scapula, thorax, ribs, sternum. Bones of the arm and hands: humerus, ulna, radius, carpus, metacarpus, Phalanges. Anatomy of leg and foot: femur, tibia, fibula, patella, talus, ankle joint. Mology; muscular system: types of muscles: striated - voluntary, non-striated -- involuntary, cardiac --heart muscle. The 3 parts of the muscle: origin, belly, and insertion; massage from insertion to origin. Muscle of the scalp- occipitofrontalis. Platysma, sternocleidomastoideus muscle. Circulatory system; blood vascular system, lymph vascular system, lymph glands and the heart; chambers and valves of the heart: right and left atrium, right and left ventricles, valves, atria; blood circulation; pulmonary circulation, systemic or general circulation, red blood cells -- red corpuscles - erythrocytes, white blood cells -- white corpuscles -- leucocytes, platelets, plasma. Arteries of neck, face and hand. Neurology: study of nerves. Nervous system; cerebrospinal nervous system, peripheral nervous system, Autonomic Nervous System;The 3 types of nerves are sensory-afferent, motor- efferent, and mixed nerves; Nerves of face, neck and hands, including fifth cranial nerve branches, seventh cranial nerve branch. This video is a test practice for cosmetology Anatomy and Physiology for cosmetology students, beauty school students, esthetician students, students of out of state, cosmetology instructional material for teachers and estheticians; manicuring instructors, barbering instructors, skin care instructors and barbering school instructors. Video by BeautyHealthtravel Channel
Views: 106955 BeautyHealthTravel
Anatomy of a muscle cell
 
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Understanding the structure of a muscle cell More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=uY2ZOsCnXIA
Views: 566396 Khan Academy
Tissues, Part 1: Crash Course A&P #2
 
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•••SUBBABLE MESSAGE••• TO: Jordan Schoonover FROM: Mom, Dad & Madison Happy Birthday Jordan! We love you sweetheart!! *** You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. *** In this episode of Crash Course Anatomy & Physiology, Hank gives you a brief history of histology and introduces you to the different types and functions of your body's tissues. -- Table of Contents: Nervous, Muscle, Epithelial & Connective Tissues 1:23 History of Histology 2:07 Nervous Tissue Forms the Nervous System 5:17 Muscle Tissue Facilitates All Your Movements 7:00 Identifying Samples 9:03 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2574462 CrashCourse
Skeletal Muscle Structure
 
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To purchase this DVD please visit http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program Muscular, Skeletal, and Integumentary Systems: Defining Our Form DVD Description Begins by introducing the dermis and epidermis of the skin; the sweat and sebaceous glands; and the skins role in protecting against microbial invasion, ultra-violet radiation and in producing vitamin D. The program then looks in-depth at the structure and function of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle before looking at the structure of cartilage and bone and the skeletal systems role in protecting vital organs, producing blood cells, storing nutrients and in conjunction with the muscular system, producing movement.
Views: 429748 greatpacificmedia
Anatomy & Physiology Chapter 9 Part A Lecture : Muscles and Muscle Tissue
 
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Anatomy & Physiology Chapter 9 Part A: Muscles and Muscle Tissue Lecture Please leave questions in the comments below or email directly at . We're kicking off our exploration of muscles with a look at the complex and important relationship between actin and myosin. Your smooth, cardiac, and skeletal . For use at PRCC-FCC. Anatomy & Physiology Chapter 9 Part B: Muscles and Muscle Tissue Lecture Please leave questions in the comments below or email directly at .
Views: 145 Doris Vasquez
Anatomy Of The Soleus Muscle - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the soleus muscle. The soleus is a muscle located beneath the gastrocnemius muscle in the superficial posterior compartment of the lower leg. Four compartments in the leg: 1-Anterior compartment 2-Lateral compartment 3-Deep posterior compartment 4-Superficial posterior compartment. Origin: the origin of the soleus muscle comes from the upper 1/3 on the back of the tibia, from the middle 1/3 of the medial border of the tibial shaft. It also arises from thee back of the head of the fibula and the upper 1/3 posterior surface of the fibular shaft and the fibrous arch that lies between the tibia and fibula. Insertion: the soleus muscle then unites with the gastrocnemius to form the Achilles tendon which inserts into the back of the calcaneus. Innervation: the soleus muscle is innervated by the tibial nerve. The tibial nerve passes behind the muscle through the fibrous arch of the soleus. Function: the soleus muscle is a plantar flexor of the ankle. The Achilles tendon is an extension of the calf muscles. Clinical situations: 1-Compartment syndrome of the leg and soleus muscle: in compartment syndrome, the pressure increases. It affects the microcirculation of the leg. If compartment syndrome is not urgently treated by fasciotomy, it may cause tissue ischemia and death. •Posteromedial incision is placed 2 cm posterior to the posterior margin of the tibia. •Opening of the superficial posterior muscle compartment. •Opening of the deep posterior muscle compartment. The soleus muscle may hide the deep posterior compartment. On the medial side, take down soleus insertion to access the deep posterior compartment. The Achilles tendon inserts into the calcaneus. 2-Achilles tendonitis: irritation and inflammation due to overuse. Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. 3-Bursitis of the retrocalcaneal bursa: retrocalcaneal bursitis is a common cause of ankle pain in athletes. Retrocalcaneal bursitis is inflammation of the bursa located between the calcaneus and the anterior surface of the Achilles tendon. 4-Achilles tendon rupture: rupture of the Achilles tendon may occur above the calcaneal insertion of the tendon. The watershed zone is the part of the tendon that has the worst blood supply. The watershed zone is a very narrow area in width between 2-6 cm proximal to the calcaneus and is prone to rupture. The Achilles tendon is prone to tendonitis or tendon ruptures within this watershed zone due to limited blood supply. Thompson test: when the examiner squeezes the calf muscle, there should be motion of the foot, which is a sign of an intact Achilles tendon. With complete tear of the Achilles tendon, there will be no movement of the ankle when performing the Thompson test. The tendon is noticeably intact in the normal ankle compared to the ankle that has a rupture of the Achilles tendon. 5-Gastrocnemius tightness vs. Achilles tightness: dorsiflexion of the ankle is limited with tightness of the gastrocnemius muscle. The gastrocnemius muscle spans across the knee joint. The gastrocnemius muscle relaxes with flexion of the knee and this improves the ankle dorsiflexion. This knee flexion test measures the range of ankle dorsiflexion with the knee flexed and the knee straight. More ankle dorsiflexion with the knee flexed indicates gastrocnemius tightness. With Achilles tendon tightness or contracture, ankle dorsiflexion is the same with knee extension and flexion. The degree of dorsiflexion does not change regardless of the knee position involving tightness of the Achilles tendon. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29 Background music provided as a free download from YouTube Audio Library. Song Title: Every Step
Views: 66801 nabil ebraheim
Cardiovascular System In Under 10 Minutes
 
