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Ghost Towns - Yosemite Nature Notes - Episode 25
 
06:51
Sitting on the crest of the Sierra Nevada, Tioga Pass is a gateway to Yosemite's past. In 1880, a gold and silver rush erupted here, and miners flocked to Tioga Hill in droves. Today, the ghosts of these miners work can be seen in the stone walls of Dana Village,rusty machinery at Bennettville, and the log cabins of the Golden Crown Mine. Even today's popular Tioga Road was once a simple wagon road built to access the wealth of minerals that were never found. For an audio described version of this video, go to https://youtu.be/qG6SYCZhiQ0.
Views: 39080 yosemitenationalpark
Yosemite - The Old Garrotte Gold Mine
 
03:46
A visit to an old Gold mine in the hills of Yosemite near Groveland California. Back in the late 1800's this area was called Garrotte. In old Spanish, Garrotte means Death by Strangulation. Ya didn't mess with someone else's claim unless you were ready to risk it all. They still keep one of the old steam locomotives parked under the hangin' tree in town. This mine was dug by hand around 1860-70. It's worth a visit. Church Theme by Tangerine Dream Thanks for watching!
Views: 1940 Talladega Tom
Hiking Yosemite in 4K | Part 7: Bodie Ghost Town
 
19:23
Yeah, I know - Bodie is not actually located IN Yosemite National Park...BUT, if you're visiting Yosemite, it is definitely worth the side trip if you can spare the extra day to do it! The stark contrast in terrain is striking, given its proximity to Yosemite. And besides, it'll make you appreciate all those amazing Yosemite trees all the more! Ha! Join us as we explore this amazing piece of California Gold Rush Era history, frozen in time..in an "arrested state of decay". And stay for some breath-taking bonus drone video along scenic Hwy 108 in the high Sierras!
Views: 50 ReeWray Outdoors
Horsetail Fall | Yosemite National Park
 
07:57
Horsetail Fall is a small, ephemeral waterfall that flows over the eastern edge of El Capitan in Yosemite Valley. For two weeks in February, the setting sun striking the waterfall creates a deep orange glow that resembles Yosemite's historic "Firefall." Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Columbia State Historic Park - Columbia, California - Historic Gold Mining Town
 
05:54
Yesterday, the gold mining town of Columbia, California celebrated their 162nd birthday and Modesto News .org was on hand to capture the day on film. Being so isolated in the foothills of California, the town of Columbia remained untouched by the turn of the century innovations that changed the world 100 years ago. During the late 1930's and early 1940's the residents of Columbia, California looked around and realized they had something quite special in their midst, and approached the State Of California in an effort to have their town designated as an official State Park. The state agreed that the town should be preserved and in 1945 Columbia, California joined the State Park System. The Columbia State Historic Park offers educational entertainment for the entire family year round. The town is still an active town with hundreds of residents who call the State Park their home, and run the many shops that line the main street. The Columbia State Historic Park is only an hour drive from Modesto, California and is a must for every child in Modesto to experience. Modesto News .org is your one man news source in Modesto, California. It is your place to see our area through the eyes of Mick V. Rubalcava. You never know what is coming up next on Modesto News .org... Breaking action news, a celebrity interview, a live concert, or even a travel destination video like this one. Stay tuned for more Modesto News .org . Brought To You By: Crow Trading Company www.CrowTrading.com Burnside Body Shop www.BurnsideBodyShop.com The Modesto Art Walk www.ModestoArtWalk.com Genesis One Body & Soul www.GenesisOneBodyAndSoul.com http://www.ModestoNews.org All Rights Reserved - Copyright 2012
Views: 10240 Modesto News
Chinese Camp Ghost Town!!  Remnant Of Notable California Gold Rush Mining Town
 
06:24
Chinese Camp is a census-designated place (CDP) in Tuolumne County, California, United States. The population was 126 at the 2010 census, down from 146 at the 2000 census. It lies in the grassy foothills of the Sierra Nevada near the southern end of California's Gold Country. Royalty Free Music by http://audiomicro.com/royalty-free-music I will not attempt to contact with the artists who created the audio file(s) Link To Bodie California Ghost Town Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8v_BkxQuy1o
Views: 27651 MoneyBags73
Beautiful But Deadly Waters | Yosemite National Park
 
05:31
Safety: Water in Yosemite is incredibly beautiful, but can be powerful and deadly. Sixteen people died in Yosemite's creeks and rivers between 2002 and 2011. Yosemite Search and Rescue rangers share their knowledge of common mistakes and how to avoid them. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Experience Yosemite National Park, California
 
15:43
Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
The Glaciers of Yosemite National Park
 
08:15
Yosemite National Park is famous for its spectacular glacially carved landscape. The scenery that resulted from the interaction of the glaciers and the underlying rocks was the basis for its preservation as a national park. Although glaciers have come and gone many times in the past, there are still two active glaciers near Yosemite's highest peaks. Iconic landmarks such as Yosemite Valley, Hetch Hetchy, Yosemite Falls, Vernal and Nevada Falls, Bridalveil Fall, Half Dome, the Clark Range, and the Cathedral Range are known throughout the world. Landforms that are the result of glaciation include U-shaped canyons, jagged peaks, rounded domes, waterfalls, and moraines. Glacially-polished granite is further evidence of glaciation, and is common in Yosemite National Park. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Ghost Towns & Mines: Eureka Tunnel, NV 2018
 
