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Carotid Artery exam - Jessica Nishikawa
 
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Jessica Nishikawa demonstrates the examination of the carotid arteries. Subscribe at http://www.youtube.com/c/JessicaNishikawa. Follow on Twitter @JessNishi
Views: 87648 Jessica Nishikawa
Carotid and Jugular exam
 
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How to examinate the carotid artery (pulse, etc) and the Jugular veins.
Views: 348609 Jose Pablo
Aortic Stenosis Murmur and Other Signs
 
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Scrubs! This is the first in our Pop Culture Cases series, where we take medical storylines from television and break open the case to get at the smooth, creamy learning inside. Today we’re talking about Mr Burski, JD’s very first patient in the very episode of Scrubs (helpfully entitled My First Day). If you like Scrubs (and most doctors do!), I’m sure you’ll find this episode interesting. Mr Burski is admitted with what we think sounds like abdominal pain. JD notices a systolic murmur, which is most likely due to aortic stenosis. Mr Burski’s case is discussed in more depth in the opening video to the series. Causes of aortic stenosis include… Senile calcification Congenital bicuspid valve Rheumatic fever Signs include a slow rising pulse, a heave if the ventricles are hypertrophied and the classic ejection systolic murmur, heard best in the second intercostal space just right of the sternum. For more on identifying heart murmurs, check out our original video on the topic at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXXiMoEMYmI. In extremis, patients may experience chest pain, dyspnoea or syncopal episodes. Symptoms are usually suggestive of severe underlying disease. Treatments include percutaneous valvuloplasty and an aortic valve replacement. Valve replacements can be tissue (porcine and bovine grafts, or from a cadaver) or mechanical. A mechanical valve necessitates long-term anti-coagulation. Hope you find this video series useful! And let us know what topics you’d like to see us cover next. REFERENCES: 1. Lawrence B (2001). Scrubs – Season 1 Episode 1 “My First Day”. Doozer. Touchstone Television. 2. Longmore M, Wilkinson IB, Davidson EH Foulkes A, Mafi AR (2010). Cardiovascular medicine. In: Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine (Eight Edition). Oxford Press. pp 86 – 153 3. Ballinger A (2012). Cardiovascular disease. In: Essentials of Kumar & Clark's Clinical Medicine (Fifth Edition). Saunders Elsevier. pp 407 – 504 4. Davies JER, Nijjer S (2014). Cardiology. In: Kalra, PA. Essential Revision Notes for MRCP (Fourth Edition). PasTest. pp 1 - 64 MUSIC: Easy Lemon Airport Lounge Spy Glass All courtesy of Kevin Mcleod at Incompetech.com
Views: 31330 HippocraTV
Cardiovascular Examination - OSCE Guide
 
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Help support us by downloading the Geeky Medics app 👾 https://geekymedics.com/geeky-medics-app/ and get early access to our latest content and offline functionality. To see the written guide alongside the video, head over to our website https://geekymedics.com/cardiovascular-examination-2 This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the Cardiovascular Examination OSCE. Check out the Geeky Medics quiz platform, with over 700 free medical MCQs: https://geekyquiz.com Normal heart sounds and aortic regurgitation/stenosis sounds Recorded on a Thinklabs Digital Stethoscope (https://www.thinklabs.com) Join the Geeky Medics community: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Instagram https://instagram.com/geekymedics Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics Always adhere to your medical school/local hospital guidelines when performing examinations or clinical procedures. Do NOT perform any examination or procedure on patients based purely upon the content of these videos. Geeky Medics accepts no liability for loss of any kind incurred as a result of reliance upon the information provided in this video. Some people find this video useful for ASMR purposes. Check out our Geeky Medics merchandise on our store here https://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/geeky-medics-store Subscribe to our newsletter, to be the first to know about our latest content https://geekymedics.com/newsletter/
Views: 602468 Geeky Medics
Cardiovascular Examination - Clinical Examination of the Heart
 
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A successful cardiovascular exam includes visual examination, palpation of the apical impulse, auscultation of Erb's point, auscultation of the carotids, and auscultation over the four different heart valve locations (aortic, pulmonic, tricuspid, and mitral). Additionally, the radial pulse is palpated while auscultating to distinguish whether a murmur is diastolic or systolic. Video Index: 0:13 - Inspection of the thorax 0:29 - Palpation of the apex heart beat 0:59 - Auscultation of the heart 1:16 - Auscultation of the Erb’s point 1:33 - Using Erb’s point to check the heart rate 1:45 - Systolic and diastolic heart sound identification 2:01 - Ascultating individual valves: aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, mitral 2:41 - Ascultation of the carotids 2:54 - Ascultating the pulmonary and aortic valves 3:04 - Ascultation of the mitral valve 3:16 - Mitral valve murmurs Subscribe to AMBOSS YouTube for the latest clinical examination videos, medical student interviews, study tips and tricks, and live webinars! Free 5 Day Trial: https://go.amboss.com/amboss-YT Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amboss_med/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AMBOSS.Med/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ambossmed Blog: https://blog.amboss.com/us #CardiovascularExamination #AuscultationOfTheHeart #USMLE #AMBOSSMed
Bruit (Medical Symptom)
 