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See more @ http://cteskills.com The cardiovascular system, also known as the circulatory system, is the transportation system of the body. The major structures that make this possible are the heart, blood vessels and blood. Simply put, the heart pumps the blood in order to move nutrients through the blood vessels to nourish and to remove metabolic wastes from the body. The purpose of this video is to present a basic understanding of the Cardiovascular System. A more in depth study of the system will be presented in other CTE videos where we will look into each specific structure and function of the Cardiovascular system. A, The pulmonary pathway B. The Systemic pathway Two Atria - which are the upper chambers. Two ventricles - these are the lower chambers The left and right side of the heart is divided by the SEPTUM Blood Vessels The word vessel has many meanings but in Anatomy and Physiology, Blood Vessels are meant for carrying or transporting the blood throughout the body. Arterioles are smaller blood vessels that branch out from larger arteries and lead to the (arterial) capillaries, which are the smallest blood vessels in the body… The arterial capillaries are connected to the venous capillaries…The arterial side of the capillaries is dropping off Oxygen and Nutrients TO the body’s cells The venous side of the capillaries is picking up metabolic waste FROM the body’s cells together they form a network, where arteries and veins connect completing the (closed) circulatory circuit, ….the blood flow from the venous capillaries will flow back from the body TO the heart through venous blood vessels. Similar to the arteries, only in reverse, the blood flows from the venous capillaries into a system of veins called the VENULES . These venules connect to larger veins which carry the blood back FROM the Body TO the heart, VIA the largest veins known as the Superior and Inferior Vena Cavas... The first type of blood cell is called Erythrocyte. known as the red blood cell. 2. the second type of blood cell is the Leukocyte.. known as the white blood cell 3....and the third type of cell is the thrombocytes, also known as the platelet The SA node, known as the pacemaker, is located in the right atria. It starts the spark and passes it on to the next relay station. The AV node which is located on the back wall of the heart between the right atria and the right ventricle. The spark is then passed unto the...next relay station… the ... Bundle of HIS located in the heart’s septum...and then lastly to the purjinke fibers, the relay station which spreads the electrical charge throughout the myocardium, which is the cardiac muscle, and causes the heart to contract; atrias first then the ventricles... After watching this video, you should now have a basic understanding of what the Cardiovascular System is, the basic functions, and the basic structures that define the HEART. Here’s a quick recap. The Cardiovascular or Circulatory System is an organ system whose basic purpose is to circulate blood to and from cells in the body in order to transport nutrients and remove waste. The heart pumps the blood TO the body through arteries which branch off into smaller blood vessels called arterioles. The Network of capillaries is where oxygen and other nutrients diffuse from the blood and into the cells. As O2 and nutrients are diffused into the cells from the arterial capillaries, metabolic waste is diffused into the venous capillaries from the cells...the blood returns to the heart via the veins where the cycle begins again. And remember that the heart has a beat of its own, through the electro/chemical circuit system and its 4 relay stations To sum it all up, the heart pumps blood to the BODY through the arteries and returns FROM the Body to the heart through the veins. Unfortunately, The heart is also subject to diseases and conditions … in fact the number one reason for an early demise is still due to heart failure.. These conditions will be discussed further in future CTE videos. Cardiovascular, System, circulatory, heart, blood, vessels, veins, arteries, artery, vein, oxygen, pulmonary, systemic, atria, ventricle, septum, endocardium, myocardium, pericardium, aorta, arterioles, capillaries, venules, oxygen, superior, inferior, vena, cava, erythrocyte, leukocyte, thrombocyte, red blood cell, white blood cell, platelet, sa node, av node, Bundle of HIS, Purjinke, fibres,
Views: 1108158 CTE Skills.com
Anatomy of a skeletal muscle cell | Muscular-skeletal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Understanding the structure of a skeletal muscle cell.. Created by Raja Narayan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-muscular-system/rn-the-muscular-system/v/three-types-of-muscle?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-muscular-system/rn-the-muscular-system/v/role-of-the-sarcoplasmic-reticulum-in-muscle-cells?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 176743 khanacademymedicine
The Muscular System Explained In 6 Minutes
 
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See More Videos @ http://www.cteskills.com The muscular system is made up of over 600 muscles. While we won’t be covering all 600 plus individual muscles in this overview video, we will be discussing the … - Main functions of the muscular system - 5 major properties of the muscular system - 5 types of muscle movements withing the muscular system - 3 types of muscles within the muscular system - and how all of this works together to make up the muscular system. Now there is much more to discuss about the muscular system but that’s as far as we will go in this introductory video. After watching this video you should at least have a basic understanding of what makes up the muscular system, its properties and functions. For a more in depth study of the muscular system, look for future CTE videos where we will cover topics such as the 14 major muscle groups, as well as topics such as common diseases and conditions specific to the muscular system. The primary purpose for the Muscular system is to provide movement for the body. The muscles receive their ability to move the body through the nervous system. CTE, Skills, Video, Muscular, System, Muscular System, Muscles, adduction, abduction, flexion, extension, rotation, cardiac, visceral, skeltal, voluntary, involuntary, tendons, tendon, fascia, fasciae, nervous system, abdominal, biceps, deltoid, erector, spinae, gastrocnemius, soleus, gluteus, ham strings, dorsi, obliques, pectoralis, quadriceps, trapezius, triceps,
Views: 1300570 CTE Skills.com
Layers of the heart | Human anatomy and physiology | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Take a closer look at the heart, explore some of its interesting features and get to know the three layers that make up the heart. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/human-anatomy-and-physiology/heart-introduction/v/thermoregulation-in-the-circulatory-system?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/human-anatomy-and-physiology/heart-introduction/v/lub-dub?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 583431 khanacademymedicine
Conduction System of the Heart
 