03:53
The video features my visit to the Eureka Tunnel Mine in central Nevada. This is the fifth in a series of videos from my 2018 trip, where I explored old mines, mining camps, ghost towns and other historic sites in Nevada and the Mojave desert. I have more videos from this trip coming soon. Music: “Easy Guitars“ by music doctor Licensed by AudioJungle https://audiojungle.net/item/easy-guitars/22058661 “Folk Acoustic Theme” by Stellar Tracks Licensed by AudioJungle https://audiojungle.net/item/folk-acoustic-theme/9017066
Views: 426 raydunakin
Major Fire near Yosemite National Park moves with frightening speed
 
01:45
'An insane amount of heat' as fire near Yosemite National Park moves with frightening speed. It has destroyed 29 structures, temporarily cut off power to Yosemite National Park and threatened the historic gold-mining town of Mariposa, sending its residents fleeing. It’s sent its smoke as far away as Idaho, and it burned so hot that it created its own weather system. If the Detwiler fire, which has moved with frightening speed this week through the rugged terrain of rural Mariposa County, was looking to make a dramatic statement, it succeeded.
Views: 248 Real Thing TV
Swimming for Gold Near Yosemite
 
01:25
With some spare time, we took to the local creek to look for some (fool's) gold near Yosemite National Park.
Views: 69 R Smith
Ice flows like lava at Yosemite National Park
 
07:20
Summertime visitors to Yosemite National Park miss many of the unique events of winter and early spring. Frazil ice flows - a collection of loose, randomly oriented needle-shaped ice crystals flowing in water like lava, are dramatic natural events that occur in the waterfalls of Yosemite Valley during March and April. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Saving the yellow-legged frog | Yosemite National Park
 
08:23
Can we save the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog from extinction? Human introduced non-native species (fish and fungus) have been causing the frog to go from the most abundant amphibian in the Sierra Nevada to critically endangered. However, habitat restoration efforts in Yosemite are showing promising signs for the frog's recovery and long-term survival. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
The World on Wheels Presents: California Gold Rush Towns - Mariposa
 
07:39
A trip to the historic Motherlode town of Mariposa, California near Yosemite.
Views: 246 mrtimmywheels
Mariposa GOLD!
 
04:22
My brother and I prospecting around local Mariposa creek.
Views: 1833 Gold Bros.
Fremont Gold Mine Update
 
10:24
Vishal Gupta, President/CAO of Fremont Gold Mining in Bear Valley, Mariposa County California gave us an update on the work going on at the historic Pine Tree/Josephine mining property.
Detwiler Fire near Yosemite National Park burns over 70,000 acres
 
02:27
A raging wildfire, burning near Yosemite National Park, has grown to over 70 thousand acres, destroyed dozens of structures and is only 10 percent contained. The Detwiler Fire on Thursday was threatening about 1,500 homes and other buildings, after already destroying 45 structures. It's not clear what type of buildings burned. The flames are near Highway 49, a historical route winding through Sierra Nevada foothills dotted with little towns that drew gold miners to California in the 1800s. More than 3,000 firefighters are battling the 5-day-old blaze that has scorched 109 square miles, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. The fire has forced almost 5,000 people from homes in and around a half-dozen small communities, officials said.
Views: 1944 Around Us
AY20: The Great Sierra Mine
 
19:42
On the Northeastern edge of Yosemite National Park is the remains of an intensive silver mining operation that only lasted a few years. The area was prospected in the 1850's by dentist George Chase, claims were made in 1860 by William Brusky, Jr., but nothing serious was done until 1880's when the claims were bought by the Great Sierra Consolidated Silver Mining Company and a small town with post office built solely with available rock shale. Abandoning the site a year later because of severe winter weather that occurs at the 11,000 foot altitude, an attempt was made to tunnel through the side of the hill but after $300,000 was spent trying to tunnel through solid rock, the company went bust. As usual, the property changed hands many times and there was a small attempt made in 1933 which only managed to tunnel 700' before shutting down and the area abandoned with the Sheepherder silver lode never having been reached. The site is easy to reach from the Tioga Pass gate with only the 600' climb right at the beginning and the numerous pesky insects providing a challenge. There's 5 stone cabins, a powder house, and a blacksmith shop. Because I was picking up a friend, there wasn't time to explore the other prospects and shafts nearby. This is my first video edited with Pinnacle Studio version 21. I haven't upgraded since version 12.
Bodie ghost town | 10 Fun Facts | Abandoned California Gold Mining Town | USA
 