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Possible causes of Bruit (Medical Symptom) Bruit is the unusual sound that blood makes when it rushes past an obstruction in an artery when the sound is auscultated with the bell portion of a stethoscope This video contains general medical information. If in doubt, always seek professional medical advice. The medical information is not advice and should not be treated as such. The medical information is provided without any representations or warranties, express or implied. We do not warrant or represent that the medical information on this websiteis true, accurate, complete, current or non-misleading Music: 'Undaunted' Kevin Macleod CC-BY-3.0 Source/Images: "Bruit" CC-BY-2.5 https://www.freebase.com/m/07qwnz
Breath holds with visible neck pulse
 
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Recording of my heart beating while I lay down with the stethoscope placed at apex. I am doing a few breath holds to trigger my heart to react and pump harder (sorry for the loudness of my heart sounds) as you can see the blood dancing in my neck. I hope you enjoy.
Views: 8241 Hachel Hachel
Apical Pulse Assessment Location Nursing | Auscultate and Palpate Apical Pulse
 
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Apical pulse assessment and location demonstration for nurses: Where is the location of the apical pulse? It is found on the left side of the chest in the 5th intercostal space at the midclavicular line. The apical pulse is also the location of PMI (point of maximal impulse) and is at the apex of the heart. As the nurse, you will be assessing the apical pulse during a cardiac assessment and before administering certain types of cardiac medications, such as Digoxin (cardiac glycoside). A normal apical pulse is 60-100 bpm in an adult. Prioring to auscultating the apical pulse, it is important to palpate the apical pulse. The apical pulse may not be palpable in all patients, especially if the patient has a thick chest wall (obesity etc.). Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/apical-pulse-assessment-and-location/ More nursing assessment skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RegisteredNurseRNs Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/registerednursern_com/ Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos All of our videos in a playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAhHxt663pU&list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXMveRcN4df0bad3ugEaQnk Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 135251 RegisteredNurseRN
Inspection and Palpation Heart part 1
 
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Cardiac, Anterior Chest
Views: 91145 nurse5616
Heart Sounds and Heart Murmurs, Animation.
 
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Basic hearts sounds and common heart murmurs. This video and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/cardiology-and-vascular-diseases ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Voice by: Sue Stern. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. When a healthy heart beats, it makes a “lub-dub” sound. The first heart sound “lub”, also known as S1, is caused by the closing of the AV valves after the atria have pumped blood into the ventricles. The second heart sound “dub”, or S2, originates from the closing of the aortic and pulmonary valves, right after the ventricles have ejected the blood. The time interval between S1 and S2 is when the ventricles contract, called SYSTOLE. The interval between S2 and the NEXT S1 is when the ventricles relax and are filled with blood, called DIASTOLE. Diastole is longer than systole, hence the lub-dub, lub-dub, lub-dub… Heart sounds are auscultated at 4 different sites on the chest wall which correspond to the location of blood flow as it passes through the aortic, pulmonic, tricuspid, and mitral valves, respectively. This is how SIMILAR defects associated with DIFFERENT valves are differentiated. Heart murmurs are whooshing sounds produced by turbulent flow of blood. Murmurs are diagnosed based on the TIME they occur in the cardiac cycle, their changes in INTENSITY over time, and the auscultation SITE where they are best heard. Examples of conditions associated with common systolic murmurs include: - MITRAL valve regurgitation, when the mitral valve does NOT CLOSE properly and blood surges back to the left atrium during systole. The murmur starts at S1, when the AV valves close, and maintains the same intensity for the entire duration of systole. This holosystolic murmur is best heard at the mitral region -the apex, with radiation to the left axilla. Because the valve closure in mitral regurgitation is INcomplete, S1 is often quieter. On the other side of the heart, a TRICUSPID valve regurgitation has similar timing and shape, but it is loudest in the tricuspid area and the sound radiates up, along the left sternal border. - AORTIC valve stenosis, when the aortic valve does NOT OPEN properly and blood is forced through a narrow opening. The blood flow starts small, rises to a maximum in mid-systole at the peak of ventricular contraction, then attenuates toward the end of systole. This results in a crescendo-decrescendo, or a diamond-shaped, murmur which starts a short moment after S1. It is often preceded by an ejection click caused by the opening of the STENOTIC valve. Aortic stenosis murmur is loudest in the aortic area and the sound radiates to the carotid arteries in the neck following the direction of blood flow. Again, on the other side of the heart, a PULMONIC stenosis has the same characteristics but is best heard in the pulmonic area and does NOT radiate to the neck. Other conditions that cause audible systolic murmurs include ventricular septal defect and mitral valve prolapse. An example of diastolic murmurs is aortic valve regurgitation. This is when the aortic valve does NOT CLOSE properly, resulting in blood flowing back to the left ventricle during diastole- the filling phase. As the blood flows in the REVERSE direction, the murmur is best heard NOT in the aortic area, but rather along the left sternal border. It peaks at the beginning of diastole when the pressure difference is highest, then rapidly decreases as the equilibrium is reached. Other common diastolic murmurs are associated with pulmonic regurgitation, mitral stenosis and tricuspid stenosis.
Views: 986456 Alila Medical Media
Temporal Artery Examination
 