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This video describes how the electrical signal passes through the heart and causes the coordinated contraction of heart muscle. Also included is an explanation of an electrocardiogram (ECG). Sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation of the sinoatrial node and the effects of ACh and NE are also covered in this video. www.sciencewithsusanna.com has diagrams, notes, and practice questions.
Views: 153821 susannaheinze
How are muscles named? - Terminology - Human Anatomy | Kenhub
 
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Learn about the definition and terminology of the muscular system in our video tutorial. Expand your knowledge with our quiz: https://khub.me/88c45 Oh, are you struggling with learning anatomy? We created the ★ Ultimate Anatomy Study Guide ★ to help you kick some gluteus maximus in any topic. Completely free. Download yours today: https://khub.me/0ovgc In this video tutorial we will take a look at how the names of the muscles of the human body are derived. Learning and understanding the terminology and definition of anatomical terms is one of the most basic skills every student needs to acquire, so they can describe and discuss anatomical issues in lectures and courses with other students or lecturers in a precise fashion. We will take a closer look and give examples for how muscles are named after their shape, size, muscle fibre orientation, action, and more, so you will become fluent in talking about the different aspects of the muscular system. - 0:33 conventions of naming muscles after different features - 1:10 shape (e.g. deltoid, trapezius) - 2:31 size (e.g. vastus, maximus, major/minor, longus/brevis) - 4:10 muscle fibre orientation (e.g. transverse, oblique, rectus) - 5:10 action of the muscle (e.g. flexor, rotator, adductor, sphincter) - 8:26 number of origins (e.g. bi-, tri-, quadri-) - 9:04 origin and insertion (e.g. sternohyoid) - 9:27 function (e.g. risorius = laugh) - 9:45 location (e.g. tibialis anterior, supraspinatus) Want to test your knowledge on the main muscles of the upper extremity? Take this quiz: https://khub.me/fvlvx Read more on what muscles are actually made of in our free article, for a deeper understanding of one of the most important systems in our body:https://khub.me/7j5a4 For more engaging video tutorials, interactive quizzes, articles and an atlas of Human anatomy and histology, go to https://khub.me/atgh4
Exploring the Heart - The Circulatory System!
 
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Find out how the heart works, and how blood flows through your body! Learn more about your body here: http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/JustForKids/Body/Pages/default.aspx
Views: 1726925 AboutKidsHealth
Muscle Organ Structure
 
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Views: 804 Bio 241
Skeletal Muscle 2- Myofibers
 
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Part 2 in a 8 part lecture on SKELETAL MUSCLE in a flipped Human Physiology course taught by Wendy Riggs. CC-BY. Watch the whole lecture (all 8 videos) by going to the PLAYLIST: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5GRRRmaGVqUSoS1RnAiPkazRdrSWFlub
Views: 13985 Wendy Riggs
Human Heart
 
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Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://www.tutorvista.com/content/science/science-ii/transportation/heart.php Human Heart The heart is a muscular organ found in all animals with a circulatory system (including all vertebrates), that is responsible for pumping blood throughout the blood vessels by repeated, rhythmic contractions. The term cardiac (as in cardiology) means "related to the heart" and comes from the Greek kardia, for "heart." The vertebrate heart is composed of cardiac muscle, which is an involuntary striated muscle tissue found only within this organ. The average human heart, beating at 72 beats per minute, will beat approximately 2.5 billion times during an average 66 year lifespan, and weighs approximately 250 to 300 grams (9 to 11 oz) in females and 300 to 350 grams (11 to 12 oz) in males. In invertebrates that possess a circulatory system, the heart is typically a tube or small sac and pumps fluid that contains water and nutrients such as proteins, fats, and sugars. In insects, the "heart" is often called the dorsal tube and insect "blood" is almost always not oxygenated since they usually respirate (breathe) directly from their body surfaces (internal and external) to air. However, the hearts of some other arthropods (including spiders and crustaceans such as crabs and shrimp) and some other animals pump hemolymph, which contains the copper-based protein hemocyanin as an oxygen transporter similar to the iron-based hemoglobin in red blood cells found in vertebrates. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista
Views: 76749 TutorVista
Frank-Starling mechanism | Circulatory system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Carefully follow 5 different preload scenarios to see how each one will have a different effect on how actin and myosin line up. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/preload-afterload/v/sarcomere-length-tension-relationship?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/preload-afterload/v/preload-stretches-out-the-heart-cells?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 371610 khanacademymedicine
Bone Structure | Biology | Anatomy
 
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To purchase this DVD please visit http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program Muscular, Skeletal, and Integumentary Systems: Defining Our Form DVD Description Begins by introducing the dermis and epidermis of the skin; the sweat and sebaceous glands; and the skins role in protecting against microbial invasion, ultra-violet radiation and in producing vitamin D. The program then looks in-depth at the structure and function of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle before looking at the structure of cartilage and bone and the skeletal systems role in protecting vital organs, producing blood cells, storing nutrients and in conjunction with the muscular system, producing movement.
Views: 177852 greatpacificmedia
The Heart Song
 
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Here is a song I created to help my 6th grade students study. I hope you enjoy. (Pump) (Blood) (Pump) (Blood) (Pump) Let's start with atrium right (Blood) Carbon dioxide is high (Pump) Blood moves down to ventricle (Blood) Pumping this blood to the lungs (Pump) Oxygen poor blood (Blood) (Pump) (Blood) Onto the left atrium (Pump) All this blood has oxygen (Blood) Moving in right from the lungs (Pump) Down to ventricle it pumps (Blood) Aorta sends out blood (Pump) 1,2,3 Heart muscles relax filling up with blood it's in your heart Atria contract fill the ventricles contract to (Pump) (Blood) (Pump) (Blood) (Pump) Group of cells makes heart contract (Blood) Pacemakers they're called in fact (Pump) Gets info adjusting rate (Blood) Oxygen your body needs (Pump) The heart beating (Blood) (Pump) Exercise faster heartbeat (Blood) 1,2,3 Heart muscles relax filling up with blood it's in your heart Atria contract fill the ventricles contract to pump Blood, we need it now The heart's a pump So blood goes in and out Heart muscles relax filling up with blood it's in your heart Atria contract fill the ventricles contract to (Pump) (Blood) (Pump) (Blood)
Views: 1361117 ParrMr
The Skeletal System: Crash Course A&P #19
 
