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The Truth About Abraham Lincoln
 
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Did you know that Abraham Lincoln was abandoned by his father and was suicidal for many years? Do you know the hidden story behind how Lincoln became president? What is the truth about Abraham Lincoln? Freedomain Radio is 100% funded by viewers like you. Please support the show by signing up for a monthly subscription or making a one time donation at: http://www.fdrurl.com/donate Sources: http://americacomesalive.com/2013/02/12/abraham-lincoln-1809-1865-president-from-1861-1865/ http://mrnussbaum.com/lincoln/childhood/ https://suite101.com/a/abraham-lincoln-was-permanently-estranged-from-his-abusive-father-a376107 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3036550/ http://history1800s.about.com/od/Lincoln-Family/f/Was-Mary-Todd-Lincoln-Mentally-Ill.htm http://www.pbs.org/wnet/lookingforlincoln/featured/watch-looking-for-lincoln/290/ http://www.mises.org/daily/952 https://www.lewrockwell.com/2002/06/thomas-dilorenzo/is-there-a-libertarian-case-for-lincoln/ http://archive.lewrockwell.com/decoster/decoster21.html http://www.mises.org/daily/607 http://archive.lewrockwell.com/orig/mercer1.html http://archive.lewrockwell.com/dilorenzo/dilorenzo18.html https://mises.org/journals/rae/pdf/rae7_2_2.pdf Bitcoin Address: 1Fd8RuZqJNG4v56rPD1v6rgYptwnHeJRWs Litecoin Address: LL76SbNek3dT8bv2APZNhWgNv3nHEzAgKT Get more from Stefan Molyneux and Freedomain Radio including books, podcasts and other info at: http://www.freedomainradio.com Amazon US Affiliate Link: www.fdrurl.com/AmazonUS Amazon Canada Affiliate Link: www.fdrurl.com/AmazonCanada Amazon UK Affiliate Link: www.fdrurl.com/AmazonUK Stefan Molyneux's Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stefan.molyneux Twitter: https://twitter.com/stefanmolyneux Google+: https://www.google.com/+StefanMolyneux_Freedomain_Radio Linked In: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/stefan-molyneux/5/72a/703 Freedomain Radio Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Official.Freedomain.Radio Twitter: https://twitter.com/freedomainradio Google+: https://www.google.com/+FreedomainradioFDR LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/freedomain-radio Message Board: http://board.freedomainradio.com Meet-Up Groups: http://www.meetup.com/Freedomain-Radio/ Blogspot: http://freedomain.blogspot.com/ iTunes Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/freedomain-radio!-volume-6/id552010683
Views: 594756 Stefan Molyneux
The Secret of the Silver Car by Wyndham Martyn
 
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Before he went to join the Armed Forces in World War I France, Anthony Trent had a successfull secret 'career' as a master criminal in the USA, never caught by the police. The war has just ended - but now Anthony Trent seriously fears exposure. While in the trenches, an explosion buried him alive, along with an English soldier. Thinking they would never get out alive, Anthony revealed his identity to the other soldier - just before they were rescued and separated. After recovering from his injuries, all Anthony can think about is finding the English soldier - to thank him for saving his life, but also to know whether the man will betray his big secret. His search is full of adventures, including espionage, blackmail and love. Chapter 1. The Puzzling Passenger - 00:00 Chapter 2. The Man in the Dark - 19:48 Chapter 3. The Beginning of the Search - 36:49 Chapter 4. A Lady Interrupts - 1:33:56 Chapter 5. The Man who Denied - 1:58:37 Chapter 6. Fresh Fields - 2:30:04 Chapter 7. The Sentence of Banishment - 2:56:54 Chapter 8. Count Michael Temesvar - 3:17:58 Chapter 9. Pauline - 3:37:11 Chapter 10. The Greater Game - 4:19:32 Chapter 11. Anthony Plays His Hand - 4:37:12 Chapter 12. Saint Anthony - 5:18:40 Chapter 13. Down to the Sea - 5:51:26 Chapter 14. The Cabinet Meeting - 6:36:15 Chapter 15. Anthony the Triumphant - 6:52:12 This is preceded by "Anthony Trent, Master Criminal": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCbt81C-Z8o
Views: 2048 Audiobooks Unleashed
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 208331 Shari Wing
Judah P. Benjamin | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Judah P. Benjamin 00:02:30 1 Early and personal life 00:08:18 2 Louisiana lawyer 00:11:33 3 Electoral career 00:11:43 3.1 State politician 00:15:36 3.2 Mexican railroad 00:16:44 3.3 Election to the Senate 00:19:20 3.4 Spokesman for slavery 00:23:20 3.5 Secession crisis 00:27:55 4 Confederate statesman 00:28:04 4.1 Attorney General 00:31:39 4.2 Secretary of War 00:38:58 4.3 Confederate Secretary of State 00:39:26 4.3.1 Basis of Confederate foreign policy 00:41:49 4.3.2 Appointment 00:43:27 4.3.3 Early days (1862–1863) 00:48:14 4.3.4 Increasing desperation (1863–1865) 00:52:52 5 Escape 00:57:41 6 Exile 01:03:22 7 Appraisal 01:09:25 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Judah Philip Benjamin, QC (August 11, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was a lawyer and politician who was a United States Senator from Louisiana, a Cabinet officer of the Confederate States and, after his escape to the United Kingdom at the end of the American Civil War, an English barrister. Benjamin was the first Jew to be elected to the United States Senate who had not renounced that faith, and was the first Jew to hold a Cabinet position in North America. Benjamin was born to Sephardic Jewish parents from London, who had moved to St. Croix in the Danish West Indies when it was occupied by Britain during the Napoleonic Wars. Seeking greater opportunities, his family immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in Charleston, South Carolina. Judah Benjamin attended Yale College but left without graduating. He moved to New Orleans, where he read law and passed the bar. Benjamin rose rapidly both at the bar and in politics. He became a wealthy planter and slaveowner and was elected to and served in both houses of the Louisiana legislature prior to his election by the legislature to the US Senate in 1852. There, he was an eloquent supporter of slavery. After Louisiana seceded in 1861, Benjamin resigned as senator and returned to New Orleans. He soon moved to Richmond after Confederate President Jefferson Davis appointed him as Attorney General. Benjamin had little to do in that position, but Davis was impressed by his competence and appointed him as Secretary of War. Benjamin firmly supported Davis, and the President reciprocated the loyalty by promoting him to Secretary of State in March 1862, while Benjamin was being criticized for the rebel defeat at the Battle of Roanoke Island. As Secretary of State, Benjamin attempted to gain official recognition for the Confederacy by France and the United Kingdom, but his efforts were ultimately unsuccessful. To preserve the Confederacy as military defeats made its situation increasingly desperate, he advocated freeing and arming the slaves late in the war, but his proposals were only partially accepted in the closing month of the war. When Davis fled the Confederate capital of Richmond in early 1865, Benjamin went with him. He left the presidential party and was successful in escaping from the mainland United States, but Davis was captured by Union troops. Benjamin sailed to Great Britain, where he settled and became a barrister, again rising to the top of his profession before retiring in 1883. He died in Paris the following year.
Views: 57 wikipedia tts