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Views: 50121 MDforAll
Cardiovascular Examination - OSCE Guide (Old Version)
 
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CHECK OUT THE BRAND NEW VERSION OF OUR CARDIOVASCULAR EXAMINATION VIDEO HERE: https://youtu.be/XU_xeUMJ3Zc To see the written guide alongside the video, head over to our website https://geekymedics.com/cardiovascular-examination-2/ Download the Geeky Medics app here 👾 https://geekymedics.com/geeky-medics-app/ This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the Cardiovascular Examination OSCE. Check out the Geeky Medics quiz platform, with over 700 free medical MCQs: https://geekyquiz.com Join the Geeky Medics community: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Instagram https://instagram.com/geekymedics Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics Always adhere to your medical school/local hospital guidelines when performing examinations or clinical procedures. Do NOT perform any examination or procedure on patients based purely upon the content of these videos. Geeky Medics accepts no liability for loss of any kind incurred as a result of reliance upon the information provided in this video. Some people find this video useful for ASMR purposes. Check out our Geeky Medics merchandise on our store here https://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/geeky-medics-store Subscribe to our newsletter, to be the first to know about our latest content https://geekymedics.com/newsletter/
Views: 834921 Geeky Medics
Dictating a physical exam
 
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General: Patient is a year old male in no acute distress. Normal affect, dress, and hygiene. HEENT: Head is normocephalic and atraumatic. External ears are symmetrical. Pupils are equal round and reactive to light and accommodation, extraocular movements intact. Sclera are anicteric. Conjunctivae are clear. External nares is patent. Mouth has moist mucous membranes and good dentition. No thrush, vesicles, or buccal lesions. No oropharyngeal erythema or exudate. Neck: Neck is supple. Normal ROM. No masses, nodules, tenderness, lymphadenopathy or thyromegaly. Trachea midline. No carotid bruits. No JVD. Cardiovascular: Regular rate and rhythm, with normal S1 and S2. No murmurs, rubs, or gallops. No thrills, no heaves, no displaced point of maximal impulse. Respiratory: Lungs clear to auscultation bilaterally. No wheezes/rales/rhonchi/stridor or crackles. Chest wall expands symmetrically. Good air movement. Normal tactile fremitus, no egophony. Gastrointestinal: Abdomen soft, non-tender, non-distended. Normoactive bowel sounds. No hepatomegaly or splenomegaly. No scars, no masses. No rebound or guarding. Skin: Skin is warm and dry. No rashes, lesions, ulcerations, subcutaneous nodules, bruising or petechiae. Extremities: Pulses intact 2+ bilaterally and symmetric in upper and lower extremities. No pain or edema in lower extremities. Normal capillary refill. No cyanosis, clubbing, nail pitting or stippling. Musculoskeletal: Normal muscle tone and bulk. Normal ROM throughout and 5/5 strength in all extremities. No joint swelling or tenderness. Neurologic: Alert and oriented to person place and time. Cranial nerves 2 through 12 grossly intact. No dysarthria or dysphasia. Normal sensation to light touch and proprioception. Deep tendon reflexes intact 2+ bilaterally. No clonus. Babinskis downgoing bilaterally. Normal finger-to-nose and heel-to-shin tests. Normal gait. Romberg not assessed. Psychological: Alert and oriented to person place and time. Judgment and insight intact. Recent and distant memory intact. No depression, anxiety, or agitation.
Views: 281 Tom Borel
Mastering Cardiovascular Examination By Dr. Maria
 