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Today Hank explains the skeletal system and why astronauts Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko are out in space studying it. He talks about the anatomy of the skeletal system, including the flat, short, and irregular bones, and their individual arrangements of compact and spongy bone. He'll also cover the microanatomy of bones, particularly the osteons and their inner lamella. And finally he will introduce the process of bone remodeling, which is carried out by crews of osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Table of Contents Anatomy of the Skeletal System 2:33 Flat, Short, and Irregular Bones 3:11 Arrangements of Compact and Spongy Bone 4:22 Osteons and Their Inner Lamella 5:05 Bone Remodeling 7:28 Osteocytes, Osteoblasts, and Osteoclasts 6:03 *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: Hunter Boyajian FROM: Chase Boyajian In the darkest times, hope is something you give yourself. -- TO: The World FROM: Andrew Johnstone Lets all make a podcast ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Julie Kaminski, Steven Ness, Hannah!!!!!, Pamela Genise, Mark B. Williams, Becky Kaplan, William Edwards, Rebecca Carlson, Matthew Tryba, Eric Birchfield -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 2321609 CrashCourse
Anatomy and Physiology of Muscular System
 
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Anatomy and Physiology of Muscular System human anatomy human body muscular system human skeleton muscles of the body muscle anatomy human muscles anatomy of the human body the muscular system human body for kids muscular diseases human body muscles muscular system functions diagram of the human body muscular system diseases skeleton anatomy introduction to the human body functions of the muscular system muscular system definition the muscular system anatomical chart muscular system diagram human muscular system muscular system for kids chapter 6 the muscular system the human anatomy human anatomy muscles smooth muscle cells function of the muscular system function of muscular system what is the function of the muscular system muscular system facts muscular system organs muscular system function what is the muscular system diseases of the muscular system skeletal and muscular system gross anatomy of the muscular system anatomy human human body muscle diagram human muscle chart functions of muscular system what does the muscular system do kids health igestive system muscular system quiz how does the muscular system work muscular system poster the body works parts of muscular system human anatomy bones human anatomy for kids bones of human body about human body facts about the muscular system organs in the muscular system parts of the muscular system muscular and skeletal system #Anatomy#Physiology#Muscular
Muscular tissue part 1 for NEET
 
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In this part I discussed about of types of muscles
How the heart actually pumps blood - Edmond Hui
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-the-heart-actually-pumps-blood-edmond-hui For most of history, scientists weren't quite sure why our hearts were beating or even what purpose they served. Eventually, we realized that these thumping organs serve the vital task of pumping clean blood throughout the body. But how? Edmond Hui investigates how it all works by taking a closer look at the heart's highly efficient ventricle system. Lesson by Edmond Hui, animation by Anton Bogaty.
Views: 2116796 TED-Ed
Muscles of facial expression
 
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This brief video tutorial discusses the muscles of facial expression.
Views: 51410 The Noted Anatomist
What Is The Tissue In The Body?
 