03:44
10 Fun Facts About Bodie, California's Best & Most Famous Abandoned Gold Mining Town in Mono County, USA. Bodie is a former gold-mining town and State Historic Park in California’s Bodie Hills, near the Nevada border. This 19th-century ghost town encompasses numerous original buildings in varying states of decay, plus artifacts and the Masonic Cemetery. Miners Union Hall houses a museum with mining tools. Northeast is the Standard Gold Mill, with machinery and information about the process of gold extraction. Bodie Website | http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=509 Bodie | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodie,_California Bodie Travel guide | https://www.google.com/destination?q=bodie&num=100&newwindow=1&client=firefox-b-ab&site=search&output=search&dest_mid=/m/01x0hm&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjCnvHDz4DeAhUrK8AKHcZ8Ao4Qri4wf3oECAsQIw#dest_mid=/m/01x0hm&tcfs=EhoaGAoKMjAxOC0xMC0yOBIKMjAxOC0xMS0wMQ Twitter | https://twitter.com/USAGhostTowns Tumblr | https://ameicanghosttowns.tumblr.com/ About my Channel. Welcome to my channel, the OFFICIAL home of American Ghost Towns, I make video's about Ghost Towns in America and other parts of the world, with the HISTORY and FACTS about these towns. Also video's about Travel and People. Don't Forget to Like, Share and Subscribe Here | https://www.youtube.com/c/AmericanGho... Thanks for visiting. #BodieGhostTown #10Facts #AmericanGhostTowns #Bodie #BodieCalifornia #Funfacts
Views: 2164 American Ghost Towns
Stargazing in Yosemite National Park
 
07:36
Yosemite's vast acreage and remote location protect some of the darkest night skies in the country. Astronomers, photographers, and stargazers flock to the park to take advantage of this unique opportunity to view planets, stars, and galaxies. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
The Giant Trees of Yosemite National Park
 
07:50
Most of Yosemite National Park is blanketed with vast forests, and with abundant precipitation and warm temperatures, these mountains are home to the largest trees in the world including the Giant Sequoias, the world's largest single trees by volume. With necks-turned-straight-up, grove visitors often ask: "How old is that tree?" So, just how long can certain Yosemite tree species live? Whitebark pine, Western juniper and Douglas-fir can live more than 1,000 years while giant sequoias can live more than 3,000 years. Yosemite National Park's massive giant sequoias live in three groves in the park. The most easily accessible of these is the Mariposa Grove near the park's South Entrance, off of the Wawona Road (Highway 41). Two smaller—and less visited—groves are the Tuolumne and Merced groves near Crane Flat. The Mariposa Grove contains about 500 mature giant sequoias including Yosemite's famous Grizzly Giant, best estimated to be 1,800 years old plus or minus a few centuries, which is nothing to a giant sequoia. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Prospect Yosemite (diyminers)
 
03:04
Guided Gold Panning and Prospecting Lessons Just Outside Yosemite National Park prospectyosemite.com
Views: 277 Branden Jon
S3 E4: Ghost Towns
 
26:41
Some California dreams succeeded, creating megalopolis regions in the state’s north and south. Other dreams failed, leaving nothing but ruins. This episode explores three California ghost towns: Bodie, a Mono County gold mining settlement that was preserved in time; Llano Del Rio, a socialist utopian community in the Mojave Desert; and Zzyzx, a former health spa on the way to Las Vegas.
Views: 5746 KCETOnline
GOLD MINING TOWN OF RANDSBURG CA,
 
03:32
RANDSBURG IS A SMALL MINING TOWN LOCATED JUST OF HIGHWAY 395 IN KERN COUNTY CALIFORNIA.
99 Structures Destroyed By Fire Near Yosemite
 
00:51
Getty Images A blaze burning in foothills west of Yosemite National Park destroyed dozens of structures and forced thousands to flee Gold Rush-era towns but fire crews have been able to stop it from reaching a threatened community in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. As of Thursday, the Detwiler fire has scorched 70,096 acres, destroyed 45 structures and is threatening about 1,500 homes and other buildings. It's not clear what type of buildings burned. The flames are near Highway 49, a historical route winding through Sierra Nevada foothills dotted with little towns that drew gold miners to California in the 1800s. http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Couldnt-Even-See-the-Sun-Detwiler-Fire-Burns-70096-Acres-Near-Yosemite-Destroys-45-Structures-435643653.html http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com
Views: 395 Wochit News
Bannack Ghost Town | Abandoned Gold Mining Town | Montana | USA
 
03:40
Bannack is a ghost town in Beaverhead County, Montana, United States, located on Grasshopper Creek, approximately 11 miles (18 km) upstream from where Grasshopper Creek joins with the Beaverhead River south of Dillon. Founded in 1862, the town contemporarily operates as a National Historic Landmark and is managed by the state of Montana as Bannack State Park. Bannack State Park | http://bannack.org/ Bannack Travel Guide | https://www.google.com/destination?q=bannack+travel+guide&num=100&newwindow=1&client=firefox-b-ab&site=search&output=search&dest_mid=/m/05wqf1&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi_ub6fzu_dAhWCUZAKHaFnAPgQri4waHoECAoQGQ#dest_mid=/m/05wqf1&tcfs=EhoaGAoKMjAxOC0xMC0yMRIKMjAxOC0xMC0yNQ Bannack | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bannack,_Montana Twitter | https://twitter.com/USAGhostTowns Tumblr | https://ameicanghosttowns.tumblr.com/ About my Channel. Welcome to my channel, the OFFICIAL home of American Ghost Towns, I make video's about Ghost Towns in America and other parts of the world, with the HISTORY and FACTS about these towns. Also video's about Travel and People. Don't Forget to Like, Share and Subscribe Here | https://www.youtube.com/c/AmericanGho... Thanks for visiting. #Bannack #BannackMontana #AmericanGhostTowns
Views: 3879 American Ghost Towns
Julian - San Diego Attractions - California Ghost Towns
 