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General Inspection: Inspect the patient status whether he or she is comfortable at rest or obviously short of breath.[1] Inspect the neck for increased jugular venous pressure (JVP)or abnormal waves.[2] Any abnormal movements such as head bobbing. There are specific signs associated with cardiac illness and abnormality however, during inspection any noticed cutaneous sign should be noted. Inspect the hands for: Temperature - described as warm or cool, clammy or dry Skin turgor for hydration Janeway lesion Osler's node At the nails Splinter hemorrhage and Quincke's pulsation should be looked for as well as any deformity of the nail such as Beau's lines, clubbing or peripheral cyanosis. Inspect the head for: Cheeks for the malar flush of mitral stenosis. The eyes for corneal arcus and surrounding tissue for xanthalasma. Conjuctiva pallor a sign of anemia. The mouth for hygiene. The mucosa for hydration and pallor or central cyanosis. The ear lobes for Frank's sign. Then inspect the precordium for: visible pulsations apex beat masses scars lesions signs of trauma and previous surgery (e.g. median sternotomy) permanent Pace Maker praecordial bulge Palpation[edit] The pulses should be palpated, first the radial pulse commenting on rate and rhythm then the brachial pulse commenting on character and finally the carotid pulse again for character. The pulses may be: Bounding as in large pulse pressure found in aortic regurgitation or CO2 retention. And the rhythm should be assessed as regular, regularly irregular or irregularly irregular. Consistency of the strength to assess for Pulsus alternans. Slow rising as found in aortic stenosis known as parvus et tardus Jerky as found in HOCM Pulses can also be auscultated for features like Traube's pistol shot femoral pulse. Palpation of the precordium[edit] The valve areas are palpated for abnormal pulsations (palpable heart murmurs known as thrills) and precordial movements (known as heaves). Heaves are best felt with the heel of the hand at the sternal border. Palpation of the apex beat[edit] The apex beat is found approximately in the 5th left intercostal space in the mid-clavicular line. It can be impalpable for a variety of reasons including obesity, emphysema, effusion and rarely dextrocardia. The apex beat is assessed for size, amplitude, location, impulse and duration. There are specific terms to describe the sensation such as tapping, heaving and thrusting. Often the apex beat is felt diffusely over a large area, in this case the most inferior and lateral position it can be felt in should be described as well as the location of the largest amplitude. Finally the sacrum and ankles are checked for pitting edema which is caused by right ventricular failure in isolation or as part of congestive cardiac failure. Auscultation[edit] One should comment on S1 and S2 - if the splitting is abnormal or louder than usual. S3 - the emphasis and timing of the syllables in the word Kentucky is similar to the pattern of sounds in a precordial S3. S4 - the emphasis and timing of the syllables in the word Tennessee is similar to the pattern of sounds in a precordial S4. If S4 S1 S2 S3 Also known as a gallop rhythm. diastolic murmurs (e.g. aortic regurgitation, mitral stenosis) systolic murmurs (e.g. aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation) pericardial rub (suggestive of pericarditis) The base of the lungs should be auscultated for signs of pulmonary oedema due to a cardiac cause such as bilateral basal crepitations.
Carotid bruit
 
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visible carotid bruit of my patient having hypothyroid and hypertention for last 30 yr .
Views: 46223 Ayasmit.com
Apex beat (visible Apex beat with palpable thrill.
 
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The apex beat (lat. ictus cordis), also called the apical impulse, is the pulse felt at the point of maximum impulse (PMI), which is the point on the precordium farthest outwards (laterally) and downwards (inferiorly) from the sternum at which the cardiac impulse can be felt. The cardiac impulse is the vibration resulting from the heart rotating, moving forward and striking against the chest wall during systole. The PMI is not the apex of the heart but is on the precordium not far from it. The normal apex beat can be palpated in the precordium left 5th intercostal space, half inch medial to the left midclavicular line. In children the apex beat occurs in the fourth rib interspace medial to the nipple. The apex beat may also be found at abnormal locations; in many cases of dextrocardia, the apex beat may be felt on the right side. The character of the apex beat may provide vital diagnostic clues: A forceful impulse indicates volume overload in the heart (as might occur in aortic regurgitation) An uncoordinated (dyskinetic) apex beat involving a larger area than normal indicates ventricular dysfunction; such as an aneurysm following myocardial infarction A pulse deficit between the PMI and periphery may occur in some arrhythmias, such as premature ventricular contraction or atrial fibrillation.
Views: 2762 shivam singh
Carotid Artery Pulsing
 