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It includes tissues that connect, support or surround other structures and organs in the body. There are four main types of tissue muscle, epithelial, connective and nervous. Fiction by jeanette winterson in granta 39 the body 11 dec 2007 all of various tissues human can be categorized into four basic tissue types. All organs are built of these four tissues, which have. Exploring four types of tissues. Microscopic epithelial tissue covers the body surface and forms lining for most internal cavities. Googleusercontent search. A basement about half of your body's weight is muscle. I checked in with some of my science colleagues to give you the cliffsnotes version an answer that cou organs contain different tissues, working together carry out particular functions. Body tissue? Definition, types & examples video what is human body study tissue definition. Muscle is found throughout the body and even includes organs such as heart. It is present in almost every this a big and interesting subject. They are formed by a combination of same cells so have connective tissue is the tough, often fibrous that binds body's structures together and provides support elasticity. Our outer layer of skin is epithelial tissue functions the cells body's surface form. Tissue in simple terms is a bunch of similar cells. Tissue biology encyclopedia cells, body, function, different the tissues, systems and cavities of body. Html url? Q webcache. A tissue is also a soft, thin piece of paper used for in the human body epithelial made cells arranged continuous sheet with one or more layers, has apical & basal surfaces. Jeanette basic tissue types siu school of medicine. Tissues and organs fundamentals merck manuals consumer tissue found in the human body? Anatomy physiology of soft canadian cancer societydefine at dictionary anatomy tissues bodylearn muscular visible body. Each is made of specialized cells that are grouped together according to structure and function. What is human body tissue definition, types examples video the 4 basic in exploring nature. Body tissue? Definition, types & examples video what is human body tissue (biology) wikipedia. The cells within a tissue share common embryonic origin. Types of soft tissue include definition, biology. Epithelial tissues help in absorption of water and nutrients the term tissue is used to describe a group cells found together body. Human body cells tissues and skin youtube. The major function of epithelial tissue includes protection, secretion, 12 jan 2013tissues are groups cells with a common structure (form) and (job). Muscle tissue is categorized into three distinct types skeletal, cardiac, and smooth a made up of group cells that usually look similar to one another come from the same region in developing embryo. An aggregate of similar cells and cell products forming a intercellular matter acting together to perform specific functions in the body tissue is part living thing that made cells, like cardiac your heart. T
Views: 9 sweet sparky
Sudden Cardiac Death In Athletes - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the sudden cardiac death in athletes. The heart is a muscular organ about the size of a closed fist that functions as the body’s circulatory pump. The heart is divided into four chambers. The upper two chambers are the Atria and the bottom two chambers are the ventricles. The interventricular septum separates the left ventricle from the right ventricle. Deoxygenated blood returning from the entire body enters the heart through the right atrium. It then passes to the right ventricle where it is pumped through the pulmonary artery to the lungs to become loaded with oxygen. Oxygenated blood returns to the left atrium and then passes down into the left ventricle where it is pumped back into the circulation through the aorta. 1-Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) It is a disease of the heart muscles that leads to abnormal thickening. This abnormal thickening of the heart muscle occurs due to an autosomal dominant genetic abnormality of the muscle cell proteins. It is the most common genetic heart malformation in athletes affecting approximately 1/500 individuals. Asymmetrical thickening of the interventricular septum may lead to a condition known as Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy (HOCM), which may lead to intermittent cardiac outflow obstruction, which may ultimately cause sudden cardiac death. Abnormal systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve leaflet exacerbated by exercise may lead to aortic obstruction and sudden death. Blood flow to the aorta is obstructed. Increased heart rate during exercise leads to decreased filling of the left ventricle with blood. This leads to a narrower left ventricular chamber that may increase the chances of aortic obstruction. Therefore HOCM is an absolute contraindication to vigorous exercise. Presentation: most patients are asymptomatic and HCM is found incidentally during regular physical examinations. Thorough history taking is one of the most important parts of the examination. Some patients may present with one or more of the following symptoms: •Dyspnea •Angina •Palpitations •Syncope •Sudden cardiac death. Investigative studies •EKG •Echocardiography 2-Commotio Cordis Sudden death of a healthy young individual with no underlying cardiac disease due to ventricular fibrillation following a blunt, nonpenetrating blow to the precordial area of the chest. Sports with high risk of commotio cordis include baseball, hockey, lacrosse, cricket, rugby, boxing, karate, and other martial arts. The chances of developing commotion cordis are influenced by the following factors: 3-Coronary artery disease Atherosclerosis: atherosclerosis may lead to sudden heart attacks and death due to blockage of a coronary artery with plaque. Plaque builds up in the arteries over time and leads to narrowing of the vessels. Risk factors: •Age •Positive family history •Smoking •Obesity •High cholesterol levels •Hypertension •Diabetes 4-Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome The normal heart is wired in such a way to prevent extra beats from occurring. Patients with WPWS have an abnormal extra electric pathway that allows the heart to beat prematurely leading to tachycardia. A heart rate exceeding 240 beat per minute may lead to sudden cardiac death. Symptoms may include chest pain, syncope, and palpitations. Continuous ambulatory EKG monitoring (Holter Monitor) can help in diagnosis. The heart rate may be controlled with medical treatment however in some cases electrical cardioversion may be required. Radiofrequency ablation may be required for long term control. 5-Myocarditis Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle that may lead to its damage, occurring due to an infection. It is usually caused by Coxsackie virus. It may also occur with Adeno or Parvo-virus. Myocarditis is believed to be responsible for up to 20% of sudden cardiac death cases. Unfortunately less that 50% of cases with myocarditis demonstrate anti-mortem symptoms. 6-Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia (ARVD) In ARVD the muscles of the right ventricle are replaced with fat and fibrous non-contractile tissue. This impedes the heart’s normal blood pumping capability. Furthermore, this condition increases the patient’s risk of developing a fatal heart arrhythmia and sudden cardiac arrest. 7-Long QT Syndrome The QT interval on an EKG represents the duration it takes for the heart to recharge after each heartbeat. A longer than normal QT interval increases risk of developing a potentially fatal arrhythmia called torsade de pointes which may cause sudden cardiac death. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29
Views: 41282 nabil ebraheim
Circulatory & Respiratory Systems - CrashCourse Biology #27
 
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Hank takes us on a trip around the body - we follow the circulatory and respiratory systems as they deliver oxygen and remove carbon dioxide from cells, and help make it possible for our bodies to function. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dft.ba/-8bCC Like CrashCourse? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow us! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Table of Contents 1) Respiratory System 00:48 2) Simple Diffusion 00:55 3) Respiratory Anatomy 02:35 a) Trachea to Capillaries 03:10 4) Lung Function & Thoracic Diaphragm 04:37 5) Circulatory System 05:35 6) Circulatory Anatomy 05:54 a) Left Ventricle to Capillary Beds 06:50 b) Veins to Left Atrium 08:46 7) Endotherms & Ectotherms 09:20 References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3cHg This video uses the following sounds from Freesound.org: "00559 deep breathing 1.wav" by Robinhood76 crash course, crashcourse, biology, animals, oxygen, carbon dioxide, cellular respiration, circulatory system, respiratory system, circulation, respiration, heart, lung, artery, vein, pulmonary, simple diffusion, membrane, lungfish, larynx, trachea, bronchus, bronchiole, alveolus, capillary, blood, inhale, exhale, diaphragm, thoracic, pressure, breathing, breath, pump, red blood cell, four chambered heart, ventricle, muscle, aorta, vena cava, atrium, endotherm, ectotherm, hank green Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1839957 CrashCourse
live tutorial walk through the medium-sized heart model anatomy practical exam review
 
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exploring the flow of blood through the heart and identifying key structures such as the ligamentum arteriosum, apex, base, auricle, left and right atrium, left and right ventricles, brachiocephalic trunk, brachiocephalic veins, pulmonary trunk, pulmonary veins, pulmonary arteries, aorta (including the ascending, descending, aortic arch, as well as the thoracic aorta and abdominal aorta, the subclavian arteries and veins, the right and left common carotid arteries, the jugular veins, the papillary muscles, the chordae tendineae, the mitral valve, also known as the bicuspid valve, the tricuspid valve, the aortic semilunar valve, the pulmonary semilunar valve, the right and left coronary arteries, the circumflex artery, the anterior interventricular artery, interventricular septum, interatrial septum, great cardiac vein, coronary sinus, as well as the muscular layers of the heart which includes the endocardium, myocardium, and the epicardium.
Views: 663 Scientist Cindy
Musculoskeletal Physical Exam: Knee
 
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Dr. Mark Stovak demonstrates how to conduct a musculoskeletal physical exam on the knee. http://www.viachristi.org/doctor/mark-l-stovak-md
Views: 166391 Ascension Via Christi
Capillaries | Biology | Anatomy
 
03:01
To purchase this DVD please visit http://www.greatpacificmedia.com/ Segment from the program Respiration and Circulation, Gas Exchange, Molecular Transport. DVD Description Our Respiration Circulation DVD looks at the flow of air through the conducting portions of the respiratory system to the alveoli before examing: the role of hemoglobin in gas exchange and O2 and CO2 transport in the blood; the operation of the respiratory control center; and the mechanics of breathing. The program then investigates the composition of blood and how it flows through the heart, arteries, capillaries and veins before looking at the role of the lymphatic system in fighting infection, transporting fats, and returning interstitial fluid to the blood.
Views: 429006 greatpacificmedia
The Living Body - Our Extraordinary Life
 