02:15
California Travel Expert Veronica Hill of http://www.CaliforniaTravelExpert.com and the California Essential Guide (http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id428163062?mt=8) app visits Julian California in this episode of "California Travel Tips." This charming little ghost town — located an hour from San Diego — comes alive during the fall, when it celebrates the famous Julian apple harvest. Bring along a light jacket as you explore the town's quaint stores, restaurants and delicious homemade apple pies. Julian's mining history dates back to 1869, when San Diego experienced its first (and only) Gold Rush. Today, Main Street is filled with dozens of fun shops and attractions. You can hitch a ride on a horse and buggy, do a bit of wine tasting, or get a Western-style portrait taken at Grandpa's Old Time Photo. To learn more about Julian's mining history, join a tour at Eagle and High Peak Mine, located at the end of C Street. Train rides are available on the Smith Ranch and Julian Railroad by appointment. Kids will enjoy panning for gold at the Julian Mining Company, or getting an old-fashioned phosphate at the Miner's Diner soda fountain. But the real draw in Julian is the apple pie, and visitors are fiercely divided on who makes the best. I'm partial to Julian Pie Company, a cozy little diner with a loyal following. Be sure to get here early, as lines quickly form out the door. Once you've had your fill of pie, walk off the calories with a tour of Julian's pioneer cemetery and historic Gold Rush buildings. The Jacoby Building, built in 1897, was the town's original general store. The Wilcox Building, which dates back to 1872, once served as a stage coach stop and Julian's post office. If you want to spend the night, consider staying in the Julian hotels. The Julian Gold Rush Hotel, which was built in 1897, is one of California's best B&Bs, and well worth a visit. Music by Kevin MacLeod at http://www.Incompetech.com SUBSCRIBE! http://tinyurl.com/p2fveuj LIKE ME ON FACEBOOK http://tinyurl.com/nqx9osq CIRCLE ME ON GOOGLE PLUS http://tinyurl.com/odkmbqk FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER https://twitter.com/Californiatips FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/californiatraveltips BUY MY APPS! California Essential Guide App: ITUNES: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id428163062?mt=8 GOOGLE PLAY: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sutromedia.android.guide.ca.essential.guide568&hl=en Yosemite Travel Essentials App: ITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=606694986&mt=8 DISNEYLAND INSIDER'S TRAVEL GUIDE ITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/ua/app/disneyland-insiders-travel/id528739310?mt=8 GOOGLE PLAY: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sutromedia.android.guide.disney.guide&hl=en
Views: 38251 California Travel Tips
Calico Ghost Town - Mojave Desert
 
03:25
California travel expert Veronica Hill shares a guide to Calico Ghost Town in this episode of "California Travel Tips." Located in the dusty Mojave Desert — roughly 10 miles north of Barstow — Calico was named for the rainbow-colored hills that produced one of the richest silver strikes in California history. Home to 1,200 residents by 1887, this was a wild and woolly place — with 22 saloons, its own red light district and several fine restaurants. Today, Calico has five surviving original buildings: the Park Office, Lane's General Store, Lil's Saloon, and The Zenda Mining Company. Plan on a full day to explore. You can do a bit of gold panning; walk sideways in the Mystery Shack; take a ride on the Calico & Odessa Narrow Gauge Railway; or explore more than 1,000 feet of tunnel inside the Maggie Mine Shaft. Around lunch, grab a cold beer and burger at Old Miner's Cafe, or enjoy an old-fashioned sarsparilla at the Calico House Restaurant. Then, hike off your meal on the East Calico Hiking Trail, where you'll find unique cabins carved into the rocky hillsides. Calico produced more than $20 million in silver, and was deserted by the 1930s. Walter Knott (of Knott's Berry Farm fame) purchased the crumbling town in 1951 for $13,500, restoring it to its former glory. It is now run by the park service. Tips: Calico takes credit cards and there are several ATMs on site. You can stay the night in Calico's campgrounds or bunkhouse. The ghost town is located off I-15 en route to Las Vegas. LIKE ME ON FACEBOOK http://tinyurl.com/nqx9osq CIRCLE ME ON GOOGLE PLUS http://tinyurl.com/odkmbqk FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER https://twitter.com/Californiatips FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/californiatraveltips BUY MY APPS! California Essential Guide App: ITUNES: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id428163062?mt=8 GOOGLE PLAY: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sutromedia.android.guide.ca.essential.guide568&hl=en Yosemite Travel Essentials App: ITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=606694986&mt=8 DISNEYLAND INSIDER'S TRAVEL GUIDE ITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/ua/app/disneyland-insiders-travel/id528739310?mt=8 GOOGLE PLAY: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sutromedia.android.guide.disney.guide&hl=en
Views: 14230 California Travel Tips
Visiting Yosemite National Park in Winter | Yosemite Trip Planning
 