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This is a short video of my husband while he was sleeping and the veins pulsing in his neck.
Views: 1799 BrattneyRose
Complete Heart Sounds In 7 minutes - with Heart Sounds Audio
 
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If you are stuck with heart sounds, this video will help you organize & revise heart sounds alongwith audio of the heart sounds. All you need to remember for exams are summarized here. Heart sounds can be categorized into Normal, Extra, Additional sounds & Murmurs for the sake of simplicity. 1. Normal Heart Sounds - S1, S2 2. Extra Heart Sounds - S3, S4 3. Additional Heart Sounds - Clicks (i.e., Ejection systolic clicks, Other Systolic Clicks) & Snap (Opening Snap) 4. Murmurs - Systolic, Diastolic & Continuous Murmurs Pericarditis, Tumor plop, Pericardial knock, Prosthetic valve sounds are some other cardiac sounds which are not included here & shall be discussed in future videos. Please Visit & Subscribe Our Channel for Latest Videos: https://www.youtube.com/lastsecondmedicine Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lastsecondmedicine Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Last_Second_Med Please Leave you valued suggestion in Comments.
Views: 493669 Last Second Medicine
How to palpate femoral pulse
 
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The femoral artery (Latin: arteria femoralis) is a large artery in the thigh and the main arterial supply to the lower limb. It enters the thigh from behind the inguinal ligament as the common femoral artery, a continuation of the external iliac artery. Here, it lies midway between the anterior superior iliac spine and the symphysis pubis. The common femoral artery gives off the profunda femoris artery and becomes the superficial femoral artery to descend along the anteromedial part of the thigh in the femoral triangle. It enters and passes through the adductor (subsartorial) canal, and becomes the popliteal artery as it passes through an opening in adductor magnus near the junction of the middle and distal thirds of the thigh. The Femoral Region: As with examination of any other area of the body, exposure is key. Socks, stockings, pants and skirts should all be removed. 1.Begin by simply looking at the area in question, which is on either side of the crease separating the leg from the groin region. Make note of any discrete swellings, which might represent adenopathy or a femoral hernia. 2.Palpate the area, feeling carefully for the femoral pulses as well as for inguinal/femoral adenopathy (nodes which surround the femoral artery and vein.... up to one cm in size are considered non-pathologic). If you feel any lymph nodes, note if they are firm or soft, fixed in position or freely mobile (fixed, firm nodes are more worrisome for pathologic states). Pls Subscriptions and Share : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFFnAEmlw80lqFPtJ4-DRPg [email protected] https://twitter.com/BariSadik https://www.facebook.com/sadikatulbari.sadik https://www.facebook.com/mats.dmf?ref=hl
Views: 159675 Sadikatul Bari Sadik
MRCP PACES Videos- Station 3 - CVS Examination summary
 
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I find Cardiovascular system examination the most easy, objective and systematic of all system examinations. The only thing which make students fear this examination is they are unsure whether they will be able to pick up findings with stethoscope or not. But in my opinion, you can get to the diagnosis even before you put your stethoscope on patients chest, only if you perform the general physical examination (GPE) related to CVS in a methodical way. Cardiovascular system examination can either be started from periphery proceeding to precordium or from precordium to periphery. Ideally it should be started from periphery with general physical examination related to CVS. Because you can get important clues by examining pulse and measuring BP like collapsing pulse, wide pulse pressure, visible pulsatile carotids can provide you clue about presence of Aortic regurgitation. Similarly nail signs like clubbing, splinter hemorrhages can suggest infective endocarditis. So start from Hands and arms and Look for clubbing, peripheral cyanosis, xanthomata or peripheral signs of endocarditis. Determine pulse rate, rhythm and character. Check collapsing pulse here. Ask for the blood pressure. Look at the face for central cyanosis, pallor, a malar flush, corneal arcus or xanthelasmata. Determine the height of the jugular venous pulse and any abnormal waveform. Do not fear about JVP waveforms if you have correctly determined if it is raised or not and correlated with other findings you pick, even that will suffice. Now proceed toward Precordium. In most cases, by now from peripheral clues you shall be able to anticipate what are expected findings here and if that is the case, this part is easy now. Here Inspection, Palpation and Auscultation. Do not waste time in percussion. Practically nobody do it even if it is mentioned in clinical methods books. INSPECTION: Inspect for any scar, pigmentation, pulsatile precordium, visibly displaced apex beat. Midline scar can give you clue about 2 things: 1. ByPass graft surgery: so do look for scar of graft site on shins 2. Valve replacement surgery PALPATION: Determine the position of the apex and any abnormalities in apex beat character. Feel for a right ventricular heave. Feel for thrills. Ask yourself if pulse character, blood pressure and apex position predict any valve abnormality. AUSCULTATION: Listen for S1 and S2; note any abnormal intensity of S1 and any abnormal splitting of S2. Listen for any S3 or S4. Listen for added sounds like clicks, metallic valve's sounds. Listen for murmurs. Consider the character, location, radiation, intensity and timing of murmurs (but give greatest attention to character). Remember to listen in the left lateral position and with the patient sitting forward. DO NOT FORGET to palpate carotid pulse when auscultate Precordium to time heart sounds and murmurs with pulse. FINALLY: Then ask about pain in abdomen and palpate abdomen to check hepatomegaly, check pedal oedema, scar mark of bypass graft on shin (in case you noticed median scar on chest). Get patient to sitting position and check sacral oedema and listen to lung bases to rule out any element of cardiac decompensation i.e., pulmonary oedema. conclude your examination by telling examiner that you would like to check BP if not measured and looking at temperature charts of the patient.
Views: 8696 Last Second Medicine
Systolic murmurs, diastolic murmurs, and extra heart sounds - Part 1 | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Joshua Cohen. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-cardiovascular-diseases/rn-heart-valve-diseases/v/systolic-murmurs-diastolic-murmurs-and-extra-heart-sounds-part-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-cardiovascular-diseases/rn-heart-valve-diseases/v/how-to-identify-murmurs?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2424841 khanacademymedicine
Inspection_chest wall
 