01:41:17
Subscribe to Naked Science - http://goo.gl/wpc2Q1 Every other Wednesday we present a new video, so join us to see the truth laid bare... The story of a human life, from first cry to final breath, told from within the body. This documentary film combines state-of-the-art special effects, pioneering CGI, startling realistic models and real in-body photography. Exploring human physiology from birth, through the drama of puberty, into adulthood, and finally old age, the programme offers a visually-stunning insight into how our bodies function. Throughout life we undergo a continuous second-by-second transformation, every move we make and every outside stimulus triggers a reaction through the skin, bones, organs, muscles and cells. We breathe on average 700 million breaths in a lifetime, an adult skeleton is replaced every seven to 10 years, we shed as many as 30,000 dead skin cells every minute, and the food we eat travels 30 feet on its journey through our bodies. The Living Body takes you beneath the skin to reveal how our bodies evolve from birth to old age, and the amazing biological systems we need to thrive. Embark on an incredible journey tracing the story of one everywoman using milestones to examine the everyday workings of a living, functioning body in ways not seen before. Cutting-edge miniature endoscopic HD cameras delve deep inside the mouth, throat, heart, lungs, digestive tract, brain and reproductive organs to shed new light on how and why our bodies do what they do. Stunning photography reveals universal moments in human development at the most minute level, providing insight into both our own individual metamorphosis and our shared human experiences. Critically acclaimed “Inside the Living Body” won an Emmy for Outstanding Achievement in Graphic Design and Artistic Direction. Special Effects sequences created by David Barlow, 2004 winner of the prestigious Lennart Nilsson award for excellence and innovation in medical photography, and Bandito, one of the UK's leading CGI directors responsible for sequences in Animals in the Womb.
Views: 4170748 Naked Science
Anatomy & physiology of the circulatory system (heart)
 
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What is the cardiovascular system? The cardiovascular system includes both the heart, which pumps blood, as well as the blood vessels, which carry that blood to the body and lungs. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 700430 Osmosis
Kavalier Calm - My Cardiac Muscle
 
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For /u/DaveyDundo at: www.reddit.com/r/funny/comments/2clw9d/my_girlfriend_sketched_this_for_me_today/cjh3piz?context=3 Download this song for free here: https://kavaliercalm.bandcamp.com/track/my-cardiac-muscle My Cardiac Muscle You make my cardiac muscle pump blood through my vascular system really quickly. I am so into you I'm panicking; I feel fragile and stickly. I don't know if I can handle all this oxygen in my hemoglobin. I'm feeling high on endorphins; my neuropeptides are exploding, and I feel fine in their buzz. But I'm afraid a crash is coming when my body can't take anymore of your drug. CHORUS
Views: 108 ThePeoplesBard
Structure Of Bone Tissue - Bone Structure Anatomy - Components Of Bones
 
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In this video we discuss the structure of bone tissue and the components of bones. We also discuss what are osteons, what are canaliculi, what are trabeculae, and the components of bone matrix. Transcript/notes Structure of bone tissue The bones in your body are made up of an extraordinarily complex connective tissue that’s structure matches its function. It is comprised of cells, fibers and extracellular material or matrix. The bones in your body have 3 major types of bone cells. Let’s start by looking at a diagram of bone tissue. There are 2 main types of bone tissue, compact bone and cancellous bone or spongy bone. Compact bone surrounds the spongy bone tissue and it has a unique appearance. These cylinder shaped structures are called osteons or Haversian systems. In the middle of these osteons is a central Haversian canal that runs lengthwise through the bone and it houses nerves and blood vessels that supply the bone. The cylinder shaped layers of the osteons are called concentric lamellae. The lamellae are composed of calcified matrix. The matrix of the bones in your body is composed of inorganic salts and organic material. The inorganic matrix is made up of rocklike crystals of calcium and phosphate called hydroxyapatite crystals, calcium carbonate and magnesium, sodium, sulfate and fluoride are also found in bone material. The organic material is comprised of collagenous fibers and a gel like ground substance containing protein and polysaccharides. The ground substance is important in providing support and adhesion between cellular and fibrous elements. There is also circumferential lamellae that runs along the periosteum, which covers the outside of bones, and along the endosteum which lines the inner spongy bone tissue. Interstitial lamellae are located between osteons. Lacunae are the small spaces in bone tissue where mature bone cells called osteocytes are imprisoned. These cells are responsible for maintaining the bone matrix. Canaliculi are small canals that extend in many directions from the lacunae connecting to other lacunae and the central canal. They provide for intercellular communication and passageway for the delivery of nutrients to the osteocyte cells. There are also transverse canals which connect central canals to one another and these canals also house nerves and blood vessels. Now for spongy bone tissue. Spongy bone has no osteons as it has a lattice like appearance of crisscrossing branches called trabeculae. The trabeculae are comprised of endosteum surrounding parallel lamellae composed of bone matrix, and osteocytes in lacunae with canaliculi extending out from the lacunae. Some of the canaliculi open onto the surface of the trabeculae. Like in compact bone tissue, the canaliculi provide a passageway for nutrients to reach the osteocyte cells. The formation or lattice like look of spongy bone allows it to distribute any stress or pressure applied to it throughout the entire framework.
Views: 38385 Whats Up Dude
Circulatory system - Function, Definition - Human Anatomy | Kenhub
 