06:28
Yosemite Trip Planning: Winter is a magical time to visit Yosemite, with opportunities for hiking, playing in the snow, and quiet solitude. The silence and beauty of Yosemite in winter is an unforgettable experience. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Nevada City, MT Ghost Town
 
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Ghost town of the Alder Gulch Gold field in Southwestern Montana.
Views: 11207 Tim Kelly
Moderate Valley Hikes in Yosemite National Park | Yosemite Trip Planning
 
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Yosemite Trip Planning: In this video, a ranger describes moderate hikes in Yosemite Valley, including, the Valley Loop Trail, the trail to the Vernal Fall Footbridge, and Columbia Rock. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Rockfall | Yosemite National Park
 
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Since the glaciers retreated around 15,000 years ago, rock fall has been the major force of change in Yosemite Valley. Geologists work to understand this force of nature in order to protect the millions of visitors who come here each year. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Hot Springs & Bodie Ghost Town
 
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Leaving Yosemite, we journeyed north a short ways to the Travertine Hot Springs and the ghost town of Bodie, which is a CA state park. It was nice to enjoy the stars and Milky Way in the springs, and Bodie turned out to be pretty neat though you couldn't go in any buildings (unless on a special tour for more money). A funny story is I'd read several accounts of how they prosecute those that are on the property outside open hours and they had several signs stating as much so I parked on the side of the road outside the fence since we had arrived 45 minutes early. I reorganized all the food, cleaned the trunk and boiled water so Sydney could finally have oatmeal. The next 2 vehicles did continue past (perhaps they were employees?), but the remaining 4 parked on the road as well. The first one to do that commented, "I hate it when people guilt me into doing the right thing." I just smiled.
Views: 3153 topshotrhit
Jean's visit to the Eastern Sierras: Bodie Ghost Town, Rock Creek Pack Station,  Mono Lake, Yosemite
 
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In 1993 Jean and I met near Bishop, CA. We visited Bodie gold rush ghost town, Yosemite National Park, Mono Lake and its tufa formations, Lee Vining, CA, and horse riding into the high country from the Rock Creek Pack Station. To view other videos produced by Franklin Clay Films go to www.wyzvideos.com
Views: 94 franklinclayfilms
Ghost Towns of the Mother Lode #2
 
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Take a guided tour through Eastern California's Ghost Towns and Yosemite Park. See: Jamestown, Chinese Camp, Big Oak Flat, Yosemite National Park, and Bodie, California
Views: 460 Dan Holt
Bodie Ghost Town - California
 
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Bodie is a ghost town in the Bodie Hills east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in Mono County, California, United States, about 75 miles (121 km) southeast of Lake Tahoe. It became a boom town in 1876 and following years, after the discovery of a profitable line of gold, and suddenly attracted several thousand residents. It is located 12 mi (19 km) east-southeast of Bridgeport, at an elevation of 8379 feet (2554 m).The U.S. Department of the Interior recognizes the designated Bodie Historic District as a National Historic Landmark. Also registered as a California Historical Landmark, the ghost town officially was established as Bodie State Historic Park in 1962. It receives about 200,000 visitors yearly. Since 2012, Bodie has been administered by the Bodie Foundation, which uses the tagline Protecting Bodie's Future by Preserving Its Past.
Views: 821 Kool Buildings
The Granite Monolith of Half Dome | Yosemite National Park
 
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Rising nearly 5,000 feet above Yosemite Valley and 8,800 feet above sea level, the granite monolith of Half Dome is recognized throughout the world as an icon of Yosemite National Park. Thousands of visitors hike to the summit each year, rewarded with spectacular views and an experience that is not easily forgotten. Much of the hike to Half Dome is an adventure into Wilderness. For most, it is an exciting, arduous hike; for a few, it becomes more of an adventure than they wanted. The 14- to 16-mile round-trip hike to Half Dome is not for you if you're out of shape or unprepared. You will be gaining elevation (for a total of 4,800 feet) most of your way to the top of Half Dome. Most would say the reward is worth the effort. Along the way, you'll see outstanding views of Vernal and Nevada Falls, Liberty Cap, Half Dome, and--from the shoulder and summit--panoramic views of Yosemite Valley and the High Sierra. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciersadd into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
California Gold Mine "For Sale" Cherry Hill Mine
 