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Visible pulsations(~ probably)_anterior chest wall in patient of ascites with dilated veins on abdominal wall and everted umbilicus⚕
Views: 192 Hara Prathap
Examination of a Thyroid Lump
 
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This video is on clinical examination technique of a thyroid lump for medical undergraduates. Presented by the Audio Visual Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Demonstrated by Dr. D. J. Anthony MBBS, MS, FRCS, Senior Lecturer, University of Colombo. Script & Direction - Dr. Pramitha Tilakaratne MBBS (Col), Dr. Kasun Ratnayake MBBS (Col) Narration - Dr. Kasun Ratnayake MBBS (Col) Camera & Editing - Chandrakumara Perera
Views: 212742 Kasun Ratnayake
Hướng dẫn khám bệnh: Hệ tim mạch
 
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Guide to physical Examination: The Cardiovascular System ''Kiểm tra Thể chất không chỉ là một phương tiện thu thập dữ liệu và tạo ra các giả thuyết cho quan hệ nhân quả và Kiểm tra. Nó rất quan trọng đối với sự hình thành cầu nối người bệnh và bác sĩ lâm sàng, sự khởi đầu của một quan hệ đối tác trị liệu và quá trình hồi phục của bệnh nhân.'' Integrated examination sequence for the cardiovascular system: • Position the patient: supine and reclined at 45 degrees, with the head resting on a pillow. • Examine the general appearance: • Is the patient breathless, cyanosed, sweating or distressed? • Note body habitus (overweight or cachectic), Marfanoid features and the presence of radial or saphenous vein harvest scars. • Check the hands, pulse and blood pressure, face and neck: • Hands: colour and temperature, tobacco staining, clubbing, splinter haemorrhages, Janeway lesions or Osler’s nodes, tendon xanthomata. • Pulse: rate, rhythm, character and synchronicity of radial pulse, collapsing pulse, volume and character of brachial or carotid pulse. • Blood pressure: systolic and diastolic pressure at the brachial artery. • Face: central cyanosis, xanthelasmata, corneal arcus, petechiae. • Neck: timing, waveform and abnormalities of the jugular venous pressure, carotid bruits. • Examine the precordium: • Inspection: look for midline sternotomy or left submammary scars, pacemaker site, visible pulsation. • Palpation: define the character and position of the apex beat, parasternal heave, thrills. • Auscultation: listen over the apex, lower left sternal border, upper right and left sternal borders, over the carotid arteries and left axilla. Listen with the patient on their left side and leaning forward during expiration. – Heart sounds: identify first and second heart sounds (S1 and S2), and any extra heart sounds (S3 or S4). – Additional sounds: clicks and snaps. – Murmurs in systole and/or diastole (timing, duration, character, pitch, intensity, location and radiation). – Pericardial rub. • Other: • Listen for fine end-inspiratory crackles or pleural effusion at the lung bases. • Examine the abdomen for hepatomegaly or pulsatile liver. • Check for ankle and sacral oedema. Peripheral arterial and venous system • Inspection of the lower limbs: • Check temperature and colour, capillary refill time, skin discoloration, ulceration, varicosities, scars. • Palpation: • Examine the abdomen for expansile aortic aneurysm. • Identify the femoral, popliteal, posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis pulses. • Identify pitting oedema. • Perform Buerger’s test. • Auscultation: • Listen for bruits over the abdomen and over the femoral arteries _____________ With Formula: Raising Awareness. Saving Lives🥰 Pleased to be a channel in the field of Medicine, thereby, with the desire to share and support people and all subjects about Medical knowledge to improve health care skills for people. Especially, the channel specializes in pediatric echocardiography imaging starting from fetus to adulthood with heart diseases and more than. Copyright of Vietnamese images in the video belongs to Knowledge Of Med. If there are any issues with the videos please contact me at the following address: [email protected] __ To support, please subsciribe and share with friends. Thanks very much! Best regards./.
Views: 180 Knowledge Of Med
The Ashes -A Jemi Story- Episode 5
 