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This tutorial covers the structure and function of the circulatory system with its arteries, veins and capillaries. Learn all about anatomy at Kenhub: https://khub.me/5c6e8 Oh, are you struggling with learning anatomy? We created the ★ Ultimate Anatomy Study Guide ★ to help you kick some gluteus maximus in any topic. Completely free. Download yours today: https://khub.me/bfeia Let's explore the anatomy, structure and function of the circulatory system, or cardiovascular system! In this video we teach you how the blood flows from the heart to the peripheral tissues and back, using the systemic and pulmonary circuits. With the systemic circuit, the oxygenated blood is transported to the tissues, whereas with the pulmonary circuit, deoxygenated blood gets carried to the lungs. The heart has an average output of 5,6l/min for males and 4,9l for females. We explain the function of the heart as a muscle pump with its valves, atria and chambers, the arteries, veins and capillaries as well as the main components of the blood. - 0:18 components of the circulatory system - 0:43 cardiac circulatory system: pulmonary and systemic circuit - 1:27 structure of the heart as a muscular pump - 2:18 cardiac output - 2:50 types of blood vessels: veins, arteries, capillaries - 4:24 main components of the blood Want to test your knowledge on the circulatory system? Take this quiz: https://khub.me/ies38 Read more on how the circulatory system carries the blood through the entire body and truly understand, how the heart, lungs and blood vessels are connected with each other to form this wonderful system with our free article: https://khub.me/21lql For more engaging video tutorials, interactive quizzes, articles and an atlas of Human anatomy and histology, go to https://khub.me/3tj3n
Calcium Channel Blockers & Cardiovascular Pharmacology - (NCLEX RN Review 2019)
 
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✅ Like our video! 👍 Subscribe for new videos every month! Tired of expensive NCLEX test prep? Get our special $1 e-book: https://www.amazon.com/NCLEX-RN-2018-2019-Examination-Questions-ebook/dp/B07H3FKDHW Welcome to this video tutorial on calcium channel blockers, a class of cardiovascular drugs. Calcium channel blockers are a class of drugs that block calcium from entering into the cells of heart & blood vessel muscles. So, when a patient has high BP, angina, or heart arrhythmias, calcium channel blockers block calcium from entering the cell by binding to the L-type calcium channels. Therefore, calcium channel blockers cause smooth muscle relaxation (vasodilation). They dilate coronary arteries & peripheral arterioles, but NOT veins. They decrease the contractility of heart (also known as a negative inotropic effect). They decrease the heart rate (negative chronotropic effect). They decrease the conduction velocity within the heart, especially at the AV (atrioventricular) node (known as a negative dromotropic effect). Get an NCLEX Study Guide: http://www.mometrix.com/studyguides/n... Learn with NCLEX Flash Cards: https://www.flashcardsecrets.com/nclex/ Free NCLEX Practice Questions: http://www.mometrix.com/academy/nclex... STAY IN TOUCH! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmlc... Like NCLEX Prep Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/MometrixNCLEX/ Follow our NCLEX Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/MometrixNCLEX NCLEX Pinterest Board: https://goo.gl/NbA2CP
Views: 9452 NCLEX Study Guide
The first thing to do when you sit for USMLE/COMLEX
 
07:56
►Attention D.O. students! OMG OMT is now live! Check it out: https://omgomt.teachable.com/ ►PayPal (PLEASE DONATE): https://goo.gl/rK1CjC Your donation helps keep DirtyUSMLE free and more videos coming! ►Follow DirtyUSMLE on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DirtyUSMLE
Views: 5886 DirtyUSMLE
Congestive Heart Failure: Left-sided vs Right-sided, Systolic vs Diastolic, Animation.
 
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This video and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/cardiology-and-vascular-diseases ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Voice by: Sue Stern. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Heart failures can be due to an inability to PUMP effectively during systole - SYSTOLIC heart failure, or inability to FILL properly during diastole - DIASTOLIC heart failure. Heart failure can be right-sided or left-sided . In systolic heart failure, ventricular contraction is compromised. This may be caused by any condition that weakens the heart muscle: - Coronary artery disease/Ischemic HD: - Dilated cardiomyopathy - Hypertension: - Valvular heart disease: Damage to the valves, such as stenosis The effectiveness of ventricular contraction is measured by the EJECTION fraction. The normal range of the ejection fraction is between 50 and 70%. In systolic heart failure, it drops below 40%. In DIASTOLIC heart failure, the ventricle is filled with LESS blood. This may be because it is smaller than usual, or it has lost the ability to relax. The ejection fraction may be normal, but the blood output is reduced. The ejection fraction is therefore commonly used to differentiate between SYSTOLIC and DIASTOLIC dysfunction. Examples of conditions that can lead to diastolic heart failure include: - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy - Restrictive cardiomyopathy: - Hypertension Regardless of being systolic or diastolic in nature, left-sided heart failures share a common outcome: LESS blood pumped out from the heart. As a result, blood flows back to the lungs, where it came from, causing CONGESTION and INCREASED pulmonary pressure. As this happens, fluid leaks from the blood vessels into the lung tissue, resulting in PULMONARY EDEMA, a hallmark of left-sided heart failure. Accumulation of fluid in the alveoli IMPEDES the gas exchange process, resulting in respiratory symptoms such as shortness of breath, which worsens when lying down, and chest crackles. RIGHT-sided heart failure is most commonly caused by LEFT-sided heart failure. This is because the INCREASED pulmonary pressure caused by left-sided heart failure makes it harder for the right ventricle to pump INTO the pulmonary artery. This results in SYSTOLIC dysfunction. In compensation, the right ventricle grows thicker to pump harder, which reduces the space available for filling, eventually leading to DIASTOLIC dysfunction. Other common causes of right-sided heart failure include chronic lung diseases which also raise pulmonary blood pressure. As the right ventricle pumps out less blood, the blood, again, backs up to where it came from, and in this case, the SYSTEMIC circulation. This results in abnormal fluid accumulation in various organs, most notable in the feet when standing, sacral area when lying down, abdominal cavity and liver. The fluid status can be assessed by examining the distension level of the jugular vein. Heart failure is usually managed by treating the underlying condition, together with a combination of drugs. ACE inhibitors, beta blockers are used to reduce blood pressure in patients with systolic dysfunction. Diuretics are used to reduce water retention.
Views: 93994 Alila Medical Media
Surface Anatomy of the Axial Skeleton
 
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A demonstration lecture on the surface anatomy landmarks and palpation for the Axial Skeleton. To find out more about our work and the full range of our publications please visit our website: http://www.clinicalexams.co.uk/ The complete video collection can be streamed or downloaded from our Vimeo site: https://vimeo.com/user21235595/vod_pages Excerpts and free video clips can be found on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyG7qeIHTBGlJqNrBi-_1NA/videos?view_as=public&shelf_id=1&view=0&sort=dd Please subscribe to our channel to benefit from our regular releases of new videos. Bloomsbury Educational Limited 97 Judd Street, London, WC1H 9NE http://www.clinicalexams.co.uk/ DISCLAIMER: Bloomsbury Educational Ltd., the authors and actors will not be held responsible or liable for errors or any kind of loss or injury incurred as a result of the information conveyed in our videos. All procedures must be practiced in a supervised professional clinical setting. If you have a medical condition you must consult a qualified medical professional. All material and intellectual property used in these videos remain the property of Bloomsbury Educational Ltd. If you wish to use any of our footage, images and other material for public performance permission may be granted upon application.
How Your Heart Works
 
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Watch this movie about your heart and circulation - the system that sends blood throughout your body.
Views: 3479428 KidsHealth.org
Wigger's Diagram EXPLAINED WITHIN 3 MINUTES!!!
 