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There’s Gold In Them Hills! The Right Time for an Informed Investor! CALIFORNIA GOLD MINE “ For Sale “ ___Cherry Hill Mine___ The Cherry Hill Mine: Established in 1892, a formerly producing, small underground high-grade gold mine. One of the benefits of purchasing a past-producing mine is that the cost of moving into production is much lower than the cost of bringing a mine from the exploration phase to the production phase. Location: When thinking of mines you tend to visualize a hard-to-reach, remote, backcountry hillsides that require vast amounts of money to ensure adequate infrastructure. That isn’t the case with Cherry Hill. Because Cherry Hill is a formerly producing mine, all the infrastructure is already there. That means you have a leg up on some of the costs involved with getting the mine up and running. The mine is just a short ride from the town of Yreka, California, down a state-operated, paved road that turns into a well-maintained gravel road. It's easy to get to and has great access to the I-5, a major artery running north-south along the West Coast. It also means that when you do ramp up production, the heavy-duty trucks won't have much of an issue getting the ore from the mine to the mill. Historical Geological Reports: 1892 0.97 oz Au/ton with Ore running at $20.00 Au/ton (Yreka Journal, 11/16/1892). In 1892 100 tons milled by Selby avg. $61.00/ton (3oz Au equivalent/ton) (Yreka Journal 12/7/1892). On July 24th 1900 the mill run produced $5,300. (254.4 oz Au; 10.7 oz/day; 10 tons/day at 1 oz Au/ton Mining and Scientific Press 7/14/1900). 2003 Core Drilling produced 25' of 1.024 oz Au/ton - 30' of 4.758 oz Au/ton and 39.5 oz Ag/ton. Historical Resource Estimate by R. L Hill, CA Reg.Geologist #3386, Jan 5, 2009. Primary Target - Queen Vein WQ #3 and WQ #4 levels at 8889 yrds³ = 20,000 short tons at 1 opt at $1200 worth $24,000,000. Level 2 - WQ #4 to Camp Level at 9778 yrds³ = 22,000 short tons at 1 opt at $1,200 worth $26,400,000. Camp Level to Long Tunnel Adit approx 300,000 oz...previous owner estimation. 42,000 tons blocked out - based on established mine plan. 43-101 independent Technical Report completed May 22nd, 2012. Between 2011 - 2013 approx $2.6 million spent on exploration and development mining (all figures verified by audit). Low cost producer - estimated cost per oz Au at $400. Metallurgy testing (Norris Labs of Montana) indicates 95% recoveries for gold and 87% for silver. 80% of recoverable ore from gravity. Eight known adits on 7 unpatented lode claims situated on 94.6 Acres. Multiple assays completed with underground surveys. Defining a resource is a big expense for exploration companies, costing millions of dollars to complete. In purchasing a previously producing mine, You will have forgone the costly resource definition process because, “this was all done, we know what's here, so just go mine it!” Price $1,295,000 - Will consider all reasonable offers For the opportunity to discuss the mines in further detail, please contact: Philip Physioc [email protected] or (702) 822-0237
Winter in Yosemite National Park
 
02:38
While most visitors come during the summer months, winter is a magical time to visit Yosemite National Park, with opportunities for hiking, playing in the snow, and quiet solitude. The silence and beauty of Yosemite in winter is an unforgettable experience. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Chinese History | Yosemite National Park
 
07:33
Did you know that early Chinese immigrants played an important role in shaping the Yosemite that we know today? Join Park Ranger Yenyen Chan on an exploration of this impressive and surprising history. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Easy Off Road 4X4 Trails In Southern California
 
04:53
Are you new to off roading and looking for some easy 4x4 trails to get started on? This is the NotaRubicon’s list of favorite easy and beginner offroad trails. All of these 4x4 trails can be completed by any stock 4x4 vehicle and most are short enough that they can be completed in just a few hours. If you have questions about any of these trails please leave a comment and we will do our best to answer. Additional photos provided by: Peggy Marty Number 10 - Rainbow Basin The very first trail that The Notarubion ever went on was Rainbow Basin . So easy, it can hardly be considered a trail, it’s a great dirt road for first-time off-road driver. Rainbow Basin is a colorful geologic formation in the Calico Peaks mountain range, about 8 miles north of Barstow just off of Ft. Irwin Road. The Rainbow basin is known for it’s beautifully colored rock formations. Number 9 - The Red Canyon Jeep Trail The Red Canyon Trail is a scenic trail that starts at Interstate 10 runs through the hills to Summit Road near Salton Sea. This trail is mostly flat easy road but there is one large, steep and intimidating hill to get up but any stock Jeep can make it easily. Number 8 - The Bradshaw Trail The Bradshaw Trail runs from Salton Sea to Blythe and is mostly flat, easy road with just a few sections of sand. There are several interesting things to see along the way including the abandoned Eagle Mountain railroad bridge. Number 7 - Rattlesnake Canyon Rattlesnake Canyon goes from highway 247 in Johnson Valley up into the mountains near Big Bear. There are a few sandy areas, a few narrow rocky spots, and usually mud in the winter months but any 4X4 Jeep or truck can complete this trail easily. Most times of the year you will find dozens of cows roaming free throughout the entire area Number 6 - Burns Canyon Road (2N02) Burns Canyon Road is an flat, easy dirt road that connects Pioneertown to Baldwin Lake near Big Bear. The Burns Canyon trail offers great views and also connects you with several other nearby trails such as Rattlesnake Canyon or harder trails such as Marble Canyon, Heartbreak Ridge and the Garden of Eden Jeep trail. Number 5 - Lytle Creek Ridge The Lytle Creek Ridge Trail is an easy trail composed mostly of fire roads and power line roads which cross the San Bernardino National Forest near the Cajon Pass. The trail runs from Lytle Creek to Lone Pine Canyon and offers beautiful views of the Inland Empire and Cajon Pass. Number 4 - Old Dale Road Old Dale Road in Joshua Tree runs through the Pinto Basin and into the Pinto Mountains, where it becomes Gold Crown Road. The route ends at Highway 62 not far from 29 Palms. There are dozens of abandoned mines and historic mining camps lining the route making it one of the NotaRubicon’s Favorites. There are a few rocky spots and shallow water crossing in winter months, but any stock Jeep or high-clearance 4x4 vehicle can travel this entire road easily. Number 3 - Phillips Loop near Calico Ghost Town Phillips Loop is a beautiful scenic drive in the historic Calico mining district not far from Barstow. The loop takes you through the beautiful mountains and landscape of the Calico Mountains and takes you to Kramer’s Arch - an amazing natural structure large enough to drive your Jeep through. Number 2 - Cajon Bypass  (3N45) Cajon Bypass (3N45) also known as Old Rt 66 is a short, rough, dirt road that was part of the Historic Route 66 over 100 years ago. Starting at the summit of Cajon Pass behind where the Old Summit Inn once stood, it winds its way through the hills offering beautiful views of Cajon Pass before it connects to Highway 138 Number 1 - Cleghorn Trail (2N47) The Notarubicon’s favorite trail! Cleghorn is a 14 mile long trail that is actually a flat dirt road but it has several optional offshoots that range from easy to difficult - perfect for practicing your off-road and 4X4 skills. Many of the offshoots on Cleghorn are steep, off-camber and full of deep ruts but if you stay on the road instead, it’s flat and easy making this the perfect trail for beginners to practice on.
Quad-ATV Trail ride to Masonic Ghost Town and Mine and Bodie Ghost Town - Mono County CA
 