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=== “HEY! GET DOWN FROM THERE!” Joe heard someone yell, but he wasn’t going to look down to see who it was. He climbed up the ladder until he made it right to the top, terrified of falling but that fear was nothing in comparison to how he felt about watching helplessly as Demi potentially died. “Demi?!” He called as he got closer, the ladder itself moving closer to the house. It still wasn’t touching the building, but he was close enough to reach in front of him to get inside. The smoke was burning hot as it poured out of the window, the furious roaring of the fire but he could see something just below the window. “Demi!” He called again, coughing because of the smoke. He heard yelling and screaming as he let go of the ladder, reaching for the windowsill and he climbed inside her bedroom. He could barely see in front of him, the flames licking the bottom of her bedroom door and patches of the roof had caved in, leaving a huge hole in the middle of the room- her bed had dropped down to the floor below. Joe could barely breathe because of the smoke, but he pulled Demi up, her body lifeless in his arms but he still threw her over his shoulder, suddenly grateful for all the times he’d gone to the gym despite not having the willpower to want to go. He held onto her with one arm, making sure she didn’t slip as he climbed back out of the window, coughing- the smoke was draining him of all energy, but he was fighting back against it the best he could. He had to get out with her, he couldn’t let her family or friends lose her- she was too young to lose her life. “I’ve got you, Demi… I-I’ve got you.” He choked out, gripping onto the ladder with one hand and he could hear commotion below him as he got closer to the ground. He froze on the ladder as the roof finally all collapsed, making the top floor collapse under the weight. The fire roared on. Joe had gotten to Demi just in time to save her life. “Keep coming down!” He heard someone yell from below him and he shakily did as he was told, feeling hands on him as he got to the bottom and he saw it was paramedics, two of them helping him to lie her on the waiting gurney. Tears streamed down his face at the sight of her. The side of her neck was burned, so was her shoulder and the top part of her arm, her hands burned but not as badly as her neck and shoulder, the burn on her shoulder seeming to go behind her and onto her back too. “There’s no output, start CPR.” One of the paramedics ordered his colleagues and Joe’s eyes widened when he realized what that meant- Demi wasn’t breathing. “NO! No, she can’t die! She can’t fucking die!” Joe exclaimed, fighting back against the two paramedics who held onto him. “Sir, you need to be checked over! You have burns!” One of the paramedics holding onto him tried to make him listen, but he was too hysterical, too focused on Demi to even realize that his arms were burned and his hands were cut up from the glass in the window. Demi’s hands were bleeding too, tiny shards of glass visible in her palms. “Nothing.” One of Demi’s paramedics confirmed after checking for a pulse during a break in her CPR. Joe was shaking, hysterical. He’d only seen her that morning, they’d teased each other like normal- he didn’t want that to be the last time he ever talked to her. He sobbed as he saw them place pads on Demi’s chest, knowing from medical shows what that meant- her shirt was mostly burned off, so they didn’t even have to cut it from her body, it fell apart like ash in their hands when they moved it out of the way. “Charging.” A paramedic warned and Joe let out a sob as Demi’s body jerked upwards as the shock went through her body, the team starting to check her over again for any signs of life, his tears impossibly more hysterical as they shook their heads. “Come on, Demi… come on!” Joe begged through gritted teeth, coughing and feeling the throbbing pain from his burns and the cuts on his hands, but he couldn’t leave Demi. If she were to die, he didn’t want her to be alone with people she didn’t know. The two of them barely knew each other, but he was better than a stranger. “Charging.” The same paramedic announced again, Joe wincing as Demi’s body jerked upwards again, harder this time due to the increase in the electrical charge. Joe watched desperately as Demi was examined again, but he screamed in relief, sinking to the ground when he saw it for himself. Demi’s chest was rising and falling- she was alive. === I’ll post tomorrow if I get AT LEAST six comments! Again, I’m very sorry if episodes today aren’t great. Losing my cat has taken a huge toll on me and it’s one of the hardest things I’ve gone through. I am trying.
Views: 153 LovaticUnbroken8
Abdominojugular reflux
 