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An in-depth look at Wiggers Diagram. Examining the cardiac cycle, Electrocardiogram, Aortic Pressure, Ventricular Pressure, Atrial Pressure, Phonocariogram, and Ventricular Volume.
Views: 168276 Dr. Arzoo Sadiqi
Cardiac Conduction System and Understanding ECG, Animation.
 
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This video and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/cardiology-and-vascular-diseases ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia The cardiac conduction system consists of the following components: - The sinoatrial node, or SA node, located in the right atrium near the entrance of the superior vena cava. This is the natural pacemaker of the heart. It initiates all heartbeat and determines heart rate. Electrical impulses from the SA node spread throughout both atria and stimulate them to contract. - The atrioventricular node, or AV node, located on the other side of the right atrium, near the AV valve. The AV node serves as electrical gateway to the ventricles. It delays the passage of electrical impulses to the ventricles. This delay is to ensure that the atria have ejected all the blood into the ventricles before the ventricles contract. - The AV node receives signals from the SA node and passes them onto the atrioventricular bundle - AV bundle or bundle of His. - This bundle is then divided into right and left bundle branches which conduct the impulses toward the apex of the heart. The signals are then passed onto Purkinje (pur-KIN-jee) fibers, turning upward and spreading throughout the ventricular myocardium. Electrical activities of the heart can be recorded in the form of electrocardiogram, ECG or EKG. An ECG is a composite recording of all the action potentials produced by the nodes and the cells of the myocardium. Each wave or segment of the ECG corresponds to a certain event of the cardiac electrical cycle. When the atria are full of blood, the SA node fires, electrical signals spread throughout the atria and cause them to depolarize. This is represented by the P wave on the ECG. Atrial contraction , or atrial systole (SIS-toe-lee) starts about 100 mili-seconds after the P wave begins. The P-Q segment represents the time the signals travel from the SA node to the AV node. The QRS complex marks the firing of the AV node and represents ventricular depolarization: - Q wave corresponds to depolarization of the interventricular septum. - R wave is produced by depolarization of the main mass of the ventricles. - S wave represents the last phase of ventricular depolarization at the base of the heart. - Atrial repolarization also occurs during this time but the signal is obscured by the large QRS complex. The S-T segment reflects the plateau in the myocardial action potential. This is when the ventricles contract and pump blood. The T wave represents ventricular repolarization immediately before ventricular relaxation, or ventricular diastole (dy-ASS-toe-lee). The cycle repeats itself with every heartbeat. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 2461508 Alila Medical Media
(4) COSMETOLOGY; ANATOMY and Physiology: theory review
 
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http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCE5C71FF3E4C8657&feature=view_all (THE PLAYLIST LINK) Easy, simple instruction that helps MEMORISE the study material with examples, 3D charts, explanations; to help pass the state board of cosmetology written test and licenses for cosmetology, esthetician, manicurist and barbering. For the written test, state board requires the knowledge of Anatomy and Physiology: Skeletal System, Muscular System, and Circulatory System. This video includes instruction for: Anatomy, Physiology, Histology Cells: nucleus, protoplasm, cytoplasm, cell membrane, centrosome: cell reproduction, conditions, cell metabolism: anabolism and catabolism, and the balance of homeostasis; cell reproduction: mitosis and amitosis, and conditions for reproduction Tissue types: muscular tissue, connective tissue, epithelial tissue, liquid tissue Organs and their functions; brain, eyes, liver, lungs, kidneys, skin, stomach and intestines, and reproductive organs (listed only) Systems: circulatory, muscular, nervous (in detail), digestive, endocrine, excretory, integumentary systems (listed only) Skeletal System: the skull: cranium: occipital bone, parietal bones, frontal bone, temporal bones; facial bones: lacrimal bones (2), nasal bones (2), zygomatic bones, also called molar (cheek) bones, maxillae, mandible (the jaw bone). Bones of the neck: cervical vertebrae, hyoid: Adam's Apple; bones of the chest: clavicle, scapula, thorax, ribs, sternum. Bones of the arm and hands: humerus, ulna, radius, carpus, metacarpus, Phalanges. Anatomy of leg and foot: femur, tibia, fibula, patella, talus, ankle joint. Mology; muscular system: types of muscles: striated - voluntary, non-striated -- involuntary, cardiac --heart muscle. The 3 parts of the muscle: origin, belly, and insertion; massage from insertion to origin. Muscle of the scalp- occipitofrontalis. Platysma, sternocleidomastoideus muscle. Circulatory system; blood vascular system, lymph vascular system, lymph glands and the heart; chambers and valves of the heart: right and left atrium, right and left ventricles, valves, atria; blood circulation; pulmonary circulation, systemic or general circulation, red blood cells -- red corpuscles - erythrocytes, white blood cells -- white corpuscles -- leucocytes, platelets, plasma. Arteries of neck, face and hand. Neurology: study of nerves. Nervous system; cerebrospinal nervous system, peripheral nervous system, Autonomic Nervous System;The 3 types of nerves are sensory-afferent, motor- efferent, and mixed nerves; Nerves of face, neck and hands, including fifth cranial nerve branches, seventh cranial nerve branch. This video is a simple instruction for cosmetology Anatomy and Physiology for cosmetology students, beauty school students, esthetician students, students of out of state, cosmetology instructional material for teachers and estheticians; manicuring instructors, barbering instructors, skin care instructors and barbering school instructors. Video by BeautyHealthtravel Channel
Views: 159191 BeautyHealthTravel