15:18
Bridgeport, CA is the starting point of these ATV trail rides to see Bodie Ghost Town and the Masonic Mine town from 1860 (Most productive in 1901). Lots of history on these rides. Masonic elevation 8000 ft was built on three levels or terraces with the middle level having the main street through town. Now a ghost town, with no residents but rodents. It was named Masonic because most of the residents, then, were masons. Very interesting to explore! Bodie, CA a town frozen in time: In 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880! "Bodie is the best preserved ghost town in California. Perhaps the country! Bodie was once a thriving gold mining town with 10000 residents in 1879."(bodie.com) Fascinating! A two day quad riding adventure with Harvey, Cherilyn, Keith and Linda. © Harvey Bolton and OnewithQuad.com 2012 Photos by Harvey, Cherilyn and Keith for more info visit www.onewithquad.com
Views: 5712 onewithquad
Moonbows | Yosemite National Park
 
06:42
During the full moon of the the spring and early summer, lunar rainbows, also known as moonbows, can be seen on many park waterfalls. Moonbows are relatively faint, due to the smaller amount of light reflected from the surface of the moon. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Calico Ghost Town | Abandoned Silver Mining Town | California | USA
 
03:40
Calico is a ghost town and former mining town in San Bernardino County, California, United States. Located in the Calico Mountains of the Mojave Desert region of Southern California, it was founded in 1881 as a silver mining town, and today has been converted into a county park named Calico Ghost Town. Located off Interstate 15, it lies 3 miles (4.8 km) from Barstow and 3 miles from Yermo. Giant letters spelling CALICO can be seen on the Calico Peaks behind the ghost town from the freeway. Walter Knott purchased Calico in the 1950s, architecturally restoring all but the five remaining original buildings to look as they did in the 1880s. Calico received California Historical Landmark #782, and in 2005 was proclaimed by then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to be California's Silver Rush Ghost Town. Calico Website | http://cms.sbcounty.gov/parks/Parks/CalicoGhostTown.aspx Calico | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calico,_San_Bernardino_County,_California Calico Travel Guide | https://www.google.com/destination?q=calico+ghost+town&num=100&newwindow=1&client=firefox-b-ab&site=search&output=search&dest_mid=/m/01wyjf&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiYvLuVt-_dAhVsJMAKHTOGB-sQri4we3oECAoQJA#dest_mid=/m/01wyjf&tcfs=EhoaGAoKMjAxOC0xMC0yMRIKMjAxOC0xMC0yNQ Twitter | https://twitter.com/USAGhostTowns Tumblr | https://ameicanghosttowns.tumblr.com/ About my Channel. Welcome to my channel, the OFFICIAL home of American Ghost Towns, I make video's about Ghost Towns in America and other parts of the world, with the HISTORY and FACTS about these towns. Also video's about Travel and People. Don't Forget to Like, Share and Subscribe Here | https://www.youtube.com/c/AmericanGho... Thanks for visiting. #CalicoCalifornia #CalicoGhostTown #AmericanGhostTowns
Views: 4213 American Ghost Towns
Tuolumne River | Yosemite National Park
 
07:59
Explore the Tuolumne River from its glacial headwaters at 13,000 feet down through Tuolumne Meadows and into the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne. Scientists and rangers describe the power this river has on the landscape and on the people who visit it. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Importance of Fire | Yosemite National Park
 
26:23
Who would have thought that giant sequoia groves need to be burned in order to be saved? Despite their best intentions, early park managers discovered the importance of fire the hard way. See how today's managers have learnt from the past and carefully manage fire in Yosemite. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids
Bodie the historic ghost town in California
 