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Views: 21870 Timothy Cheng
Arterial Doppler Examination
 
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This video shows how to interpret vascular arterial doppler signal wave-forms in a simple and informative fashion. This is educational especially in teaching how to better utilise a simple hand-held Doppler. It is produced by Huntleigh Diagnostics with whom I have no collaboration.
Views: 192079 Sulaiman Shoab
Heart and Neck Vessels Assessment - Adult Health Assessment
 
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Heart and Neck Vessels: - Gently palpate each carotid artery, one at a time. Normal strength is 2+ or moderate. - Auscultate the carotid artery to determine if a bruit (blowing, swishing sound indicating blood flow turbulence) is present. Use the bell of your stethoscope and ask patient to breath, exhale, and hold it briefly. - To observe the external jugular venous pulse, position patient supine, remove their pillow, turn patient's head slightly away from you, and direct a strong light towards neck. - To observe the internal jugular venous pulse, look in the area of the suprasternal notch.
Views: 28238 MDC. RNs2B
Parasternal heave
 
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A parasternal heave is a precordial impulse that may be felt in patients with cardiac or respiratory disease. Precordial impulses are visible or palpable pulsations of the chest wall, which originate from the heart or the great vessels. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 54046 Audiopedia
HEART AND NECK VESSELS
 
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Views: 552 KRZ0501
Takayasu arteritis | Circulatory System and Disease | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Takayasu arteritis (also known as the pulseless disease) is a type of vasculitis that affects large arteries and leads to significant narrowing of the vasculature. Patients with takayasu arteritis can have symptoms like weak or absent pulses in extremities, widely varying blood pressures, and dizziness. Learn how health care professionals diagnosis takayasu arteritis by examining blood work (such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, granulomas), and taking samples (biopsies) of vascular tissue,. Created by Ian Mannarino. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-cardiovascular-diseases/rn-vasculitis/v/polyarteritis-nodosa?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-cardiovascular-diseases/rn-vasculitis/v/temporal-arteritis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 55988 khanacademymedicine
Heaving apex beat in dilated cardiomyopathy
 
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It's classical heaving apex beat where the impulse is displaced laterally n downwards. The palpating finger is lifted up by the impulse. The impulse is of more than 2/3 of systole. It's confined to only one intercostal space. It's diameter less than 2.5cm or equal to it. It's seen in the conditions of pressure overload of the left ventricle such as aortic stenosis,coarctation of aorta, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hypertensive heart disease
AUSCULTATION IN RENAL ARTERIES
 
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IDENTIFY AUSCULTATION IN RENAL ARTERIES. ACCURATE PLACE!
Views: 50651 Vitebsk Medical
Heart Murmurs: Normal heart Sounds
 
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Do you have trouble telling the difference between normal and abnormal heart sounds? Watch our discussion regarding how to listen for and identify normal heart sounds. Remember it is learning made simple. Website: http://www.imedicalschool.org Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/iMedSchool Follow us on Facebook: https://goo.gl/75BdoZ iMedicalSchool is a channel dedicated to helping you understand complex medical topics in a simple manner. We are dedicated to making sure that you understand every topic presented. We are happy to answer questions and take suggestions. No matter if you are in medical school, nursing school or physician assistant school we are here to help you.
Views: 186413 iMedicalSchool
JVD and PMI check
 
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Views: 2271 Jen C. Wesolowski
Carotid bruit: high grade stenosis
 
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Left internal carotid artery high grade stenosis (max velocity measured: 520cm/sec) in a 72 years old diabetic male with left neck bruit .Dr. Giuseppe Alletto , asp 6 palermo. Assistant: nurse Giuseppe Termini.
Views: 92321 giuseppealletto
Renal artery bruit
 
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Renal artery bruit. For educational purposes.
Views: 225460 logidragon
Epigastric pulsations and Apex Beat
 
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Middle aged man, operated case of Rheumatic Heart Disease, having Mitral stenosis. Tapping Apex, palpable second heat sound (diastolic shock) and diastolic murmur were present. In the video: 1) Epigastric pulsations 2) Apex beat
Views: 5777 Parth Gada