00:34
http://www.pravda.ru/photo/album/17743/ Bodie the historic ghost town in California was named after Waterman S Body who discovered gold in 1859. The Standard Mine yielded nearly $15 million over 25 years and its success caused the 1878 rush to Bodie. By 1879 the town's population swelled to around 10,000. In 1881 the rich mines were depleted and population dropped to 1500 by 1886. In 1932 a fire destroyed all but 10% of the town. Bodie then faded into a ghost town in the 1940s. Only 5% of the town remains in 'arrested decay' and exists as it did when the last residents left. The ghost town became a Californian State Park in 1962. In 1986 Irish band U2 shot photos for their 'Joshua Tree' album in Bodie and with last month's announcement that up to 70 Californian State Parks are to close Bodie is under serious threat. Tourists and locals still visit Bodie today and with recent news that parts of America are becoming ghost towns could this be the future look of the country.
Views: 923 Pravda Report
Olmsted Plowing | Yosemite National Park
 
03:30
Every spring, both visitors and locals look forward to the opening of the Tioga Road, a high-elevation pass that crosses Yosemite National Park. Get a glimpse of what it takes to clear snow and ice from a section of the highway known for dangerous avalanches. Yosemite National Park covers nearly 1,200 square miles of mountainous terrain in the Sierra Nevada of California. From high peaks and deep canyons to ancient forests and quiet meadows, the diversity of the world is on display here. At Yosemite you can see the tranquillity of the High Sierra, the power of glaciers, giant sequoia groves, thundering waterfalls, clear streams and much more. Designated a World Heritage Site in 1984, Yosemite is also home to hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Two Wild & Scenic Rivers, the Tuolumne and Merced rivers, begin in the park and flow west to the Central Valley. Visitors experience the park's 800 miles of hiking trails and 282 miles of road. Visitors fall in love with the park's many waterfalls, specifically 2,425-foot Yosemite Falls that ranks as the tallest in North America, flowing down into the scenic Valley meadows. Hikers take notice of the enormous granite mountains from the 8,842-foot Half Dome to the 13,114-foot Mt. Lyell-Yosemite's tallest peak. Glaciers, which John Muir sought out in California as well as Alaska, add into the mix with the Maclure and Lyell still intact. "It is by far the grandest of all the special temples of Nature I was ever permitted to enter." —John Muir Animals: Yosemite supports more than 400 species of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Overall, the park's widespread coniferous forests--with a relatively mild climate and a mixture of plant species--provide a lush habitat for animals to live. Wildlife species typically found include mule deer, black bear, bobcat, gray fox, mountain kingsnake, Gilbert's skink, white-headed woodpecker, brown creeper, spotted owl, and a wide variety of bat species. Black bears in Yosemite are active both day and night. Most bears that rely on natural food sources are active during the day. However, those that get food from people are often active at night, when they can quietly sneak around and grab unattended food. Plants: Move up or down in elevation and feel as though you are in another park. Vegetation changes from oak woodlands to chaparral scrublands to lower montane to upper montane to subalpine to alpine. Those who step into the alpine zone can see krummholz whitebark pines and perhaps a western juniper or mountain hemlock. Scientists study many individual plants, including the black oak, to understand its future challenges. TRAVEL & TOURISM Yosemite is open all year, though some areas of the park are inaccessible by car from approximately November through May due to snow. Distances and Driving Times From: San Francisco/Bay area (195 mi, 4-5 hours); Sacramento (176 mi, 4 hours); Reno & Lake Tahoe (June through October, conditions permitting, 218 mi, 5 hours/All year, 315 mi, 8 hours); Los Angeles area (313 mi, 6 hours); San Diego area (441 mi, 8 hours); Las Vegas (June through October, conditions permitting, 642 km, 8 hours / November through May, 797 km, 8-10 hours) Drivers can enter Yosemite National Park by several routes: From the West and Most Scenic: CA Hwy 140 This route is by far the most scenic drive into Yosemite National Park and the best way to go if you're visiting for the first time. It's open most of the time and passes through the towns of Mariposa and Fish Camp. It's also a popular route for people driving to Yosemite from the San Jose area. From the West: CA Hwy 120 Open most any time, this route goes through Oakdale and Groveland and is often used by visitors from the San Francisco Bay area and northern California. It passes through fruit and almond orchards, small agricultural towns, fruit stands and ranches in the rolling foothills before ascending sharply up the Priest Grade to Big Oak Flat and the old gold mining town of Groveland. From the South: CA Hwy 41 From US Hwy 99 at Fresno, Hwy 41 runs north and west toward Yosemite's South Entrance, which takes you through the towns of Oakhurst and Fish Camp and into the park near the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias and Wawona. From the East: CA Hwy 120 and Tioga Pass To find out more about traveling this route, average opening and closing dates, check the guide to the Tioga Pass. From the East: Other Mountain Passes Other mountain passes that can get you across the Sierras near Yosemite include the Sonora Pass (CA Hwy 108), Monitor Pass (CA Hwy 89) and Ebbetts Pass (CA Hwy 4). Snow may also close these routes in winter, but they are sometimes open when Tioga Pass is still snow-clogged. Yaroooh! for Kids | News - Magazine http://www.Yaroooh.com https://www.youtube.com/user/YarooohForKids